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jerryking : young_people   33

Knowledge is the key - FT.com
December 6, 2013 12:01 am
Knowledge is the key

By Feargus O’Sullivan

"Many business plans come past my desk, often from young people with possibly good ideas but very little experience. Without base knowledge of your industry, often you’ll fail. That’s the last thing a young entrepreneur wants to hear, but I see things going wrong so often because they lack fundamental business understanding.

“If I had any advice for my younger self, I’d say read Ayn Rand. I’ve always been a libertarian, a believer in capitalism, freedom and the individual. That’s what keeps the world afloat. Rand defined seven virtues that we have running through the business, [rationality, productiveness, pride, independence, integrity, honesty and justice] ... because we thought they were good guidance for both a fulfilling life and for a successful organisation.
Ayn_Rand  knowledge  libertarians  virtues  business_planning  advice  industry_expertise  young_people 
december 2013 by jerryking
Youth potential languishing in tight job market
August 15 2012 | Share News | Pat Watson.

The good news is that human beings are, if nothing else, wired for survival. As such, the creativity that is alive and well among young people is already showing itself. Even so, government and the private sector cannot relinquish their responsibility. They must make space for co-op and professional job placements. There must also be programs that support youth entrepreneurship, both in developing entrepreneurial skills and in providing funding for business start-ups. If the structures in place will not provide enough jobs, then they must at least ensure the means to give youth a push start. They also have to make it a priority to let youth know these means are available. Better that than steady talk about building more prison facilities.
youth  unemployment  Toronto  African_Canadians  entrepreneurship  young_people 
december 2013 by jerryking
Why can’t today’s graduates get hired? -
Dec. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by Margaret Wente.

“Everywhere, employers are looking to recruit young people with a strong complement of soft skills, such as the ability to communicate, think critically and work in teams,” John Manley, president of the Canadian Council of Chief Executives, said in a recent speech.

The real skills gap, business leaders say, is not the shortage of oil-field engineers and the glut of history BAs. It’s about the shortage of young people who are good at problem-solving, communication, teamwork, time management, persistence, loyalty and dedication. Survey after survey reports that businesses can’t find enough workers who are motivated, flexible and organized. As a recent piece in Time magazine declared, “The entry-level candidates who are on tap to join the ranks of full-time work are clueless about the fundamentals of office life. ”...“As recently as 10 years ago, organizations would hire for potential,” Ms. Moses told me. “But now they want people who can hit the ground running.” Employers have also become extremely risk-averse about new hires – another factor that stacks the deck against the twentysomethings. It’s hard to prove that you can do the job if nobody will give you the first one. As for the soft-skills gap, she thinks it’s overblown. For starters, today’s young adults have collaborated and worked in teams all their lives.

The trouble is that few companies do training any more, even the kind of informal short-term training that can break in someone new.
Barbara_Moses  Communicating_&_Connecting  critical_thinking  grit  hiring  job_search  John_Manley  loyalty  millennials  Margaret_Wente  new_graduates  persistence  problem_solving  skills  short-sightedness  skills_gap  teams  time-management  young_people 
december 2013 by jerryking
Snap Out of It: Kids Aren't Reliable Tech Predictors - WSJ.com
Nov. 17, 2013 | WSJ | By Farhad Manjoo.

First, Snapchat's main selling point is ephemerality. Users who send a photo and caption using the app can select how long the image is viewable. Second, and relatedly, Snapchat is used primarily by teens and people in college. This explains much of Silicon Valley's obsession with the company....tech execs, youngsters are the canaries in the gold mine.

That logic follows a widely shared cultural belief: We all tend to assume that young people are on the technological vanguard, that they somehow have got an inside scoop on what's next. If today's kids are Snapchatting instead of Facebooking, the thinking goes, tomorrow we'll all be Snapchatting, too, because tech habits, like hairstyles, flow only one way: young to old.

There is only one problem with elevating young people's tastes this way: Kids are often wrong....Incidentally, though 20-something tech founders like Mr. Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs and Bill Gates get a lot of ink, they are unusual.... "The twentysomething inexperienced founder is an outlier, not the norm," ...If you think about it for a second, the fact that young people aren't especially reliable predictors of tech trends shouldn't come as a surprise. Sure, youth is associated with cultural flexibility, a willingness to try new things that isn't necessarily present in older folk. But there are other, less salutary hallmarks of youth, including capriciousness, immaturity, and a deference to peer pressure even at the cost of common sense. This is why high school is such fertile ground for fads. And it's why, in other cultural areas, we don't put much stock in teens' choices. No one who's older than 18, for instance, believes One Direction is the future of music....Is the app just a youthful fad, just another boy band, or is it something more permanent; is it the Beatles?

To figure this out, we would need to know why kids are using it. Are they reaching for Snapchat for reasons that would resonate with older people—because, like the rest of us, they've grown wary of the public-sharing culture promoted by Facebook and Twitter? Or are they using it for less universal reasons, because they want to evade parental snooping, send risqué photos, or avoid feeling left out of a fad everyone else has adopted?

At this point no one knows, probably not even the people who make Snapchat. For now,That's reason enough to be wary of Snapchat's youthful vigor.
capriciousness  customer_risk  developmental_change  ephemerality  fads  Farhad_Manjoo  generational_change  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  immaturity  impermanence  invisibility  motivations  peer_pressure  predictors  Silicon_Valley  Snapchat  snooping  transient  trends  young_people  youth 
november 2013 by jerryking
African-Guyanese need to invest time and resources in agriculture
May 19, 2011 | Stabroek News | by Richard Drake.

I believe that what black communities lack the most is money and wealth. A causal observation of any black community will reveal that the stranglehold of poverty is affecting their growth and development. The high number of dilapidated buildings, poor roads, water and sanitation are manifest expressions of that poverty. There are a number of reasons for this I shall discuss two.

First, our attitude towards money is bad. Look at the way we spend our hard-earned money in entertainment. Almost every show at the Providence Stadium is filled to capacity with young and not so young African-Guyanese. Every show young Blacks spend thousands of dollars they can hardly afford. We entertain ourselves at the expense of everything else, even our development.

Second, a large percentage of African-Guyanese work in the public sector; they are public servants. The government controls the public purse. Therefore, it decides how much these servants will be paid and how much they should be taxed. In this way, they do exert a great deal of power over the development of Blacks and influence the quality of their lives and communities.

One can argue that there are trade unions which negotiate with government, wages and salaries for workers. However, given the behaviour of the unions demonstrated at the last May Day rally, the divisions among them, and the fact that some of their leaders appear to have been bought out by the government one can hardly expect a decent challenge by these organizations to the unfairness in the national pay system.

As a result, the average public servant lives from pay cheque to pay cheque. It is a vicious cycle.

What is clear is that African-Guyanese desperately need a paradigm shift. African-Guyanese must get out of the public sector now. We need to begin to ‘re-image’ ourselves not as servants (public or otherwise) but as entrepreneurs. This is absolutely necessary for wealth creation and development.

One area that is immediately available to us is agriculture. There is a lot of history in the black community in this industry and much aversion to it, particularly by our young people but, there is enormous potential in this industry. Export markets are available for all kinds of non-traditional produce. However, we are too busy sitting behind desks burdened with loads of paperwork that we cannot see and exploit the potential in this sector. We love the sound of the names and status of certain positions in the public sector. Some of those very positions retard our growth and progress. We have to change that.

As a people, we need to invest time and resources in the agriculture industry; we need to go back to the land en masse. Black families and communities must become efficient economic units, generating wealth for real development through large-scale crop and animal husbandry. This will make us self employed, reduce the amount we spend in purchasing food, decrease our dependence on others to supply us with food and free up money for other investment activities. It will help in wealth generation in black communities.
Guyana  letters_to_the_editor  Afro-Guyanese  agriculture  wealth_creation  ethnic_communities  economic_development  entrepreneurship  mindsets  public_sector  overrepresentation  farming  fresh_produce  non-traditional  generational_wealth  self-employment  frugality  downward_spirals  poverty  public_servants  paradigm_shifts  African_Guyanese_villages  young_people  psyche_of_dependency 
august 2013 by jerryking
Need a Job? Invent It
March 30, 2013 | NYTimes.com | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.

Tony Wagner, the Harvard education specialist, describes his job today, he says he’s “a translator between two hostile tribes” — the education world and the business world, the people who teach our kids and the people who give them jobs. Wagner’s argument in his book “Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World” is that our K-12 and college tracks are not consistently “adding the value and teaching the skills that matter most in the marketplace.” ... I asked Wagner, what do young people need to know today?

“Every young person will continue to need basic knowledge, of course,” he said. “But they will need [transferable, hard & soft] skills and motivation even more. Of these three education goals, motivation is the most critical. Young people who are intrinsically motivated — curious, persistent, and willing to take risks — will learn new knowledge and skills continuously. They will be able to find new opportunities or create their own — a disposition that will be increasingly important as many traditional careers disappear.”...Reimagining schools for the 21st-century must be our highest priority. We need to focus more on teaching the skill and will to learn and to make a difference and bring the three most powerful ingredients of intrinsic motivation into the classroom: play, passion and purpose.” ...We need to focus more on teaching the skill and will to learn and to make a difference and bring the three most powerful ingredients of intrinsic motivation into the classroom: play, passion and purpose.”

What does that mean for teachers and principals?

“Teachers,” he said, “need to coach students to performance excellence, and principals must be instructional leaders who create the culture of collaboration required to innovate. But what gets tested is what gets taught, and so we need ‘Accountability 2.0.’ All students should have digital portfolios to show evidence of mastery of skills like critical thinking and communication, which they build up right through K-12 and postsecondary. Selective use of high-quality tests, like the College and Work Readiness Assessment, is important.
Tom_Friedman  books  students  education  life_skills  innovation  teaching  teachers  high_schools  K-12  motivations  play  purpose  transferable_skills  mindsets  intrinsically_motivated  passions  high-quality  tribes  young_people 
march 2013 by jerryking
Skills Don’t Pay the Bills - NYTimes.com
Illustration by Peter Oumanski
By ADAM DAVIDSON
Published: November 20, 2012

As the instructor Joseph Goldenberg explained, today’s skilled factory worker is really a hybrid of an old-school machinist and a computer programmer. Goldenberg’s intro class starts with the basics of how to use cutting tools to shape a raw piece of metal. Then the real work begins: students learn to write the computer code that tells a machine how to do it much faster....many believe that the manufacturing's future (and, to some extent, the future of the American economy) lies in training a new generation for highly skilled manufacturing jobs — the ones that require people who know how to run the computer that runs the machine.

This is partly because advanced manufacturing is really complicated. Running these machines requires a basic understanding of metallurgy, physics, chemistry, pneumatics, electrical wiring and computer code. It also requires a worker with the ability to figure out what’s going on when the machine isn’t working properly...yet, even as classes like Goldenberg’s are filled to capacity all over America, hundreds of thousands of U.S. factories are starving for skilled workers....The secret behind this skills gap is that it’s not a skills gap at all. I spoke to several other factory managers who also confessed that they had a hard time recruiting in-demand workers for $10-an-hour jobs....Yet according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of skilled jobs has fallen and so have their wages... “Trying to hire high-skilled workers at rock-bottom rates,” the BCG study asserted, “is not a skills gap.” The study’s conclusion, however, was scarier. Many skilled workers have simply chosen to apply their skills elsewhere rather than work for less, and few young people choose to invest in training for jobs that pay fast-food wages. As a result, the United States may soon have a hard time competing in the global economy....It’s easy to understand every perspective in this drama. Manufacturers, who face increasing competition from low-wage countries, feel they can’t afford to pay higher wages. Potential workers choose more promising career paths. “It’s individually rational,” says Howard Wial, an economist at the Brookings Institution who specializes in manufacturing employment. “But it’s not socially optimal.”...this isn’t a narrow problem facing the manufacturing industry. The so-called skills gap is really a gap in education, and that affects all of us.
skilled_trades  skills  skills_training  skills_shortage  manufacturers  BCG  education  low-wage_countries  talent_allocation  skills_gap  paradoxes  global_economy  young_people 
november 2012 by jerryking
If You’ve Got the Skills, She’s Got the Job - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: November 17, 2012

“The main reason the unemployment rate is higher today than it was in 2007, before the Great Recession, is because we have an ongoing cyclical unemployment problem — a lack of aggregate demand for labor — initiated by the financial crisis and persisting with continued housing market problems, consumers still deleveraging, the early cessation of fiscal stimulus compounded by cutbacks by state and local governments.” This is the main reason we went from around 5 percent to 8 percent unemployment.

Many community colleges and universities simply can’t keep pace and teach to the new skill requirements, especially with their budgets being cut. We need a new “Race to the Top” that will hugely incentivize businesses to embed workers in universities to teach — and universities to embed professors inside businesses to learn — so we get a much better match between schooling and the job markets.

“The world no longer cares about what you know; the world only cares about what you can do with what you know,” explains Tony Wagner of Harvard, the author of “Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World.”
Tom_Friedman  skilled_trades  books  skills_shortage  STEM  welding  deleveraging  youth  young_people  high-impact 
november 2012 by jerryking
Is the real problem here crime or systemic racism?
May 31, 2005 | G & M |Margaret Wente.

What the study did was record the age, race and gender of everybody stopped by police in the course of a year. What it found was that blacks (who make up only 1 per cent of Kingston's population) are stopped nearly three times as often, per capita, as whites. Therefore, it concluded, the police are racially biased.

But if that's true, then the police are also ageist and sexist. Only 7 per cent of the people stopped by police were 55 or older, while 35 per cent were between 15 and 24. And roughly three times more men were stopped than women. Does this mean the police are also biased against young people and men? Most crimes are committed by young men, and a disproportionate number of crimes are committed by young black men. Only 9 % of Toronto's population is black, but more than half of Toronto's 20 "most wanted" are black.
Margaret_Wente  Toronto  African_Canadians  disproportionality  statistics  Kingston  systemic_discrimination  zero-tolerance  expulsions  high_schools  criminality  Toronto_Police_Service  carding  racial_profiling  racial_disparities  young_people 
september 2012 by jerryking
Oh, those lazy young people
Aug. 24 2012 | The Globe and Mail | Todd Hirsch.

The first thing a young person should do is get an education. Not coincidentally, postsecondary education has been a huge issue burning a hole in Quebec politics this summer. But rising tuition fees or not, there is no single factor more effective in boosting creativity and productivity than an educated work force.

Travelling or living abroad is also important. The human mind needs to see different patterns and systems in order to tap its full creative potential, and seeing how people and economies work in other parts of the world is enormously helpful for this.

Finally, working in the community offers tremendous benefits. By getting involved in an arts group, a not-for-profit charity, a neighbourhood sports league – it almost doesn’t matter what as long as the interests of others are at the forefront – self-awareness and empathy are enhanced. And from this flows innovation and creativity.

Economic productivity isn’t about working longer hours, nor is it about finding a warm body to fill a dead-end job. It’s about tapping human potential. It’s about spawning new industries – ones that perhaps need some risk-taker champions along the way. And it’s about inspiring a new generation of young Canadians to say “this is our economy.”
productivity  youth  creative_renewal  travel  creativity  Millennials  Todd_Hirsch  self-awareness  empathy  innovation  education  new_businesses  perspectives  volunteering  arts  nonprofit  human_potential  young_people 
august 2012 by jerryking
Real-World Advice for the Young
04.11.05 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard.

We owe our young people ...a set of "road rules" for the real world.

Purpose. Every young person needs to know that he was created for a purpose. ...I would, however, argue that there is also an economic purpose to our lives. It is to discover our gifts, make them productive and find outlets for their best contribution.

Priorities. The best single piece of advice from Peter Drucker: Stop thinking about what you can achieve; think about what you can contribute (to your company, your customers, your marriage, your community). This is how you will achieve. Enron had an achievement-first culture; it just achieved the wrong things...how many schools teach young people to think in terms of contribution?

Preparation. Lest you think I'm urging young people down a Mother Teresa-like path of self-sacrifice, I'm not. The task is to fit purpose and contribution into a capitalistic world. There is a crying need for prepared young people who can thrive in a realm of free-market capitalism. This great system works magnificently, but it doesn't work anything like the way it's taught in most universities. In the real world, the pie of resources and wealth is not fixed; it is growing all the time. In the real world, the game is not rigged and static; rather, money and talent move at the speed of light in the direction of freedom and opportunity. In the real world, greed is bad (because it takes your eye off customers), but profits are very good. Profits allow you to invest in the future. In the real world, rising living standards do not create pollution. Instead, they create an informed middle class that wants and works to reduce pollution.

Pan-global view. The economy is global.... There is no going back.

Partner. Many of the great startups of the last 30 years began as teams of two...Behind this phenomenon is a principle: Build on your strengths. To mitigate your weaknesses--and we all have them--partner up! Find your complement.
Perseverance. Young people are smarter and more sophisticated today. It's not even close. My own generation's SAT scores look like they came out of baseball's dead-ball era. But apart from the blue-collar kids who are fighting in Iraq, most American kids today are soft. That's a harsh statement, isn't it? But cultural anecdotes back it up. Kids weigh too much. Fitness is dropping. Three American high schoolers ran the mile in under four minutes in the 1960s. It's been done by one person since. Parents sue coaches when Johnny is cut from the team. Students sue for time extensions on tests. New college dorms resemble luxury hotels. College grads, unable to face the world, move back in with their parents and stay for years.

Does this sound like a work force you'd send into combat against the Chinese?
in_the_real_world  Rich_Karlgaard  advice  Peter_Drucker  youth  students  entrepreneurship  partnerships  rules_of_the_game  purpose  globalization  Junior_Achievement  perseverance  millennials  serving_others  priorities  preparation  profits  greed  fitness  talent_flows  capital_flows  static  risk-mitigation  complacency  blue-collar  Chinese  capitalism  self-sacrifice  young_people  anecdotal 
august 2012 by jerryking
Just call Toronto Dodge City
Jul. 28 2005 | The Globe and Mail | MARGARET WENTE.

Incidents of public gang-related violence have increased and, in some neighbourhoods, gunfire has become routine. Mr. Thompson has been told that speaking out isn't good for tourism, but he does it anyway. "Innocent people are dying in our streets as a result of reckless acts of violence."

For reasons that aren't hard to guess, few people will talk bluntly about who's being shot, who's shooting them, and why. According to Mayor David Miller, the problem is lax gun laws in the United States. "The U.S. is exporting violence," he said the other day. Police watchdog John Sewell insists it's our fault, for not doing enough to make sure "kids aren't interested in guns and feel that they're part of the society."

So let's give thanks for Mr. Thompson. He's not afraid to say the problem is drugs and gangs and lax gun laws and the growth of a thug culture. Perhaps the reason he can speak so plainly is because he's black -- as are almost all of the shooters and the shot, as well as those scared little kids who've got to sleep with Mommy....Mr. Thompson was born in Jamaica and came to Canada when he was 11. He was raised by a single mother, and now has a young family of his own. "There are a lot of people who've come through adverse conditions and haven't resorted to crime and violence," he says. As for the racial issue, "I'm not going to walk on eggshells about it. It's young people from a distinct community who are uninterested in being contributing members of society. . . . The expectation is, let me get what I can as quickly as I can. The fastest way to get there is crime and drugs.

"There's a culture out there of rap music and videos and the lingo and the bling bling, the jewellery and fine cars. The friends and family are very supportive when they bring the money home and drive the fancy cars, but very unhappy when they get arrested or killed."
Toronto  Margaret_Wente  guns  violence  thug_code  Michael_Thompson  instant_gratification  young_people 
august 2012 by jerryking
We must help ourselves
December 3, 2002 | Share Newspaper | By DR. SHELDON TAYLOR.

A revitalization program may include components geared to a three-pronged approach with policy development as the essential principle. The Black business sector should receive up-front attention in the plan‘s initial phase. We should find the ways and means of attracting new approaches to entrepreneurship and sound management ideas that will allow community businesses to thrive. Only with such encouragement will more vital Black commercial community structures emerge.

It's a given that Toronto's Black community cannot be reinvigorated without money. Even if we are able to, we should resist going the government subsidy route. The person paying the piper is the one that gets to name the tune and for far too long we've had to dance to other people's music....The third aspect of the revitalization process should emphasize programs geared to the development of youths in our midst. One of the more recent difiiculties affecting growth in Toronto's Black community is that, at best, improvements don't last more than two generations. Between the end of the Second World War and the mid-1980s, advancements in concert with a larger Black population were noticeable in Toronto. Yet as the community's leadership aged, conditions waned and fewer younger candidates came forward to assume the mantle of leadership.
The interest of young people in community voluntarism must be nurtured from an early age. In conjunction with accessing educational opportunities, community service is key toward maintaining their African-Canadian identity. Young people should invest in their community. In turn, leadership succession and innovative ideas will facilitate the community's longer-term growth and development.
African_Canadians  Toronto  self-help  revitalization  Sheldon_Taylor  entrepreneurship  self-reliance  youth  leadership  volunteering  civics  community_service  young_people 
august 2012 by jerryking
Kids need jobs, not basketball
July 18, 2012 | Toronto Sun | By Megan Harris.

If political and community leaders really want to help young people in troubled neighborhoods break the cycle of high unemployment, teenage pregnancy and poverty that provide fertile breeding environments for gangs, they should stop building basketball courts and recreation centres.

Throwing taxpayer dollars at recreation centres and basketball gives these political leaders a false sense of accomplishment....What kids living in these communities need at a very early stage of their lives are opportunities to expand their horizons beyond their immediate surroundings and community.
African_Canadians  basketball  false_sense_of_accomplishment  Junior_Achievement  politicians  pregnancies  role_models  teenagers  Toronto  unemployment  young_people  youth 
july 2012 by jerryking
Economic Conditions-Economic trends-legal profession-lawyers-prestige-doctors - New York Times
January 6, 2008 | NYT | By ALEX WILLIAMS.

“The older professions are great, they’re wonderful,” said Richard Florida, the author of “The Rise of the Creative Class: And How It’s Transforming Work, Leisure, Community and Everyday Life” (Basic Books, 2003). “But they’ve lost their allure, their status. And it isn’t about money.”

OR at least, it is not all about money. The pay is still good (sometimes very good), and the in-laws aren’t exactly complaining. Still, something is missing, say many doctors, lawyers and career experts: the old sense of purpose, of respect, of living at the center of American society and embodying its definition of “success.”

In a culture that prizes risk and outsize reward — where professional heroes are college dropouts with billion-dollar Web sites — some doctors and lawyers feel they have slipped a notch in social status, drifting toward the safe-and-staid realm of dentists and accountants. It’s not just because the professions have changed, but also because the standards of what makes a prestigious career have changed.

This decline, Mr. Florida argued, is rooted in a broader shift in definitions of success, essentially, a realignment of the pillars. Especially among young people, professional status is now inextricably linked to ideas of flexibility and creativity, concepts alien to seemingly everyone but art students even a generation ago.
career_paths  Managing_Your_Career  law  law_firms  Richard_Florida  hedge_funds  private_equity  movingonup  meritocratic  professional_education  young_people 
march 2012 by jerryking
Why Are Harvard Graduates in the Mailroom?
By ADAM DAVIDSON
February 22, 2012
There are a number of professions in which workers are paid, in part, with a figurative lottery ticket. The worker accepts a lower-paying job in exchange for a slim but real chance of a large, future payday (e.g Hollywood, consulting, law,etc. )..this is termed meritocratic capitalism...an economic system that compels lots of young people to work extremely hard for little pay...as opposed to the expense (as Google pays), putting promising young applicants through a series of tests and then hiring only the small number who pass....the "occupational centrifuge" allows workers to effectively sort themselves out based on skill and drive. Over time, some will lose their commitment; others will realize that they don’t have the right talent set; others will find that they’re better at something else...When it’s time to choose who gets the top job or becomes partner, managers subsequently have a lot more information to work with....This system is unfair and arbitrary and often takes advantage of many people who don’t really have a shot at the big prize. But it is far preferable to the parts of our economy where there are no big prizes waiting....many economists fear that the comfortable Plan B jobs are disappearing....It’s not clear what today’s eager 23-year-old will do in 5 or 10 years when she decides that acting (or that accounting partnership) isn’t going to work out after all.
movingonup  career_paths  Managing_Your_Career  hard_work  Hollywood  meritocratic  sorting  Plan_B  apprenticeships  talent  skills  drive  payoffs  young_people  arbitrariness 
february 2012 by jerryking
Wise Words from a Judge in New Zealand - for Young People and Adults - Michael Sampson on Collaboration
February 13, 2012

"Northland College (NZ) principal John Tapene has offered the following words from a judge who regularly deals with youth.

"Always we hear the cry from teenagers 'What can we do, where can we go?'
... My answer is, "Go home, mow the lawn, wash the windows, learn to cook, build a raft, get a job, visit the sick, study your lessons, and after you've finished, read a book."

"Your town does not owe you recreational facilities and your parents do not owe you fun. The world does not owe you a living, you owe the world something. You owe it your time, energy and talent so that no one will be at war, in poverty or sick and lonely again."

"In other words, grow up, stop being a cry baby, get out of your dream world and develop a backbone, not a wishbone. Start behaving like a responsible person. You are important and you are needed. It's too late to sit around and wait for somebody to do something someday. Someday is now and that somebody is you...""
New_Zealand  inspiration  self-pity  tough_love  young_people 
february 2012 by jerryking
Fly Me to the Moon
December 5, 2004 | NYT | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN...."give me an America that is energy-independent and I will give you sharply reduced oil revenues for the worst governments in the world. I will give you political reform from Moscow to Riyadh to Tehran. Yes, deprive these regimes of the huge oil windfalls on which they depend and you will force them to reform by having to tap their people instead of oil wells. These regimes won't change when we tell them they should. They will change only when they tell themselves they must....If President Bush made energy independence his moon shot, he would dry up revenue for terrorism; force Iran, Russia, Venezuela and Saudi Arabia to take the path of reform - which they will never do with $45-a-barrel oil - strengthen the dollar; and improve his own standing in Europe, by doing something huge to reduce global warming. He would also create a magnet to inspire young people to contribute to the war on terrorism and America's future by becoming scientists, engineers and mathematicians. "This is not just a win-win," said the Johns Hopkins foreign policy expert Michael Mandelbaum. "This is a win-win-win-win-win."
career_paths  deprivations  energy  energy_independence  energy_security  engineering  mathematics  moonshots  NSF  oil_industry  petro-politics  SAIS  STEM  Tom_Friedman  win-win  youth  young_people 
january 2012 by jerryking
'Oops. I Told the Truth.'
October 17, 2004 | NYT | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.

The next U.S. president has three baby booms bearing down at us, and without a massive injection of truth-telling they could all explode on the next president's watch.
(1)American baby boom generation is now just two presidential terms away from claiming its Social Security and Medicare benefits.
(2) the young people in India, China and Eastern Europe, who in this increasingly flat world will be able to compete with your kids and mine more directly than ever for high-value-added jobs.
(3) the Arab world. The Arab region has had the highest rate of population growth in the world in the last half century. It has among the highest unemployment rates in the world today. And one-third of the Arab population is under the age of 15 and will soon be entering both a barren job market and its child-bearing years.
flat_world  Tom_Friedman  truth-telling  Bill_Cosby  Arab-Muslim_world  high-wage  baby_boomers  India  China  Eastern_Europe  young_people 
january 2012 by jerryking
THE HIP HOP GENERATION
Rev. Al Sharpton Friday, December 27, 2002

These rappers and "hip-hop impresarios" weren't worried about unemployment or the financial conditions of those who support their records and made them stars. They weren't worried about the education system that keeps too many of their fans and families in poverty. They weren't worried about voting rights. They didn't have any conferences on any of that. There wasn't one seminar entitled "Economic Empowerment" or "Jobs for the 21st Century."...Unfortunately, much of what they're selling is a fraud. They spew hedonism, misogyny, and self-hate. They glorify the prison culture, the pimp culture, and drug culture. They tell the young that they're not worthy unless they're "rocking" Chanel, Gucci, or wearing platinum and diamonds. Not only is this message immoral, but it is also flawed. It's a lie.

The most ludicrous thing in the world is to see a former rapper walking around Broadway with gold teeth and a tarnished ring, his career is gone and he has nothing else. That's how most of these stories end, but nobody is rapping or singing about that.

These artists get huge advances from the record labels, and the first thing they do is run out and buy a big, fancy car. They buy, buy, buy what they wanty, and beg for what they need, and end up with nothing. I think that projecting these images to young people - the bling-bling and the showpieces - and not talking about real estate and land and the fundamental things in life, is almost criminal. These so-called artists are leading our youth down a road that will ultimately lead to their destruction.
Al_Sharpton  hip_hop  rappers  African-Americans  profanity  misogyny  conspicuous_consumption  hedonism  thug_code  personal_finance  young_people 
november 2011 by jerryking
African Leadership Academy - ALA Founder Fred Swaniker Speaks at TED Global Conference in Tanzania
to sustain and accelerate Africa’s development, however, we must be more systematic about cultivating these leaders. We must be proactive about increasing the number of individuals who can conceive of important new ideas and implement them.

And so was born the idea for African Leadership Academy. Our goal is to identify young people throughout the continent—125 each and every year—that we believe have the potential to develop and implement important new ideas that can transform Africa. We will bring these young people to the Academy for 2 years in a full-time residential program, as a sort of “Rhodes Scholarship” for Africa’s most promising young leaders. This will begin a life-long process of nurturing these amazing people to bring about the change that our beautiful continent so desperately needs.
leaders  Africa  African  leadership_development  ideas  systematic_approaches  transformational  young_people 
september 2011 by jerryking
From a Crisis, Opportunity
April 24, 2011 New York Times PATRICIA R.
OLSEN.Municipalities are struggling today as they deal with fiscal crises. But they're engaging in layoffs and cutting services in an attempt to balance their budgets. I believe that reports of possible enormous defaults are overstated. The municipal sector has been known for its safe investments. Lower-rated credit, in the nonrated or junk-bond range, and credit barely investment grade, are vulnerable; that's why these investments pay a higher yield.

In 2000, when working in Detroit for our company, I was co-founder of an internship program, the Detroit Summer Finance Institute, which exposes inner-city students to finance jobs. People often view the municipal
finance sector as less glamorous than the corporate one. Young people,
especially, don't always realize how rewarding work in this field can
be. We have offices in 22 cities. I see the impact of our work in many
cities -- from convention centers to highways to educational projects.
municipalities  municipal_finance  African-Americans  women  Octothorpe_Software  unglamorous  internships  young_people 
april 2011 by jerryking
China, Twitter and 20-Year-Olds vs. the Pyramids - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
February 5, 2011
The forces that were upholding the status quo in the Arab world for so
long — oil, autocracy, the distraction of Israel, and a fear of the
chaos that could come with change — have finally met an engine of change
that is even more powerful: China, Twitter and 20-year-olds. ...Egypt’s
government has wasted the last 30 years — i.e., their whole lives —
plying them with the soft bigotry of low expectations: “Be patient.
Egypt moves at its own pace, like the Nile.” Well, great. Singapore also
moves at its own pace, like the Internet. ....The Arab world has 100
million young people today between the ages of 15 and 29, many of them
males who do not have the education to get a good job, buy an apartment
and get married. That is trouble. Add in rising food prices, and the
diffusion of Twitter, Facebook and texting, which finally gives them a
voice to talk back to their leaders and directly to each other, and you
have a very powerful change engine.
Singapore  China  Middle_East  Arab-Muslim_world  Egypt  Tom_Friedman  competitiveness_of_nations  Arab_Spring  sclerotic  young_people 
february 2011 by jerryking
The Youth Unemployment Bomb - BusinessWeek
February 2, 2011, 11:40PM EST text size: TT
The Youth Unemployment Bomb
From Cairo to London to Brooklyn, too many young people are jobless and
disaffected. Inside the global effort to put the next generation to work

By Peter Coy
unemployment  youth  globalization  disaffection  young_people 
february 2011 by jerryking
Dean of Ivey's Hong Kong campus: 'Canadians are missing the boat' - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 01, 2010 | Globe & Mail | GORDON PITTS. We’re not
preparing the next generation for a time when China will be a
superpower. What are we doing to teach people about China? We still have
people calling us and saying ‘I’m going to China – what should I wear?’
In reality, Hong Kong is a sophisticated city. And when you land in
Beijing, you’re in an enormous city where people are master consumers.
And we are focusing all our attention on languages that might not be as
useful as Mandarin in the future.

It’s really about fixing young people’s attention on the fact the
economic powerhouse is not the U.S. any more. It is China and it is
India and we don’t know enough about this side of the world.
Hong_Kong  China  Ivey  Gordon_Pitts  China_rising  America_in_Decline?  superpowers  Mandarin  languages  young_people 
november 2010 by jerryking
New Programs Aim to Lure Young Into Digital Jobs
December 20, 2009 |New York Times | STEVE LOHR.Hybrid careers
like Dr. Halamka’s that combine computing with other fields will
increasingly be the new American jobs of the future, labor experts say.
In other words, the nation’s economy is going to need more cool nerds.
But not enough young people are embracing computing — often because they
are leery of being branded nerds.
Steve_Lohr  Colleges_&_Universities  students  career_paths  STEM  new_graduates  nerds  young_people 
december 2009 by jerryking
'Tis Not Simple to Give Gifts - WSJ.com
JULY 13, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by CHRISTIAN C. SAHNER.
Details the various efforts underway to teach young people about
charitable giving. Classes at more than 125 universities expose
students to the nonprofit world, mostly through managerial training,
accounting and study of nonprofit policy. Classes at a smaller number of
institutions try to examine philanthropy using a wider lens.
philanthropy  youth  charities  young_people 
may 2009 by jerryking
Word to the young: History may be your greatest guide
Toronto, Ont.: Aug 5, 2006.| The Globe and Mail. pg. B.10| Ira
Gluskin.

The purpose of this reading is twofold. The first is to satisfy
curiosity about the world that we live in. The second purpose is to be
well informed should that be helpful to the investment process. How much
financial history young people are supposed to know? Historical
knowledge and communications skills may become more valuable one day.
reading  financial_history  Ira_Gluskin  high_net_worth  books  Gluskin_Sheff  money_management  wealth_management  Toronto  Bay_Street  history  curiosity  young_people 
march 2009 by jerryking
What Life Asks of Us - Op-Ed - NYTimes.com
January 26, 2009 NYT op-ed by David Brooks argues that there
are at least two schools of thought regarding the purpose of an
education. Individualists who espouse unsettling presumptions,
defamiliarizing oneself of the familiar, revealing what is going on
beneath and behind appearances, and disorienting young people to help
them to find ways to reorient themselves.

The members of the other school are institutionalists who are defined
by what life asks of us. As we go through life, we travel through
institutions — first family and school, then the institutions of a
profession or a craft. Each of these institutions comes with certain
rules and obligations that tell us how to do what we’re supposed to do.
David_Brooks  education  purpose  liberal_arts  institutions  disorientation  individual_initiative  inner_workings  young_people  presumptions 
january 2009 by jerryking

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