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jerryking : waterfronts   40

For some in Brazil, commemorating slavery is vital - Giving up the ghosts
Print edition | Books and arts
May 23rd 2019| RIO DE JANEIRO
Brazil commemoration life-changing myths Senegal slavery waterfronts
May 23rd 2019| RIO DE JANEIRO
Africa  Afro-Brazilians  ancestry  Brazil  commemoration  life-changing  myths  Rio_de_Janeiro  Senegal  slavery  waterfronts 
october 2019 by jerryking
Port Lands: $1.2b of Trilateral Funding Unlocks Revitalization | Urban Toronto
June 28, 2017 3:50 pm | by Stefan Novakovic.

Three levels of government are committing $1.185 billion of new funding to remake what Waterfront Toronto describes as "one of North America's largest underused urban areas." The investment will fund the much-needed Port Lands Flood Protection Project (PLFPP), unlocking the ambitious reinvention of the 365 hectare (880 acre) Port Lands.

While the mostly vacant and partly de-industrialized Port Lands have long been fodder for blue-sky thinking—once touted as the site of a potential Olympic bid, and more recently Expo 2025—some 290 hectares (715 acres) of the area are currently at risk of flooding. Any visions of the future are contingent on the funding that was finally secured today. Joined by Mayor John Tory and Premier Kathleen Wynne, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau lead the way in announcing a Federal contribution of up to $384 million......Two new naturalized outlets for the Don River will be created, with the waterway—surrounded by the river beds' flood-protecting greenery—carving out the new Villiers Island, which is envisioned as a dense urban entry point to the Port Lands.

Alongside the naturalized river beds, 13 acres of wetlands will be introduced throughout the Port Lands, creating a resilient and sustainable urban environment. In total, 29 hectares of naturalized greens are are planned—including coastal wetlands—as well as 16 acres of parkland, and 14 acres of in-water aquatic habitat. The new waterways will also add 1,000 metres of naturalized river.
Waterfront_Toronto  revitalization  waterfronts  John_Tory  Justin_Trudeau  Kathleen_Wynne  Toronto  floods  Don_River  Port_Lands  wetlands  flood_protection  property_development 
june 2017 by jerryking
Toronto announces plans for new downtown park above active railway - The Globe and Mail
MAHNOOR YAWAR
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Aug. 03, 2016

Toronto plans to build a large-scale downtown park above the railway corridor between Bathurst Street and the Rogers Centre. The Rail Deck Park, spanning 21 acres (8.5 hectares), would harness the open space above the active railway in a bid to connect downtown with the waterfront and counter high-rise development in the densely populated area. ...The proposed park will be modelled after the likes of Chicago’s Millennium Park or the under-construction Hudson Yards in Manhattan, both of which “decked” over active rail corridors.
Toronto  parks  CN  waterfronts  intensification  Rail_Deck_Park  South_Core  railways  urban_intensification  urban_planning 
august 2016 by jerryking
The Scarborough Bluffs are rarely seen — but there’s a plan to change that - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May 13, 2016

[ M. Jane Fairburn in her 2013 book Along the Shore, a history of Toronto's waterfront]

Conservation officials hope to change all that, making the Bluffs safer and easier to visit. They want to shore up dangerous bits, put in more trails and create habitat for wild animals and fish. A study is already under way, with a first set of options to be presented to the public next month.

It is an exciting project, a once-in-a-century chance to open up the whole of the Scarborough shore to a broader public. It is also a delicate one. Officials face the challenge of giving safe access to the Bluffs without destroying the wild quality that lend them their magic. Some people want them left alone altogether. Others want to see a continuous shoreline trail as you might have in an urban waterfront.
Toronto  Marcus_Gee  Scarborough  history  parks  waterfronts  landmarks  landscapes  ravines  conservation  habitats  wilderness  books  TRCA 
may 2016 by jerryking
Hidden landmarks: Why Toronto is at the forefront of the landscape architecture movement - The Globe and Mail
May. 01 2015 | The Globe and Mail | ALEX BOZIKOVIC.

The history of Toronto's University Avenue: The landscape designer André Parmentier planted the avenue in 1829; it was reshaped in the 1920s in the Beaux-Arts style; and in the 1960s, the current landscape was designed by the British-born architect Howard Dunington-Grubb to cap the newly built subway. It includes perennials, statues and vent stacks.

What is clear to Mr. Birnbaum – a century and a half of design ideas – is invisible to most of us, part of the scenery. That is the plight of landscape architecture, and this is what Mr. Birnbaum’s group is hoping to change: to make familiar the idea of a “cultural landscape” as something to be seen, valued and protected by the general public. As he puts it, “We’re making visible the often-invisible hand of the landscape architect.”

What exactly is a “cultural landscape”? It can be a street or a waterfront, designed or inherited. But most often it means a designed outdoor space, the work of landscape architects who deal with urban and ecological lenses, as well as vegetation and the formal design of plazas, streets and other outdoor spaces...Waterfront Toronto: In remaking 800 hectares of the industrial waterfront, that agency has brought together some of the best landscape architects in the world to remake the topography and to set a high standard for the urban fabric it is building....Parks matter! Parks generate real-estate value and, more importantly, a sense of place. As Mr. Birnbaum points out, the waterfront parks “were built first, communicating what the quality of life will be along the waterfront. We think it sets an enviable standard, and that’s why we will be bringing people from all over the globe to see the landscapes and to discuss these issues.”
Toronto  landmarks  landscapes  architecture  design  parks  waterfronts  Waterfront_Toronto  history  public_spaces  quality_of_life 
may 2015 by jerryking
Waterfront Toronto’s ‘innovation centre’ plans unveiled - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH CHURCH - CITY HALL BUREAU CHIEF
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 06 2015,
Toronto  waterfronts  innovation  real_estate  Waterfront_Toronto 
february 2015 by jerryking
Sun Life moving away from Bay Street, leading a shift from Toronto's financial district - The Globe and Mail
TARA PERKINS AND JACQUELINE NELSON
The Globe and Mail (includes correction)
Published Tuesday, Feb. 25 2014
Bay_Street  waterfronts  Toronto  densification  South_Core 
july 2014 by jerryking
The giants of Bay Street may be going south - The Globe and Mail
TARA PERKINS AND OLIVER MOORE
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Apr. 26 2014,
Toronto  Bay_Street  densification  waterfronts  South_Core 
april 2014 by jerryking
How Steeltown transformed into a booming agrifood hub - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 02 2013 | The Globe and Mail| by BARRIE McKENNA.

“Agriculture is the new steel for Hamilton,” said Ian Hamilton, vice-president of the Hamilton Port Authority and head of real estate development. “Five years ago, the market for steel collapsed. And that’s when it hit home that we had to diversify.”

Since then, the port has attracted $200-million in new investment, including $40-million in various agriculture-related projects, such as new and expanded storage and handling for grains and fertilizer. In 2007, Bunge Ltd. expanded its canola processing plant and Biox Corp. opened a 67-million-litre biodiesel plant at the port....The port has ambitious plans to boost tonnage capacity by expanding rail links that would double the length of trains that can access the harbour, to 100 cars from 50. Efforts are also under way to attract new value-added manufacturers, such as margarine makers, distilleries and breweries plus a flour mill to help feed a nearby Maple Leaf Foods mega-bakery, opened in 2011.
Hamilton  agriculture  Barrie_McKenna  grains  pulses  hubs  exporting  Bunge  agribusiness  waterfronts 
october 2013 by jerryking
No cottage? No problem: what to do in Toronto on the May holiday weekend - The Globe and Mail
May. 21, 2011 | Globe & Mail | IAN MERRINGER.
* The Martin Goodman Trail.
* Run up and down the Casa Loma steps, great workout, better view.
* Ravines. No shortage of them.
* Scarborough Bluffs.
* The Don Valley. Again, might want a snack and water.
* Wander around "Chinatown" (Spadina).
* Kensington Market.
* Harbourfront.
travel  things_to_do  ravines  parks  Toronto  Kensington_Market  Chinatown  Harbourfront  Don_River  Scarborough  waterfronts 
may 2011 by jerryking
Tories pledge to create national park in Rouge Valley
Apr. 08, 2011 | Globe and Mail | TAMARA BALUJA. The
Conservatives have pledged to create a national park right in the
backyard of the country’s largest metropolis. The promise unveiled on
Friday in the party’s election platform would protect the Rouge Valley,
11,500 acres of Canada’s unique Carolinian forestland teeming with
vulnerable wildlife on the eastern edge of Toronto....A relatively
unknown park, the Rouge does not command the same popularity as the
Toronto Islands or High Park. But Scarborough councillor Glenn De
Baeremaeker called Rouge Valley a “hidden treasure” famous for bald
eagles, bluebirds, salamander, river otters and even an occasional black
bear...Stretching from Lake Ontario to the Oak Ridges Moraine and
Pickering, the area is currently overseen by several municipalities,
including Markham, Toronto, Whitchurch-Stouffville and Richmond Hill.
That creates some logistical difficulties.
Conservative_Party  elections  forestry  hidden  Lake_Ontario  parks  ravines  Rouge_Park  Scarborough  Southern_Ontario  Toronto  waterfronts  wildlife 
april 2011 by jerryking

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