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jerryking : wireless_spectrum   7

5G Wireless Will Redraw the Wireless Industry Map: Who Stands to Lose? - WSJ
March 25, 2018 | WSJ | By Christopher Mims.

Key takeaways:

• 5G will take a long, long time to deploy into urban areas, and even longer in rural areas

• Wireless network operators are going to spend untold billions creating the foundation for the future of wireless broadband networks

• 5G is The Final Solution for broadband wireless, finally delivering the promise of 3G and 4G through breaking the linkage between network capacity and network coverage.
5G  telecommunications  wireless  wireless_networks  wireless_spectrum  wireline  generational_change  Christopher_Mims 
march 2018 by jerryking
Crovitz: 'Spectrum Auctions'—There's an App for That - WSJ.com
July 18, 2011 | WSJ | By L. GORDON CROVITZ

Spectrum Auctions? There's an App for That
It only took 50 years for the feds to realize that economist Ronald Coase was right.
L._Gordon_Crovtiz  economists  auctions  wireless  wireless_networks  Ronald_Coase  wireless_spectrum  Coase's_Law 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Superball Economy - WSJ.com
March 3, 2003 | WSJ | By ANDY KESSLER.

Design is cheaper. If you look closely, Silicon Valley has very few manufacturers left. Chips are made in Taiwan, boards assembled in China or Thailand. We are now a Valley of designers. And there are lots of programmers and chip-heads and communications protocol folks walking the streets willing to work for much cheaper than three years ago. Office space is plentiful. Word has it there is space available for 50 cents per square foot per month, down from $12.

Bandwidth is cheaper. Global Crossing spent $12 billion on undersea fiber optics that someone is going to buy for $250 million. WorldCom and others have strung the U.S. with more fiber than in Frosted Mini-Wheats. And it won't be just for phone calls. Find companies that use that cheap bandwidth, and you'll find the boom.

Video is cheaper. Napster music sharing was child's play compared to what is next. Hours of video can be captured, stored and shared with today's cheap PCs and broadband lines. Jack Valenti, call your office.

Wireless data is cheaper. The Federal Communications Commission set aside frequencies for hospitals and microwave ovens that might interfere with phones or radar. This Industrial, Scientific and Medical block of spectrum is known as the junk band. While stupid telecom companies overbid for spectrum for third generation 3G cell phone devices, clever engineers figured out how to hop around the junk band -- letting out-of-work programmers surf job listings at Starbucks. Intel is putting these radios in many of their chips.

Distributed computing is cheaper. Google uses 12,000 cheap PCs to log the Internet so you can look up your neighbor and figure out how much she makes. Even distributed programming is cheaper. Microsoft's biggest problem is far-flung programmers creating operating systems like Linux at home in their pajamas. Bill Gates is reportedly all over the Valley asking for help to combat this "Open Source" nuisance.

About the only thing not cheap is capital. Venture capitalists are stingy, the IPO window is closed, and stocks are at four-year lows. Hmmm. Forget that last boom, it's ancient history. Look for new products not possible or too expensive three years ago. Slam down your new Superballs and be ready.
Andy_Kessler  Silicon_Valley  economic_downturn  protocols  recessions  optimism  design  bandwidth  open_source  new_products  distributed_computing  venture_capital  IPOs  inexpensive  cheap_revolution  abundance  economic_dynamism  leaps_of_faith  FCC  overpaid  wireless_spectrum 
may 2012 by jerryking
Jenkins: Wi-Fi and the Mobile Meltdown - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 18, 2011, 7:00 P.M. ET

Wi-Fi and the Mobile Meltdown
Hotspots may be the workaround for the spectrum 'shortage.'

...the biggest deliverer of data to smart phones and related devices isn't any of the wireless carriers. It's Wi-Fi, which accounts for 33% compared to 8% for AT&T and 18% for Verizon.

Hmm.

Look at your AT&T iPhone in Manhattan. You're getting four bars and yet broadband is agonizingly slow because too many users are trying to jam bits through at the same time. Look again. Five, 10, 20 or more Wi-Fi networks are also in range of your device. Altogether, within the radius of a single cell tower might be dozens or hundreds of Wi-Fi transceivers.

Hmm.

Virtually every mobile device today comes with Wi-Fi capability. The first iPad was Wi-Fi only. Amazon's new Kindle Fire tablet will, at least in the first installment, be a Wi-Fi-only device.

Hmm.
By HOLMAN W. JENKINS, JR.
Wi-Fi  mobile  wireless_spectrum  scarcity  Holman_Jenkins  hotspots 
october 2011 by jerryking
Technological Opportunities, Job Creation, and Economic Growth | The White House
June 28, 2010 | New America Foundation | Larry Summers. Opening
up spectrum creates a foundation for new private sector investment and
economic activity – in mobile broadband and a range of other high-value
uses – that would not have been possible without the coordinating and
organizing role of govt. But there is another reason why reforming
spectrum policy is important. Mancur Olson wrote about the tendency of
stable societies to become sclerotic as entrenched interests blocked
progress. Similarly, Alexander Gerschenkron commented on the advantages
of “economic backwardness”: Countries late to industrialize bypass-with
an open canvas-many of the dead ends and outdated practices that
encumbered early industrializers. Spectrum policy reform is important
because it addresses a cutting-edge area where we would be disadvantaged
because our early lead in developing and deploying technologies of
yesterday leave us ill-equipped for tomorrow's technological challenges.
Larry_Summers  wireless  wireless_networks  wireless_spectrum  Mancur_Olson  cronyism  job_creation  sclerotic  state-as-facilitator  leapfrogging  entrenched_interests 
july 2010 by jerryking

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