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jerryking : weaknesses   28

Canadian diplomats warn Trudeau government about perils of deepening ties to Beijing
February 26, 2020 | The Globe and Mail | STEVEN CHASE.

Department of Global Affairs officials have warned the Trudeau government about the perils of deepening ties with China, saying the authoritarian state represents a “strategic challenge” to Canadian values and interests......Canada has for a long time seen China as primarily an economic opportunity, it must now consider the risks of deepening ties and take into account Beijing's long-term strategic challenge to Canada's interests and values......The document was provided to the House of Commons committee on Canada-China relations studying the deep chill in relations following Canada’s December, 2018, arrest of a Chinese executive on a U.S. extradition request. Beijing retaliated by slashing agricultural imports from Canada and practiced what critics call “hostage diplomacy” by locking up two Canadians.
“The crisis has demonstrated Beijing’s readiness and ability to use aggressive political and economic measures to punish Canada … and to propagate norms of international relations inimical to Canadian interest.......China purchases 4 % of Canada’s exports, making it the third-largest trading partner after the U.S. and the E.U. ......As the recent dispute with China has shown – where the Chinese temporarily blocked pork and beef from Canada and dramatically cut purchases of Canadian canola seed – Canadian producers who depend on this market are “vulnerable to sudden and arbitrary trade disruptions,”China is increasingly trying to rewrite the rules in world affairs.....China is a “strategic challenge”/run counter to Canadian values and interest.......China promotes perspectives on governance, economic security and human rights that diverge in fundamental ways from Canada’s........The memo cites China’s Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank as an example of how Beijing promotes its influence abroad. The Trudeau government signed up Canada to join the bank and pledged to purchase a stake worth $256-million. Through the bank and Beijing’s “Belt and Road Initiative” foreign investment campaign, China seeks to “leverage economic prowess to gain regional influence and export its model of [authoritarian] governance around the world,”.......The Chinese government attempts to promote its ideology by inserting CCP language into multilateral documents, challenging universal rights .........Global Affairs also said China’s tough posture in dealing with other countries may be a cover for domestic weaknesses. “There is the image of a global juggernaut but also evidence that Beijing’ assertiveness abroad seeks to compensate for fragility at home,” the memo said. China’s population is aging, the country “lacks a functional social safety net,” and its future development will be constrained by “acute levels of environmental degradation, pollution, corruption, consumer debt and other financial risk,” .........the briefing document warned that China’s bullying of self-ruled Taiwan....could pose one of the biggest challenges to the international order.
“The range of leverage and intimidation towards Taiwan …is even more intense and is likely to test the limits of the current rules-based system.”
AIIB  authoritarianism  briefing  bullying  Canada  Canada-China_relations  China  China_rising  Chinese_Communist_Party  diplomacy  economic_warfare  environmental_degradation  exports  foreign_policy  Global_Affairs_Canada  hostage_diplomacy  hostages  House_of_Commons   Huawei  human_rights  influence_campaigns  international_system  Justin_Trudeau  memoranda  Meng_Wanzhou  national_interests  new_normal  One_Belt_One_Road  PMO  reprisals  rules-based  strategic_thinking  Taiwan  threats  values  weaknesses 
2 hours ago by jerryking
Thinking in Levels (How to Dig Deeper And Think Better)
Apr 21, 2018 | Medium | by Thomas Oppong.

Einstein once said, “You can’t solve a problem from the level of thinking that created the problem in the first place“.
*
[JCK: what follows is an example of thinking in layers] The process of thinking involves several levels, but only a few people think beyond the first level.....Thinking in levels can expose flaws in your decision making process, helping you to make choices with little or no blindspots....Robert Sternberg, a professor of psychology and education at Yale University, says that successful people use three kinds of intelligence: analytical, creative, and practical. A successful person, according to Sternberg, uses all three.......Instead of thinking on the fly, you use mental models to analyse every situation before making a choice.

The 3 thinking levels:
** Level 1
Level one thinkers observe, but rarely interpret or analyse what they see.
They take information on the face value. ..First-level thinking is simplistic and superficial, and just about everyone can do it (a bad sign for anything involving an attempt at superiority). All the first-level thinker needs is an opinion about the future, as in “The outlook for the company is favorable, meaning the stock will go up.” ...Most people get stuck at level 1. They take in facts, statistics and information, but never question the reasoning behind them or make the effort analyse what they have seen, read or been taught. They obsessively seek out truth that confirms their worldviews and cling to it with little room for metacognition (thinking about their thinking)..

** Level 2
At this level, you allow yourself to interpret, make connections and meanings. Second-level thinking is deep, complex and convoluted....At the second level, decision makers begin to interpret and analyze the pieces they have observed and put them together to form meaning.
This is the level at which we begin to look for alignments, contrast, repetition or improvements....Level two thinkers synthesis better — build up or connect separate pieces of information to form a larger, more coherent pattern. They are better at reorganizing or rearranging ideas to produce a more comprehensive understanding of the “big picture”.

** Level 3
This is the alpha stage of thinking.
Level 3 thinkers have the capacity to transfer knowledge, i.e., to apply a concept learned in one context to different contexts than the one in which the concept was originally learned.....Level 3 thinkers can view an issue or idea from a variety of viewpoints, standpoints, or positions to gain a more comprehensive and holistic understanding. They generate imaginative ideas, unique perspectives, innovative strategies, or novel (alternative) approaches to traditional practices.
Albert_Einstein  blindspots  books  business_acumen  connecting_the_dots  critical_thinking  decision_making  interpretation  metacognition  questions  thinking  thinking_deliberatively  weaknesses 
19 days ago by jerryking
Globe editorial: China wants Canada to shut up. That’s exactly why we shouldn’t
December 2, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | EDITORIAL.

That’s why “guts” isn’t the answer. Canada needs to be smart, and exploit Beijing’s weaknesses.

The biggest one is the Chinese economy. Mr. Xi’s Orwellian surveillance state needs steady economic growth to keep Chinese citizens passive. Mr. Trump’s trade war has slowed China’s growth and made the Communist Party a bit more vulnerable than it would like.

You could see that in the threat made by China’s ambassador to Canada after the U.S. legislation standing up for Hong Kong was passed. “If anything happens like this, we will certainly have very bad damage in our bilateral relationship,” he said of a possible similar action by Ottawa.

The last thing China wants is a co-ordinated, global effort calling out its abuses. Which means there ought to be just such an effort. Instead of letting Beijing isolate it, Ottawa should explore strategic alliances that would prevent that from happening.

Which leads to China’s other weakness: Its actions in Hong Kong are a violation of the treaty it signed when it took over the territory from the British in 1997.

Beijing agreed to a “gradual and orderly” evolution to universal suffrage in Hong Kong. Instead, under Mr. Xi, it has moved in the opposite direction.

If democratic countries stood up as one and demanded that it live up to its commitments, it would be difficult for China to carry out retaliation.

Instead, too many countries like Canada are leaving it to brave Hong Kongers to battle alone for something the entire world has a stake in. We can do better.
alliances  asymmetrical  bullying  Canada  Canada-China_relations  China  China_rising  editorials  Hong_Kong  Huawei  hostages  Meng_Wanzhou  new_normal  reprisals  strategic_alliances  surveillance_state  weaknesses  Xi_Jinping 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
How to Spot and Overcome Your Hidden Weaknesses - The New York Times
By Tim Herrera
April 23, 2018

So what can we do to stop embarrassing ourselves with, say, our awful French if we don’t know how awful it is? Research suggests two routes to enlightenment.

First, ask for feedback. It’s not easy, and it can sometimes be tough to hear, but outside input is crucial to shining a light on your blind spots. Here are some tips for getting and giving better feedback.

Second, keep learning. The more knowledgeable you are about something, the more you’re able to identify the gaps in your own understanding of it.
weaknesses  self-awareness  feedback  continuous_learning  hidden 
may 2018 by jerryking
The Limits of Amazon
Jan. 1, 2018 | WSJ | By Christopher Mims.

Amazon’s core mission as a data-driven instant-gratification company. Its fanaticism for customer experience is enabled by every technology the company can get its hands on, from data centers to drones. Imagine the data-collecting power of Facebook wedded to the supply-chain empire of Wal-Mart—that’s Amazon.

There is one major problem with the idea that Amazon-will-eat-the-entire-universe, however. Amazon is good at identifying commodity products and making those as cheap and available as possible. “Your margin is my opportunity” is one of Chief Executive Jeff Bezos’s best-known bon mots. But this system isn’t very compatible with big-ticket, higher-margin items.....

How Amazon Does It
Amazon now increasingly makes its money by extracting a percentage from the sales of other sellers on its site. It has become a platform company like Facebook Inc. or Alphabet Inc.’s Google, which serve as marketplaces for businesses with less reach of their own.....Eventually, Amazon could become the ultimate platform for retail, the “retail cloud” upon which countless other online retail businesses are built....Think of Amazon as an umbrella company composed of disconnected and sometimes competing businesses, though critically they can access common infrastructure, including the retail platform and cloud services.

Ultimately, these smaller businesses must feed the core mission. Amazon’s video business isn’t just its own potential profit center; it’s also a way to keep people in Amazon’s world longer, where they spend more money,

What Amazon Can’t Do
Ultimately, the strategies that allow Amazon to continue growing will also be its limitation. “If the platform needs to be one-size-fits-all across many, many different product categories, it becomes difficult to create specific experiences for different kinds of products,”
contra-Amazon  Amazon  strengths  data_driven  instant_gratification  customer_experience  platforms  one-size-fits-all  limitations  Jeff_Bezos  weaknesses  commoditization  third-party  Christopher_Mims 
january 2018 by jerryking
Amazon’s Next Big Move: Take Over the Mall
November 14, 2016 | Technology Review | by Nicholas Carr .

What’s Amazon doing with Amazon Books?...Wall Street analysts and tech writers have filled the void with conjecture. The stores are all about selling gadgets, goes one popular idea, with the books there just to lure customers. The stores are data-gathering machines, goes another, enabling Amazon to extend its tracking of customers into the physical world. Or maybe the company’s secret plan is to use the stores to promote its cloud computing operation, Amazon Web Services, to other retailers....The theories are intriguing, and they may contain bits of truth. But the real impetus behind the stores is probably much simpler: Amazon wants to sell more books....Not long ago, the common wisdom held that Amazon would remake the book business in its own image. Its Web store would kill off bookstores, and its Kindle would render physical books obsolete. ...
“Pure-play Web retailing is not sustainable.”Bezos underestimated the allure of bricks and paper. With his bookstore chain, he now seems to be admitting that if Amazon is to expand its share of the book market, it will need to invest in bricks as well as bits....Having come up short in its plan to supplant books and bookstores with digital alternatives, the company is taking its revenge by attacking traditional bookshops on their own turf. Unlike the mom-and-pop independents, or even the struggling Barnes & Noble chain, Amazon has the scale and the cash required to wage a war of attrition. It can sustain losses on its stores for a long time.....Amazon Books may be just the vanguard of a much broader push into brick-and-mortar retailing by the company. In October, the Wall Street Journal revealed that Amazon is planning to open a chain of convenience stores, mainly for groceries, along with drive-in depots where consumers will be able to pick up merchandise ordered online. It has also begun rolling out small “pop-up” stores to hawk its electronic devices. It already has more than two dozen such kiosks in malls around the country, and dozens more are said to be in the works.

Even after 20 years of rapid growth, e-commerce still accounts for less than 10 percent of total retail sales. And now the rise of mobile computing places new constraints on Web stores.At the same time, the smartphone, with its apps, its messaging platforms, and its constant connectivity, gives retailers more ways to communicate with and influence customers, even when they’re shopping in stores. This is why the big trend in retailing today is toward “omnichannel” strategies, which blend physical stores, Web stores, and mobile apps in a way that makes the most of the convenience of smartphones and overcomes their limitations.....Beyond its expertise in Web sales, Amazon brings distinctive strengths to an omnichannel operation. Its vast, efficient network of warehouses and distribution centers can supply outlets and process returns. It has, thanks to the largesse and patience of its investors, a reservoir of cheap capital that it can draw on to fund a building spree. And it has a much-admired brand. What Amazon lacks is experience in the touchy-feely world of traditional retailing (e.g. merchandising??). The company’s proficiency in software and data crunching is unquestioned. Its people skills are another matter..... another of the store’s goals: to promote the Prime program, which is central to Amazon’s strategy of locking in customers....I feel let down. I had convinced myself that I was going to witness something fresh and unexpected at Amazon Books. What I found was an annex to a website—a store that, despite the bricks and paper, retains the coldness of the virtual.
e-commerce  shopping_malls  Amazon  Amazon_Prime  books  sterile  soulless  Nicholas_Carr  Amazon_Books  bricks-and-mortar  Jeff_Bezos  pure-plays  bookstores  omnichannel  strengths  smartphones  mobile_applications  loyalty_management  impersonal  people_skills  Achilles’_heel  weaknesses  convenience_stores  pop-ups  kiosks  voids  merchandising  AWS  physical_world  mom-and-pop  coldness  touchy-feely  cyberphysical  emotional_connections  empathy_vacuum  Amazon_Go  cashierless  locked_in  distribution_centres 
february 2017 by jerryking
The path to enlightenment and profit starts inside the office
(Feb. 2, 2016): The Financial Times | John Thornhill.

Competition used to be easy. That is in theory, if not always in practice. Until recently, most competent companies had a clear idea of who their rivals were, how to compete and on what field to fight.

One of the starkest - and scariest - declarations of competitive intent came from Komatsu, the Japanese construction equipment manufacturer, in the 1970s. As employees trooped into work they would walk over doormats exhorting: "Kill Caterpillar!". Companies benchmarked their operations and market share against their competitors to see where they stood.

But that strategic clarity has blurred in so many industries today to the point of near-invisibility thanks to the digital revolution and globalisation. Flying blind, companies seem happier to cut costs and buy back their shares than to invest purposefully for the future. Take the European telecommunications sector. Not long ago most telecoms companies were national monopolies with little, or no, competition. Today, it is hard to predict where the next threat is going to erupt.

WhatsApp, the California-based messaging service, was founded in 2009 and only registered in most companies' consciousness when it was acquired by Facebook for more than $19bn in 2014. Yet in its short life WhatsApp has taken huge bites out of the lucrative text messaging markets. Today, WhatsApp has close to 1bn users sending 30bn messages a day. The global SMS text messaging market is just 20bn a day.

Car manufacturers are rapidly wising up to the threat posed by new generation tech firms, such as Tesla, Google and Uber, all intent on developing "apps on wheels". Chinese and Indian companies, little heard of a few years ago, are bouncing out of their own markets to emerge as bold global competitors.

As the driving force of capitalism , competition gives companies a purpose, a mission and a sense of direction. But how can companies compete in such a shape-shifting environment? There are perhaps two (partial) answers.

The first is to do everything to understand the technological changes that are transforming the world, to identify the threats and opportunities early.

Gavin Patterson , chief executive of BT, the British telecoms group, says one of the functions of corporate leaders is to scan the horizon as never before. "As a CEO you have to be on the bridge looking outwards, looking for signs that something is happening, trying to anticipate it before it becomes a danger."

To that end, BT has opened innovation "scouting teams" in Silicon Valley and Israel, and tech partnerships with universities in China, the US, Abu Dhabi, India and the UK.

But even if you foresee the danger, it does not mean you can deal with it. After all, Kodak invented the first digital camera but failed to exploit the technology. The incentive structures of many companies are to minimise risk rather than maximise opportunity. Innovation is often a young company's game.

The second answer is that companies must look as intensively inwards as they do outwards (e.g. opposing actions). Well-managed companies enjoy many advantages: strong brands, masses of consumer data, valuable historic data sets, networks of smart people and easy access to capital. But what is often lacking is the ambition that marks out the new tech companies, their ability to innovate rapidly and their extraordinary connection with consumers. In that sense, the main competition of so many established companies lies within their own organisations.

Larry Page, co-founder of Google, constantly urges his employees to keep being radical. In his Founders' Letter of 2013, he warned that companies tend to grow comfortable doing what they have always done and only ever make incremental change. "This . . . leads to irrelevance over time," he wrote.

Google operates a 70/20/10 rule where employees are encouraged to spend 70 per cent of their time on their core business, 20 per cent on working with another team and 10 per cent on moonshots. How many traditional companies focus so much on radical ventures?

Vishal Sikka, chief executive of the Indian IT group Infosys, says that internal constraints can often be far more damaging than external threats. "The traditional definition of competition is irrelevant. We are increasingly competing against ourselves," he says.

Quoting Siddhartha by the German writer Hermann Hesse, Mr Sikka argues that companies remain the masters of their own salvation whatever the market pressures: "Knowledge can be communicated. Wisdom cannot." He adds: "Every company has to find its own unique wisdom." [This wisdom reference is reminiscent of Paul Graham's advice to do things that don't scale].

john.thornhill@ft.com
ambitions  brands  breakthroughs  BT  bureaucracies  competition  complacency  constraints  Fortune_500  incentives  incrementalism  Infosys  innovation  introspection  irrelevance  large_companies  LBMA  messaging  mission-driven  Mondelez  moonshots  opposing_actions  organizational_culture  outward_looking  Paul_Graham  peripheral_vision  radical  risk-avoidance  scouting  smart_people  start_ups  staying_hungry  tacit_knowledge  technological_change  threats  uniqueness  unscalability  weaknesses  WhatsApp  wisdom  digital_cameras  digital_revolution  historical_data 
april 2016 by jerryking
What a Year of Job Rejections Taught Me About Pitching Myself
SEPTEMBER 09, 2015 | HBR | Nina Mufleh.
[send to Nick Patel]
After sending out hundreds of copies of my résumé to dozens of companies over the last year, I realized that I was getting nowhere because my approach was wrong....How could a career that ranged from working with royalty to Fortune 500 brands and startups not pique the curiosity of any hiring managers?

As a marketer, I decided to re-frame the challenge. Instead of thinking as a job applicant, I had to think of myself as a product and identify ways to create demand around hiring me. I applied everything I knew about marketing and storytelling to build a campaign that would show Silicon Valley companies the kind of value I would bring to their teams.

The experiment was a report that I created for Airbnb that highlighted the promise and potential of expanding to the Middle East, a market that I am extremely familiar with and until recently they had not focused on. I spent a couple of days gathering data about the tourism industry and the company’s current footprint in the market, and identified strategic opportunities for them there.

I released the report on Twitter and copied Airbnb’s founders and leadership team. Behind the scenes, I also shared it by email with many personal and professional contacts and encouraged them to share it if they thought it was interesting — most did, as did some of the top VCs, entrepreneurs and many peers around the world....What I realize in hindsight is probably one of the most important lessons of my career so far. The project highlighted the qualities I wanted to show to recruiters; more importantly, it also addressed one of the main weaknesses they saw in me....What the report helped me do was show, not tell, my value beyond their doubts. It refocused my perceived weakness into a strength: an international perspective with the promise of understanding and entering new markets. And though none of the roles that I interviewed for in the last two months focused on expansion, by addressing and challenging the weakness, I was able to re-frame the conversation around my strengths....asking yourself a different version of that question is going to make you better prepared for any conversation with a recruiter, a potential client, or even a potential investor....not “What is my weakness?” but rather “What do they perceive as a weakness in my background?”
Airbnb  campaigns  career_paths  creating_demand  Fortune_500  founders  HBR  hindsight  inbound_marketing  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  Middle_East  networking  personal_branding  pitches  problem_framing  reframing  rejections  self-promotion  social_media  strengths  value_propositions  via:enochko  weaknesses 
september 2015 by jerryking
Conservatives can only win if they own up to their weaknesses - The Globe and Mail
BRUCE ANDERSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jul. 09, 2015

Losing political campaigns. They are, the cup half-full people say, learning moments.

Each campaign has its own dynamics; losers lose for different reasons. The lessons from a defeat aren’t always portable. But if there’s one lesson that should only be learned once it is this: If there’s a chance you’re going to lose, lose with your eyes open. Get a handle on what’s going wrong, and try everything you can to turn things around.

It sounds obvious. Shouldn’t have to be said. But you’d be amazed.

Political parties are prisoners of hierarchy. Leaders lay down a strategy, and everyone else is encouraged to acknowledge that it is perfectly formed.
political_campaigns  Conservative_Party  pundits  elections  Stephen_Harper  weaknesses  truth-telling  Canadian  delusions  self-delusions  Bruce_Anderson  Federal_Election_2015 
july 2015 by jerryking
The Lessons for Finance in the GE Capital Retreat - NYTimes.com
APRIL 10, 2015 | NYT |By PETER EAVIS.

More than 10 years ago, the kinds of investors who seek out weak companies were circulating presentations on Wall Street that argued that General Electric’s enormous lending business was a ticking time bomb.

The financial crisis of 2008 proved those skeptics right, and on Friday, they appeared to have the final laugh. General Electric announced that it was selling most of the loans inside its financial division, GE Capital, leaving a G.E. that will be dominated by industrial businesses.
GE_Capital  GE  exits  financial_services  short_selling  weaknesses 
april 2015 by jerryking
5 Things Super Lucky People Do
Mar 17, 2014 | Inc. Magazine | BY Kevin Daum.

1. Play to your strengths. So much time and energy is wasted trying to do things you probably don't do very well. Author and Inc. columnist Lewis Schiff learned from his survey of incredibly wealthy people that they got that way by focusing only on what they do best. Everything else you can delegate, or you could find a partner to compensate for your weaknesses. That way, you will shine where you excel and attract opportunity. Good things come to those who emanate success.

2. Prepare in advance. Unlucky people often get that way because they're reactive and unprepared for whatever comes. People who have stored food and water in their basements aren't lucky to find themselves prepared when disaster strikes, they used forethought to make sure they had what they might need just in case. I personally scoff at this horrible recent trend of disparaging business plans because things change constantly. The point of a business plan isn't to follow it no matter what, it's to establish a structure for smart decision making that allows you to succeed no matter what the future might bring.

3. Start early. Some people seem to have more hours in the day. I myself don't need more than six hours of sleep and am constantly finding ways to be more efficient. I use that extra time to start my projects well in advance. My rewards aren't dependent upon the time of day that I take action. (This column is being written at 3 a.m.) But it does matter that I'm beginning to explore projects I expect to complete months or years from now. So many people only want to put their energy into things that provide immediate gratification. The most fortunate people I know are the ones who planted seeds early and now reap that harvest of happiness.

4. Connect with as many people as possible. The key to success is access to opportunity. Access comes from influence. If you're influential, people will come and bring opportunities to you. The bigger your following, the more powerful your influence. The only way to build a big following is to provide value to many people. You have to provide the sort of value that will cause people to spread your thoughts far and wide, attributing credit to you when they do. Are you creating that kind of value? If not, figure how you can.

5. Follow up. Opportunities often come and go because people don't respond in a timely manner. I'm always amazed when people ask me for something and I respond only to never hear from them again. Three months ago, a young woman asked me if I hire interns or assistants. I replied immediately saying I'm always willing to consider hiring people who bring value to my work. I asked her how she thought she could enhance what I could do. I never heard from her again. Perhaps she now considers herself unlucky that opportunity doesn't come her way. I believe that following up is often more powerful and impressive than the act of initiating.
tips  luck  Communicating_&_Connecting  opportunities  JCK  focus  preparation  readiness  value_creation  networking  following_up  self-starters  overachievers  strengths  affirmations  forethought  weaknesses  individual_initiative  unprepared  chance  contingency  partnerships  high-achieving  early_risers 
march 2014 by jerryking
Why Putin Doesn’t Respect Us - NYTimes.com
MARCH 4, 2014 | NYT |Thomas L. Friedman.

The Soviet Union died because Communism could not provide rising standards of living, and its collapse actually unleashed boundless human energy all across Eastern Europe and Russia. A wise Putin would have redesigned Russia so its vast human talent could take advantage of all that energy. He would be fighting today to get Russia into the European Union, not to keep Ukraine out....I don’t want to go to war with Putin, but it is time we expose his real weakness and our real strength. That, though, requires a long-term strategy — not just fulminating on “Meet the Press.” It requires going after the twin pillars of his regime: oil and gas. Just as the oil glut of the 1980s, partly engineered by the Saudis, brought down global oil prices to a level that helped collapse Soviet Communism, we could do the same today to Putinism by putting the right long-term policies in place. That is by investing in the facilities to liquefy and export our natural gas bounty (provided it is extracted at the highest environmental standards) and making Europe, which gets 30 percent of its gas from Russia, more dependent on us instead. I’d also raise our gasoline tax, put in place a carbon tax and a national renewable energy portfolio standard — all of which would also help lower the global oil price (and make us stronger, with cleaner air, less oil dependence and more innovation).
Crimea  communism  disrespect  long-term  natural_gas  oil_industry  Russia  Soviet_Union  strategic_thinking  Tom_Friedman  Vladimir_Putin  weaknesses 
march 2014 by jerryking
Flight Risks
November 2005 | Worth | by Dan Rosen.

Angel investors often get caught up with charismatic and passionate entrepreneurs. It‘s the joy and the danger of angel investing. For angel investing to work, investors and entrepreneurs need that shared passion and vision. But angel investing is not for the faint of heart. Seedstage investments tie up your money for a long time because you are investing early in the life of a company whose typical gestation period is six to eight years. No individual can do (nor does a relatively modest investment justify) the depth of analysis and due diligence that professional investors such as venture capitalists conduct; that often makes decisions difficult. And the likelihood that several additional rounds of financing will follow your initial investment and dilute your stake causes a large financial risk....Know your strengths, weaknesses and desires. If they don‘t match angel investing, don’t do it. If they do, have Fun.
angels  due_diligence  illiquidity  start_ups  financial_risk  risks  passions  strengths  early-stage  weaknesses  self-awareness 
march 2013 by jerryking
The Science of Interviewing
July-August 1990 | HBR | T.J. Rodgers is founder, president, CEO, and a director of Cypress

You can't hire quality people without a systematic approach to in interviewing. Four basic rules guide our interview and evaluation process.
1. Use the big guns.
2. Make interviews tough and demanding-even for people you know you want.
3. Interviews should lead to a detailed assessments of strengths and weaknesses, not vague impressions.
4. Check for cultural fit.
HBR  interviews  organizational_culture  assessments_&_evaluations  hiring  strengths  weaknesses  cultural_fit  howto  questions  stressful 
august 2012 by jerryking
What Makes a Top Executive?
1983 | Psychology Today | by Morgan W.McCall, Jr. and Michael M. Lombardo.
Executives, like the rest of us, are a patchwork of strengths and weaknesses....The fatal flaws of executives who failed to live up to their potential.

1. Insensitive to others: abrasive, intimidating style.
2. Cold, aloof, arrogant
3. Betrayal of Trust—failure to meet commitments.
4. Overly ambitious—plays politics, pushes too hard to get ahead.
5. Failure to handle specific performance problems—failure to handle problems then not admit the problem, try to cover up or shift blame.
6. Overmanaging: unable to delegate or build a team.
7. Unable to select and develop an effective staff.
8. Unable to think broadly or strategically—too much attention to detail and minor technical problems.
9. Unable to adapt to a boss with a different style.
10. Overdependence on one’s boss or mentor.

These flaws matter because:
1. Strengths become weaknesses
2. Deficiencies eventually matter
3. Success goes to their heads
4. Events conspire

Part of handling adversity lies in knowing what not to do. Know which behavioural patterns will colleagues and superiors consider intolerable...Seek diversity in the forms of success.
executive_management  CEOs  movingonup  career_ending_moves  leadership  listening  Myers-Briggs  managing_people  EQ  Managing_Your_Career  personality_types/traits  leadership_development  character_traits  strengths  weaknesses  people_skills 
july 2012 by jerryking
Starting Up in High Gear
July-August 2000 | HBR |An Interview with Vinod Khosla by David Champion and Nicholas G. Carr.

To create the kind of new wealth you’re talking about, we’re going to have to see massive investments in information technology. Where’s the money going to come from?

It’s going to come out of corporate budgets. Companies invest wherever they’re going to get the biggest returns, and right now that’s IT. Look at the trend in capital expenditures. Twenty years ago, information technology accounted for about 10% of capital expenditures in the United States. ...
Today, if you have a plan for a new business, you circulate it in the venture community and you get funded in a week. What you don’t get is an honest, painstaking critique. What are the downsides in your plan? What are the shortcomings? What are the weak links? The strengths of your idea get a lot of attention, but the weaknesses get ignored—and ultimately it’s the weaknesses of your plan that will kill you. A start-up is only as strong as its weakest link....
The first thing we focused on was getting the right set of people for the company—the right gene pool. We started out on the technical end. Pradeep had helped architect the Ultrasparc processor at Sun, so he had strong skills in building technical architectures and could apply those skills to routers. But he needed somebody with experience in building and operating an IP network, and he needed somebody who’d done operating systems software for routers and somebody who’d done protocols for routers. So we drew out a map that said, “Here are the ten different areas of expertise we need.” Then we made a list of the companies doing the best work in each area, and we listed the five people in each company who would make good targets. We went after those people, and piece by piece we assembled a multidisciplinary team that could make Juniper a leader.
IT  interviews  HBR  Kleiner_Perkins  start_ups  large_companies  management_consulting  Vinod_Khosla  executive_search  shortcomings  weaknesses  new_businesses  CAPEX  weak_links  Nicholas_Carr  talent_acquisition  gene_pool  expertise  team_risk  wealth_creation  cross-pollination  interdisciplinary  teams  protocols 
june 2012 by jerryking
Managing Oneself
January 2005 | HBR | Peter Drucker.

We live in an age of unprecedented opportunity: If you’ve got ambition and smarts, you can rise to the top of your chosen profession, regardless of where you started out.

But with opportunity comes responsibility. Companies today aren’t managing their employees’ careers; knowledge workers must, effectively, be their own chief executive officers. It’s up to you to carve out your place, to know when to change course, and to keep yourself engaged and productive during a work life that may span some 50 years. To do those things well, you’ll need to cultivate a deep understanding of yourself—not only what your strengths and weaknesses are but also how you learn, how you work with others, what your values are, and where you can make the greatest contribution. Because only when you operate from strengths can you achieve true excellence.
howto  Peter_Drucker  knowledge_workers  Managing_Your_Career  self-analysis  introspection  strengths  weaknesses  self-awareness  It's_up_to_me 
march 2012 by jerryking
The dark side of mentoring -
July 1, 2011 |FT.com|| by Mike Southon. Mentoring should never
be regarded as a revenue opportunity--it should always be provided for
free. A mentoring relationship should be a 2-way process, with the
person giving the advice learning as much, if not more than the person
seeking it. The greatest learning pt. for mentors is always about
themselves....Learn one's strengths and weaknesses. Maturity &
self-awareness are essential prerequisites for giving measured advice to
others....Most mentors have little or no formal training and are
therefore unprepared when the mentees do not listen to their sage advice
– or let them down in other ways. It's important for mentors to adopt
an air of professional detachment at all times and not try to intervene
unnecessarily. Never allow the relationship or the problems of the
mentee to adversely affecting the personal life of the mentor....Study
the techniques of counselling in case they find themselves with a mentee
who is disturbed & manipulative
mentoring  challenges  strengths  weaknesses  maturity  self-awareness  advice  unprepared  dark_side 
july 2011 by jerryking
Zadie Smith's rules for writers | Books | guardian.co.uk
22 Feb. 2010 / guardian.co.uk/ Here are Zadie Smith's golden
rules for writing:
1 As a child, make sure you read a lot of books. Spend more time doing
this than anything else.
2 As an adult, try to read your own work as a stranger would read it,
better still, as an enemy would.
3 Don't romanticise your "vocation". You can either write good sentences
or you can't. What matters is what is left on the pg.
4 Avoid your weaknesses. But do this without dismissing the things you
don't excel at.
5 Leave a decent space of time between writing something and editing it.
6 Avoid cliques, gangs, groups. Crowds won't make your writing any
better than it is.
7 Work disconnected from the ­Web.
8 Protect the time and space in which you write. Keep everybody away
from it, even the people who are most important to you.
9 Don't confuse honours with achievement.
10 Tell the truth through whichever veil comes to hand – but tell it.
Accept the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied.
writing  advice  writers  tips  reading  books  quotes  rules_of_the_game  affirmations  weaknesses  truth-telling  restlessness  dissatisfaction  golden_rules 
may 2011 by jerryking
Patrick Lencioni: The Most Important Leadership Trait You Shun - WSJ.com
JUNE 22, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By PATRICK LENCIONI.
Writes about vulnerability, the ability to be genuinely honest about
one's weaknesses, mistakes and needs for help. Whether we're talking
about leadership, teamwork or client service, nothing inspires trust in
another human being as much as vulnerability . There is just something
immensely attractive and inspiring about humility and graciousness.
leadership  Patrick_Lencioni  personal_growth  life_skills  humility  weaknesses  authenticity  trustworthiness  grace  vulnerabilities 
june 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Columnist - The Humble Hound - NYTimes.com
April 8, 2010 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS. Research suggests that
extremely self-confident leaders--the boardroom lion model of
leadership--can also be risky. Charismatic C.E.O.’s often produce
volatile company performances--swinging for the home run and sometimes
end up striking out. They make more daring acquisitions, shift into new
fields and abruptly change strategies. Jim Collins, author of “Good to
Great” and “How the Mighty Fall,” celebrates a different sort of leader.
Reliably successful leaders who combine “extreme personal humility with
intense professional will”--a humble hound model of leadership.
Characteristics: focuses on metacognition — thinking about thinking —
and building external scaffolding devices to compensate for weaknesses;
spends more time seeing than analyzing; construct thinking teams; avoids
the seduction (the belief) that one magic move will change everything;
the faith in perpetual restructuring; the tendency to replace questions
with statements at meetings.
David_Brooks  Peter_Drucker  leadership  single_action_bias  CEOs  self-confidence  leaders  charisma  thinking  humility  Jim_Collins  cognitive_skills  self-awareness  metacognition  proclivities  weaknesses  wishful_thinking  willpower 
april 2010 by jerryking
"Outsmarting China's Start-Arounds"
07/07/06 | Far Eastern Economic Review | by Steve Ellis and
Orit Gadiesh. The best way for global firms to defend core markets,
then, is to focus on areas where Chinese firms still have a lot to
learn. (1) Most important, of course, is building customer loyalty. (2)
Second is innovation. (3) Third, multinationals need strategies for
developing talent that optimize diversity in skills and experience.
Bain  China  competitive_strategy  multinationals  weaknesses  customer_loyalty 
march 2010 by jerryking
The Uber Mentor, Mentors Article
Sept. 1, 2002 | Inc. Article | By Elaine Appleton Grant.
If you needed life-changing advice and could make only one phone call,
who would be on the other end? For some, the answer is Peter Drucker.
He listens carefully and asks a lot of questions.
He brings a wealth of knowledge to bear in conversations with his
advisees. He's a Renaissance man who is incredibly well-read, draws upon
an enormous breadth of experience, and has an astonishing memory. He
both defines the landscape and identifies what Buford calls "the void"
in that landscape -- what is needed now. Finally, he works only with
those people who take his counsel seriously and act on it.

He encourages people and helps them believe in themselves. A Drucker
truism: a good mentor or manager builds on people's strengths and helps
them make their weaknesses irrelevant.
advice  competitive_landscape  life-changing  mentoring  opportunities  Peter_Drucker  questions  Renaissance_man  voids  weaknesses 
december 2009 by jerryking
You're a Success, Now Get Down to Work - WSJ.com
AUGUST 20, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by ALEXANDRA LEVIT.
Examining where you might have shortcomings can make or break a career.
Becoming as successful as you can be -- after you've already climbed
part of the ladder -- means you need two things. For starters, you need
outstanding people skills: Listen carefully, think before you speak,
reciprocate favors and manage conflicts diplomatically. Second, you
must regularly take a hard look at yourself and address your weak
points. For example, if you have a communication issue with one person
or a group of people, step away from the blame game and ask yourself,
"How can I be better?" Make sure people are honest with you by
requesting feedback anonymously and confidentially.

Remember: "Strong leaders don't coast."
Achilles’_heel  Alexandra_Levit  blaming_fingerpointing  emotional_intelligence  EQ  high-achieving  life_skills  Managing_Your_Career  movingonup  overachievers  people_skills  self-analysis  self-awareness  self-improvement  self-reflective  shortcomings  success  up-and-comers  weaknesses 
august 2009 by jerryking
Annals of Innovation: How David Beats Goliath: Reporting & Essays: The New Yorker
May 11, 2009 |The New Yorker | by Malcolm Gladwell. How
underdogs create opportunities by first understanding their strengths,
weaknesses, and the rules of the game, and then changing the rules....To Gladwell, the story illustrated how traditions become blind spots. “Playing insurgent basketball did not guarantee victory. It was simply the best chance an underdog had of beating Goliath,” he wrote. “And yet somehow that lesson has escaped the basketball establishment.” The anecdote became the opening passage of the book David and Goliath, another fixture on bestseller lists....A few years ago, Ranadivé wrote a paper arguing that even the Federal Reserve ought to make its decisions in real time—not once every month or two. “Everything in the world is now real time,” he said. “So when a certain type of shoe isn’t selling at your corner shop, it’s not six months before the guy in China finds out. It’s almost instantaneous, thanks to my software. The world runs in real time, but government runs in batch. Every few months, it adjusts. Its mission is to keep the temperature comfortable in the economy, and, if you were to do things the government’s way in your house, then every few months you’d turn the heater either on or off, overheating or underheating your house.” Ranadivé argued that we ought to put the economic data that the Fed uses into a big stream, and write a computer program that sifts through those data, the moment they are collected, and make immediate, incremental adjustments to interest rates and the money supply. “It can all be automated,” he said. “Look, we’ve had only one soft landing since the Second World War. Basically, we’ve got it wrong every single time.”
anecdotal  basketball  batch_processing  blind_spots  books  coaching  creating_opportunities  decision_making  economic_data  innovation  interest_rates  Malcolm_Gladwell  massive_data_sets  money_supply  overlooked_opportunities  rainmaking  real-time  rules_of_the_game  strategy  strengths  Tibco  underdogs  U.S._Federal_Reserve  Vivek_Ranadivé  weaknesses 
may 2009 by jerryking

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