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Donald Trump Poisons the World
JUNE 2, 2017 | The New York Times | David Brooks.

This week, two of Donald Trump’s top advisers, H. R. McMaster and Gary Cohn, wrote the following passage in The Wall Street Journal: “The president embarked on his first foreign trip with a cleareyed outlook that the world is not a ‘global community’ but an arena where nations, nongovernmental actors and businesses engage and compete for advantage.”

That sentence is the epitome of the Trump project. It asserts that selfishness is the sole driver of human affairs. It grows out of a worldview that life is a competitive struggle for gain. It implies that cooperative communities are hypocritical covers for the selfish jockeying underneath.

The essay explains why the Trump people are suspicious of any cooperative global arrangement, like NATO and the various trade agreements. It helps explain why Trump pulled out of the Paris global-warming accord. This essay explains why Trump gravitates toward leaders like Vladimir Putin, the Saudi princes and various global strongmen: They share his core worldview that life is nakedly a selfish struggle for money and dominance.

It explains why people in the Trump White House are so savage to one another. Far from being a band of brothers, their world is a vicious arena where staffers compete for advantage......In the essay, McMaster and Cohn make explicit the great act of moral decoupling woven through this presidency. In this worldview, morality has nothing to do with anything. Altruism, trust, cooperation and virtue are unaffordable luxuries in the struggle of all against all. Everything is about self-interest. David Brooks contends that this philosophy is based on an error about human beings and it leads to self-destructive behavior in all cases.

The error is that it misunderstands what drives human action. Yes, people are self-interested but they are also wired to cooperate....Good leaders like Lincoln, Churchill, Roosevelt and Reagan understand the selfish elements that drive human behavior, but they have another foot in the realm of the moral motivations. They seek to inspire faithfulness by showing good character. They try to motivate action by pointing toward great ideals.

Realist leaders like Trump, McMaster and Cohn seek to dismiss this whole moral realm. By behaving with naked selfishness toward others, they poison the common realm and they force others to behave with naked selfishness toward them........By treating the world simply as an arena for competitive advantage, Trump, McMaster and Cohn sever relationships, destroy reciprocity, erode trust and eviscerate the sense of sympathy, friendship and loyalty that all nations need when times get tough.....George Marshall was no idealistic patsy. He understood that America extends its power when it offers a cooperative hand and volunteers for common service toward a great ideal. Realists reverse that formula. They assume strife and so arouse a volley of strife against themselves.
commonwealth  op-ed  climate_change  Donald_Trump  Gary_Cohn  decoupling  worldviews  WSJ  H.R._McMaster  selfishness  U.S.foreign_policy  Greek  morals  realism  George_Marshall  Marshall_Plan  self-interest  autocrats  Thucydides  David_Brooks  transactional_relationships  national_interests  institutions  international_system  values  human_behavior 
june 2017 by jerryking
Washington Post, Breaking News, Is Also Breaking New Ground - The New York Times
Common Sense
By JAMES B. STEWART MAY 19, 2017
Scoops — and high-quality journalism more generally — are integral to The Post’s business model at a time when the future of digital journalism seemed to be veering toward the lowest common denominator of exploding watermelons and stupid pet tricks.

“Investigative reporting is absolutely critical to our business model,” Mr. Baron told me. “We add value. We tell people what they didn’t already know. We hold government and powerful people and institutions accountable. This cannot happen without financial support. We’re at the point where the public realizes that and is willing to step up and support that work by buying subscriptions.”.........Mr. Huber noted that given the winner-take-all nature of the internet, the sources of scoops are gravitating toward just a few news outlets led by The Times and The Post. Sources (and people who want to “leak”) go to a publication with the most impact; opinion makers and influencers seek the publication with the most sources and scoops — hence the “network effect” so coveted in technology circles, and one well understood by Mr. Bezos.

When I asked Mr. Baron to name one thing that has driven the turnaround, his immediate answer was Mr. Bezos — and not because of his vast fortune.

“The most fundamental thing Jeff did was to change our strategy entirely,” Mr. Baron said. “We were a news organization that focused on the Washington region, so our vision was constrained. Jeff said from the start that wasn’t the right strategy. Our industry had suffered due to the internet, but the internet also brought gifts, and we should recognize that. It made distribution free, which gave us the opportunity to be a national and even international news organization, and we should recognize and take advantage of that.”.....“Today you have to be great at everything,” Mr. Hartman said. “You have to be great at technology. You have to be great at monetization. But one thing I think we’re proving is that if you are, great journalism can be profitable.”
journalism  investigative_journalism  WaPo  scoops  informants  winner-take-all  network_effects  sources  leaks  opinon_makers  digital_strategies  NYT  WSJ  Jeff_Bezos  subscriptions  paywalls  high-quality 
may 2017 by jerryking
The Struggle Inside The Wall Street Journal
FEB. 14, 2017 | The New York Times | David Leonhardt.

The Journal’s newsroom is embroiled in a fight over the paper’s direction.

Many staff members believe that the paper’s top editor, Gerard Baker, previously a feisty conservative commentator, is trying to Murdoch-ize the paper. “There is a systemic issue,” one reporter told me. The dissatisfaction went public last week, with stories in Politico and the Huffington Post. At a staff meeting on Monday, Baker dismissed the criticism as “fake news,” Joe Pompeo and Hadas Gold of Politico reported.

As a longtime reader, admirer and competitor of The Journal, I think the internal critics are right. You can see the news pages becoming more politicized. You can also see The Journal’s staff pushing back, through both great journalism (including exposes on the Trump administration) and quiet insubordination.....The Journal’s opinion pages, of course, have long been conservative. And they have their own tensions: An editor critical of Trump was recently fired, The Atlantic reported. But The Journal’s news pages, like those of The New York Times, The Washington Post and elsewhere, have aspired to objectivity.

One way to understand the fight is through the lens of Fox News. Its former leader, Roger Ailes, knew that the country had become more polarized and that many viewers didn’t want sober objectivity. He also knew that most reporters leaned left, and their beliefs sometimes seeped into coverage.
WSJ  newspapers  Rupert_Murdoch  financial_journalism  biases  WaPo  internal_politics 
february 2017 by jerryking
More Wretched News for Newspapers as Advertising Woes Drive Anxiety - The New York Times
By SYDNEY EMBER OCT. 27, 2016

With print advertising continuing to drop precipitously, you would be hard-pressed to find a newsroom devoid of uncertainty anywhere in the country....Across the country, those working in the newspaper industry are fretting as the end of the year approaches. Driving much of the anxiety is a steep drop in print ad revenue, once the lifeblood for newspapers....At the same time, digital advertising and other forms of revenue have been slow to pick up the slack, leading news companies, including The New York Times, The Guardian and Gannett, the owner of USA Today, to cut costs by downsizing....Across the industry, similar declines in print advertising coupled with the shift to digital and, increasingly, mobile, are driving newspaper companies to reconfigure their newsrooms. ...The Times has also announced its intent to make subscriptions the driving source of its revenue...
newspapers  advertising  layoffs  WSJ  NYT  digital_media  cost-cutting  subscriptions  print_journalism 
october 2016 by jerryking
2 Top Technology Writers Are Leaving Dow Jones - NYTimes.com
By LESLIE KAUFMAN
Published: September 19, 2013

Fortune, which was the first to report the news, noted earlier that Ms. Swisher and Mr. Mossberg had hired the investment bank Code Advisors to find outside investors to support a move to become independent. A person with knowledge of the deal said the two had backing, but no partners had been named at this point..... Gerard Baker, editor in chief of Dow Jones and managing editor of The Wall Street Journal, said in a statement that The Journal was increasing its bet on technology coverage even without Ms. Swisher and Mr. Mossberg, its most prominent stars.

“We plan to embark on a major global expansion of our technology coverage, which will include adding 20 reviewers, bloggers, visual journalists, editors and reporters covering digital. As part of this global push, we will also be expanding our conference franchise to include an international technology conference and building a new digital home for our first-class technology news and product reviews on The Wall Street Journal Digital Network," he said.
Walter_Mossberg  WSJ  Second_Acts  digital_storage  digital_first 
september 2013 by jerryking
Chinese Hackers Target U.S. Media - WSJ.com
January 31, 2013 | WSJ | By SIOBHAN GORMAN, DEVLIN BARRETT and DANNY YADRON.
Chinese Hackers Hit U.S. Media
Wall Street Journal, New York Times Are Breached in Campaign That Stretches Back Several Years
Chinese  hackers  NYT  WSJ  FBI  cyber_security 
february 2013 by jerryking
What the Silence Said - WSJ.com
December 12, 2003 | WSJ | By DANIEL HENNINGER. A tribute to Bob Bartley.

In a December 2000 column about the Bush cabinet (titled, "Think Big"), Bob said this about the attorney-general slot: "The Occam's Razor answer is Jim Baker, just displaying legal generalship in Florida."

If you understand Occam's Razor, you understand the entire Bartley persona. I think Bob put this phrase in print about five times in his career, never of course bothering to explain its origins with the 14th-century English philosopher William of Occam, who posited the principle that the best and sturdiest solution to a problem is often the least complicated. Bob believed mightily in this idea. He thrilled, for instance, at James Carville's summation of the 1992 election: "It's the economy, stupid." Pure Occam's Razor.

Thus: To incentivize an economy you can either rejigger the entire tax code -- or reduce marginal tax rates. To keep prices stable, you can either swim through swamps of economic indicators -- or use a price rule, such as the gold standard. To find out what a nation wants, "hold an election." I think Bob saw Ronald Reagan, more than anything, as an Occam's Razor President ("Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall"). The day Bob heard that Jimmy Carter was scheduling the White House tennis court, he knew it was hopeless.

At the Journal editorial page, if you watched Bob Bartley work through the day's events -- in the news, in ideas, in life -- you learned to focus on the core of an issue, the fulcrum. The taciturnity wasn't an eccentric quirk; it was Bob's adamant, lifelong refusal to allow an issue or idea to be defeated by secondary or irrelevant detail. He defeated the irrelevancies by refusing to legitimize them with talk. Bob Bartley was in the game to move events, to move history. He knew how to do that, and in the 36 years he ran this page's editorials, he taught the rest of us how to do it: Think big. We did, and we will.
Daniel_Henninger  taciturn  tributes  wsj  Occam's_Razor  game_changers  James_A._Baker_III  thinking_big  problem_solving  incisiveness  high-impact  tax_codes 
august 2012 by jerryking
A Report to The Wall Street Journal's World-Wide Readers - WSJ.com
What Won't Change

That's what will change. Let me tell you what won't: We won't use color for color's sake, or merely to entertain you. That's not the Journal, and it never will be. Instead, we'll use color to convey more information, particularly in graphs, charts and tables, and to help you navigate your way more quickly and easily to and through those parts of the paper that matter most to you.

We won't "dumb down" The Wall Street Journal. This publication isn't for everybody, and we don't intend for it to be. Instead, it's written, edited and published for a broad community of women and men in business and seriously interested in the world of business -- and now, also, the "business of life." It's intended to be sophisticated and thoughtful and thought-provoking, and unapologetic about all of that. It's often clever, sometimes playful, but never shallow or silly. In a world sometimes overwhelmed with trivialities, our readers don't need any more trivia, and we don't intend to provide it to them.
wsj  9/11  newspapers  critical_thinking  sophisticated  worthiness  discernment  trivia 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Yoke of Bondage - WSJ.com
December 24, 2002 |

About Vermont Royster
WSJ  editorials 
august 2012 by jerryking
In Hoc Anno Domini - WSJ.com
December 24, 2011

First written in 1949 by the late Vermont Royster and has been published annually since.
editorials  wsj  Christmas 
may 2012 by jerryking
Shedding pinstripe for pastel
08 Apr 2002 | The Globe and Mail pg.13.| by William ThorsellThis week, The Wall Street Journal (which is a partner in content with The Globe and Mail) will alter its appearance and content somewhat. Its long-serving publisher, Peter Kann, assures us that "we won't dumb down The Wall Street Journal. This publication isn't for everybody, and we don't intend for it to be." Nothing about Mr. Kann or the Journal's managing editor, Paul Steiger, would create a dollop of doubt about that.
William_Thorsell  ProQuest  WSJ 
october 2011 by jerryking
Frank: The Economic Crisis: Lessons Unlearned - WSJ.com
AUGUST 11, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By THOMAS FRANK.
That Republicans have succeeded in blaming government is testimony to
their political brilliance.
Thomas_Frank  lessons_learned  liberal  commentators  dissension  WSJ 
august 2010 by jerryking
A bull in bear's clothing
May 2007 | Report on Business Magazine | by BOYD ERMAN. "He
rises every morning by 5 a.m. to plow through three newspapers—The Globe
and Mail, National Post and The Wall Street Journal, before getting
into all the research that accumulates on his desk each day. Other
people may run their funds with computer modelling and game theory;
Sprott attaches clippings to his missives for investors. "I'm always
shocked that you can read things in the newspaper that prove to be
incredibly valuable, that a lot of people miss," he says."
Eric_Sprott  profile  Bay_Street  moguls  reading  newspapers  WSJ  insights  Globe_&_Mail 
february 2010 by jerryking
Chicago Reader Blogs: The Sports Page
"The Wall Street Journal doesn't just follow sports. We lead
the way. Sure you might call our sports coverage analytical, insightful
or even forward thinking, but one thing you can't call it is
conventional. When we report on sports, we focus less on what you've
already seen happen and more on what will happen next. We look behind
the scenes. At the big picture. We tell stories you don't expect from a
perspective as unusual as it is engaging. And we show you the shape of
things to come. It's a whole new take on sports. It's sports in the Wall
Street Journal. And it's 5 days a week. Sports coverage has gone pro."
next_play  WSJ  sports  unconventional_thinking  sportscasting  forward_looking  storytelling  interpretative  aftermath  the_big_picture 
june 2009 by jerryking
An Independent Newspaper:The Bancrofts and a century of "free people and free markets."
Wednesday, June 6, 2007 |Wall Street Journal |

Editorial laying out the tradition of the WSJ's editorial page and its world view of "free people and free markets".
WSJ  free_markets  editorials 
april 2009 by jerryking
Making Old Media New Again - WSJ.com
APRIL 13, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by L. GORDON CROVITZ

See Richard Tofel, "Restless Genius: Barney Kilgore, The Wall Street
Journal and the Invention of Modern Journalism."

The Journal changed. Technology increasingly meant readers would know
the basic facts of news as it happened. Kilgore crafted the front page
"What's News -- " column to summarize what had happened, but focused on
explaining what the news meant, outline the implications for the
economy, industry and commodity and financial markets.
5_W’s  books  creative_renewal  digital_media  financial_markets  implications  journalism  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  news  newspapers  print_journalism  WSJ 
april 2009 by jerryking
Search Results for 'hyperlocal' and Wall Street Journal
Search Results for 'hyperlocal' and Wall Street Journal
hyperlocal  WSJ 
april 2009 by jerryking
NewsBios
This exclusive NewsBios directory contains the names of every
byline to appear at least 10 times in The Wall Street Journal between
October 1, 2006 and September 30, 2007.
WSJ  journalists  columnists 
march 2009 by jerryking
After 50 years, Journal enters weekend fray
Monday, September 12, 2005 G&M article by SHAWN MCCARTHY.
Adopt to understand how to offer analysis and context. "The key to
success for The Wall Street Journal or any business publication is to
provide context and analysis, to explore trends in the financial world,
and to profile decision makers,""Our whole goal is to be a lighthouse as
opposed to a street light; to show people where things are going and
not where they are."
analysis  WSJ  Trends  newspapers  HeyMath  mathematics  contextual  Waudware  thought_leadership 
february 2009 by jerryking
And the Fair Land
WSJ editorial that has appeared annually since 1961.
WSJ  Thanksgiving  History  editorials 
february 2009 by jerryking
WSJ.com: The Man Behind The Wall Street Journal
Richard Tofel's tribute to Barney Kilgore (on what would have
been his 100th birthday) and his work as journalist, editor, general
manager at the WSJ.
profile  WSJ  inspiration 
january 2009 by jerryking

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