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jerryking : wetlands   3

Port Lands: $1.2b of Trilateral Funding Unlocks Revitalization | Urban Toronto
June 28, 2017 3:50 pm | by Stefan Novakovic.

Three levels of government are committing $1.185 billion of new funding to remake what Waterfront Toronto describes as "one of North America's largest underused urban areas." The investment will fund the much-needed Port Lands Flood Protection Project (PLFPP), unlocking the ambitious reinvention of the 365 hectare (880 acre) Port Lands.

While the mostly vacant and partly de-industrialized Port Lands have long been fodder for blue-sky thinking—once touted as the site of a potential Olympic bid, and more recently Expo 2025—some 290 hectares (715 acres) of the area are currently at risk of flooding. Any visions of the future are contingent on the funding that was finally secured today. Joined by Mayor John Tory and Premier Kathleen Wynne, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau lead the way in announcing a Federal contribution of up to $384 million......Two new naturalized outlets for the Don River will be created, with the waterway—surrounded by the river beds' flood-protecting greenery—carving out the new Villiers Island, which is envisioned as a dense urban entry point to the Port Lands.

Alongside the naturalized river beds, 13 acres of wetlands will be introduced throughout the Port Lands, creating a resilient and sustainable urban environment. In total, 29 hectares of naturalized greens are are planned—including coastal wetlands—as well as 16 acres of parkland, and 14 acres of in-water aquatic habitat. The new waterways will also add 1,000 metres of naturalized river.
Waterfront_Toronto  revitalization  waterfronts  John_Tory  Justin_Trudeau  Kathleen_Wynne  Toronto  floods  Don_River  Port_Lands  wetlands  flood_protection  property_development 
june 2017 by jerryking
Taylor Creek Park: A ribbon of otherness - The Globe and Mail
MASSIMO COMMANDUCCI
Globe and Mail Update
Published Thursday, Dec. 23, 2010

Running from Dawes Road in the east, just north of Danforth Avenue, to the Don River in the west, the park is an almost-four-kilometre-long stretch of semi-wilderness, part of the disconnected ravine system in the city's east end. Take away a golf course here, a roadway there, and the park would easily link Scarborough's Warden Woods and E.T. Seton Park on the other side of the Don Valley Parkway.

Like those two ravines, Taylor Creek Park follows the path of a river. Taylor-Massey Creek, named after two prominent Toronto families, starts near Highway 401 and runs south along an undignified, concrete-lined course through Scarborough, picking up all kinds of debris and pollutants along the way. But at least it resembles a creek again by the time it reaches the park, bending this way and that, creating pools and eddies for the resident crawfish and ducks.

Unlike a traditional city green space such as High Park, with its formal borders, restaurant, concrete-lined pond and even a zoo, Taylor Creek Park is a wonderfully vague, meandering affair. In some places, homes and buildings loom directly above the ravine - it's often hard to know where the park ends and private property begins; in others, the greenery stretches north and south for hundreds of metres, elbowing its way through the city.

The marshes that line both sides of the creek are stuffed with cattails and willow trees and are home to dragonflies and red-winged blackbirds that complain loudly when joggers or cyclists get too close to their nests. In the eighties, many of the marshes were drained to control mosquitoes and to prevent the flooding of picnic areas and the park's sole paved path; fortunately, the city parks department now follows a policy of naturalization - a combination of habitat restoration and benign neglect - and the wetlands are back.
Don_River  green_spaces  habitats  parks  rivers  ravines  Toronto  wetlands  wilderness 
july 2011 by jerryking

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