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jerryking : youth   54

Opinion | The World According to Mad Magazine
July 12, 2019 | The New York Times | By Tim Kreider. Mr. Kreider is an essayist and cartoonist.

The announcement last week that Mad would cease monthly publication of new material made me sad in the far-off way you feel when you hear that a celebrity you didn’t know was still alive has died. I was a regular reader of Mad in the 1970s, when the magazine was at the height of its popularity and influence. I learned many things from Mad: who Spiro Agnew was, the plots of R-rated movies like “Coma” and show tunes like “I Got Plenty o’ Nuttin’,’” which the writers of Mad evidently assumed would be familiar enough to 10-year-olds of the ’70s to parody — “I Got Plenty of Muslims,” sung by a black militant. I also learned about black militants.

I also learned from Mad that politicians were corrupt and deceitful, that Hollywood and Madison Avenue pushed insulting junk, that religion was more invested in respectability than compassion, that school was mostly about teaching you to obey arbitrary rules and submit to dingbats and martinets — that it was, in short, all BS. Grown-ups who worried that Mad was a subversive influence, undermining the youth of America’s respect for their elders and faith in our hallowed institutions, were 100 percent correct..........By the time most of us hit adolescence and learn that the world is unfair, exploitative and brutal, and that most people in it live in shocking poverty and squalor, and that we’re all somehow implicated in this even though it wasn’t our idea, plus there’s no God and we’re all going to die and the grown-ups have been secretly having sex the whole time, you feel ripped off. You feel lied to.

So you turn to art that rips the facades off everything, exposing adults and their institutions as swinish and rotten. Humor is adolescents’ reflexive defense against all the unpleasantness they’re confronting for the first time. It’s a distinctively adolescent form of humor we now call “snark” — irony, sarcasm, satire and parody — whose agenda is to mock and tear down and caper gleefully upon the grave of everything sacred and respectable.

It’s no coincidence that Mad reached its highest circulation in the era of the Vietnam War, Watergate and the “credibility gap” — the collapse of public faith in the integrity and honesty of our government. It was a healthy antidote to earlier generations’ automatic deference to an authority that too seldom deserved it........Adolescents are also scarily passionate absolutists, and there is, behind all parody and satire, a moral agenda; people like Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert aren’t America haters but closet patriots and true believers. Mad’s ethos was essentially conservative: its all-fronts, iconoclastic assault on bigotry and hypocrisy was a tacit appeal to good old-fashioned decency and integrity. Mad made good enemies: The Ku Klux Klan once demanded an apology and threatened to sue over what it considered a libel against its organization.......Mad’s influence is ubiquitous now. The glut of satire and subversive comedy we all now consume daily is created by kids who grew up on Mad or on humor inspired by it: “Saturday Night Live,” “The Simpsons,” “The Daily Show,” “The Colbert Report” and The Onion are all in one way or another the spawn of Mad. . But in the end, the magazine largely obviated itself as a cultural force by becoming the dominant mode of humor in America.
'70s  anti-Establishment  cartoons  comic-books  farewells  golden_age  humour  magazines  op-ed  parodies  satire  subversion  youth 
july 2019 by jerryking
Cause or effect? The link between gentrification and violent crime
July 12, 2018 | | Financial Times | by Nathan Brooker YESTERDAY.

London, which is experiencing a sustained increase in violent offences as crime rates in other global cities such as New York, Sydney and Hong Kong continue to fall......The escalation of violence has been linked to provocation on social media, increased competition in the drugs trade, a reduction in police measures such as stop and search and an overall drop in police funding— the Met has seen its annual budget cut by about 20 per cent since 2010-11, and it has lost 10 per cent of its police officers in that time......However, one factor that is often overlooked and, according to professional and academic observers, has played a key role in exacerbating London’s recent crime wave, is its gentrifying property market.

Areas of London that have higher levels of deprivation also tend to have higher crime rates.........The level of violence you see is getting much more extreme......Gentrification has had a significant impact on the area....“One of the issues young people have in Hackney Wick is the lack of aspiration, the lack of hope,” says Allen. “They’re all living in a rich, diverse city, but it still feels very separate to them. It’s not their development; it’s somebody else’s. They think they won’t be able to live in the area they were brought up in because they’re not going to be able to spend £600,000 on an apartment.”.........gentrification has not only affected gang recruitment..... it has fundamentally altered how some gangs operate.........“It changed their idea of territory, since some senior members were forced out of the area [by the redevelopment] and had to commute in, for want of a better term,” he says. “Ten years ago there was a very strong connection to territory. There was an emotional connection. But the redevelopment changed that. The only territory that was left was the market place — the drugs market place — and that needs to be protected.”

It’s the protection of that market — one both lucrative and highly nebulous — that is behind some of the increase in violent crime. Without the clear boundaries an estate or a postcode might provide, he says, and with the high value of the drugs trade upping the stakes, transgressions are met with more intense violence.....The reasons behind the dramatic decline in New York’s murder count are much argued over: the growing economy, the end of the crack epidemic have all been put up as possible causes. Yet improvements to policing brought in under former New York police commissioner Bill Bratton cannot be overlooked.

Bratton’s policies, which included clampdowns on various low-level offences, and an increase in stop-question-and-frisk, are often mischaracterised as a zero-tolerance approach to policing, he says.

“What he really did was a management innovation.” Bratton, who was in the office 1994-96 and returned in 2014-16, introduced CompStat, measures that used computer programs to map where and when crimes were taking place, and how police resources were being shared. “When [Bratton] took over, the largest number of cops were on the day shift, but the largest number of crimes took place on the evening shift and the night shift,” he says. Bratton reallocated officers accordingly. They had a slogan: “Put cops on the dots”.......the most important thing Bratton did, Kleiman says, was make management more accountable, hauling in three precinct captains each week to grill them on their CompStat data. During his first year as commissioner, Bratton replaced something like two-thirds of the city’s 76 precinct commanders......The problem with fear is that it’s an unhelpful response. Fear raises money for private security firms, not community programmes; it improves funding to free schools, not failing academies; it promotes only the most brutal, careless forms of policing. In communities that are undergoing gentrification, fear further divides the haves and the have-nots: decreasing the kinds of relationships that might aid social mobility and better connect disadvantaged youth with the city they live in.

And what gets forgotten, says Allen, is that fear goes both ways. “A lot of the young people that get caught up in youth violence are caught up because they’re vulnerable and they’re frightened,”
accountability  Bill_Bratton  budget_cuts  carding  causality  CompStat  criminality  criminal_justice_system  data  deprivations  disaffection  fear  gentrification  homicides  killings  London  New_York_City  NYPD  organized_crime  policing  property_markets  redevelopments  United_Kingdom  violent_crime  youth 
july 2018 by jerryking
Twitter’s Troubles and Snap’s Appeal: It’s All About the Mojo
OCT. 11, 2016 | - The New York Times| By STEVEN DAVIDOFF SOLOMON.

User growth is the secret sauce of internet valuations. Revenue and earnings are forgiven if you can show growth in users. Whether that makes sense, of course, is another matter.....Sharp leadership — whether that is from its chief executive, Jack Dorsey, or new blood — could certainly help Twitter exploit its huge user base.

But the problem is that in the eyes of the Valley, Twitter has lost its mojo.

Even as Twitter was deflating, another social media darling, Snapchat, now renamed Snap, was riding high as reports emerged that the start-up, known for its disappearing messages, was preparing for a public offering that could value it for as much as $25 billion.
Twitter  Snapchat  momentum  valuations  Silicon_Valley  social_media  youth  mojo  special_sauce  customer_growth  user_growth  user_bases 
october 2016 by jerryking
Three generations of de Gaspé Beaubien family give back to Canada - The Globe and Mail
ROY MACGREGOR
GATINEAU, QUE. — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 05, 2015

Working with Ottawa Riverkeeper’s capable executive director, Meredith Brown, the partnership last weekend hosted a summit, AquaHacking 2015, in a hotel just across the river from Parliament Hill. With the help of co-sponsor IBM, they held a “hackathon” and gave out $20,000 in prizes to computer wizards who came up with the best applications to help gather data on the health of the river. Some came from as far away as California to compete.
philanthropy  family  family-owned_businesses  water  family_business  public_service  Quebec  civics  youth  leadership  giving  serving_others 
june 2015 by jerryking
Black, White and Baseball - NYTimes.com
AUG. 23, 2014 | NYT | Frank Bruni.

here, at the Little League World Series, that Mo’ne Davis captured the country’s hearts. A 13-year-old wunderkind from Philadelphia, she was believed to be the first black girl to play in the series. She was definitely the first girl ever to pitch a shutout. She landed on the cover of Sports Illustrated, exploded stereotypes about women and sports and did it with a poise and grace that most people twice or even four times her age struggle to muster.
race_relations  baseball  philanthropy  Philadelphia  girls  Jackie_Robinson  African-Americans  wunderkind  youth 
august 2014 by jerryking
Obama on 'Acting White' - WSJ
"Sometimes African Americans, in communities where I've worked, there's been the notion of 'acting white'—which sometimes is overstated, but there's an element of truth to it, where, okay, if boys are reading too much, then, well, why are you doing that? Or why are you speaking so properly? And the notion that there's some authentic way of being black, that if you're going to be black you have to act a certain way and wear a certain kind of clothes, that has to go. Because there are a whole bunch of different ways for African American men to be authentic."
Obama  authenticity  African-Americans  youth 
august 2014 by jerryking
The importance of being courteous: Why she is touting it to young women
Jul. 17 2014 | The Globe and Mail | LEAH MCLAREN.

Institutional achievement and politeness should not be mutually exclusive, but both are essential for young people to find fulfilling work and relationships later in life. ...Raising well-behaved children well should be a significant civic duty.

Manners, which an increasing number of parents dismiss as old-fashioned, actually matter more than ever before. As Reardon pointed out in her speech, this is not about “using the right spoon for soup or eating asparagus with your left hand” but the importance of “being polite and respectful and making the people you interact with feel valued.”

Such deep internal values must be impressed upon children from the outside in. When it comes to character we must fake it in childhood to make it as adults. Am I implying that teaching a child to simply say, “Excuse me,” before interrupting can lead to a successful career and a happy marriage later in life? Yes, absolutely.

In the digital era, when kids are communicating through a coded vortex of social media and smartphone screens rather than face to face, it’s especially important for parents to invest time and energy to impart social rules for how to communicate properly with other humans in the flesh....The thing about manners is that they are actually much more time-consuming to instill in your children than, say, teaching them to play the cello or speak fluent Mandarin. That’s because most parents will naturally outsource the latter two skills (unless they happen to be Chinese cellists) whereas good manners require tireless, everyday, hands-on effort. Take “please” and “thank you” – by far the most superficial of all our accepted behavioural etiquette constructs. To teach a child to say these things consistently and without prompting, the average parent must correct that child several dozen times a day from the time they are initially verbal until about 5 or 6. On average, that’s more than 100,000 verbal cues until a child actually gets it. Your pet goldfish learns tricks faster than that. And that’s not even counting the thousands of mandatory apologies, forced thank-you-notes and supervised household chores. Raising a well-mannered kid is a slog, and no babysitter, tutor or fancy private school is going to do it for you
parenting  etiquette  civics  commencement  high_schools  Leah_McLaren  courtesies  civility  students  women  girls  youth  verbal_cues 
july 2014 by jerryking
Youth potential languishing in tight job market
August 15 2012 | Share News | Pat Watson.

The good news is that human beings are, if nothing else, wired for survival. As such, the creativity that is alive and well among young people is already showing itself. Even so, government and the private sector cannot relinquish their responsibility. They must make space for co-op and professional job placements. There must also be programs that support youth entrepreneurship, both in developing entrepreneurial skills and in providing funding for business start-ups. If the structures in place will not provide enough jobs, then they must at least ensure the means to give youth a push start. They also have to make it a priority to let youth know these means are available. Better that than steady talk about building more prison facilities.
youth  unemployment  Toronto  African_Canadians  entrepreneurship  young_people 
december 2013 by jerryking
Snap Out of It: Kids Aren't Reliable Tech Predictors - WSJ.com
Nov. 17, 2013 | WSJ | By Farhad Manjoo.

First, Snapchat's main selling point is ephemerality. Users who send a photo and caption using the app can select how long the image is viewable. Second, and relatedly, Snapchat is used primarily by teens and people in college. This explains much of Silicon Valley's obsession with the company....tech execs, youngsters are the canaries in the gold mine.

That logic follows a widely shared cultural belief: We all tend to assume that young people are on the technological vanguard, that they somehow have got an inside scoop on what's next. If today's kids are Snapchatting instead of Facebooking, the thinking goes, tomorrow we'll all be Snapchatting, too, because tech habits, like hairstyles, flow only one way: young to old.

There is only one problem with elevating young people's tastes this way: Kids are often wrong....Incidentally, though 20-something tech founders like Mr. Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs and Bill Gates get a lot of ink, they are unusual.... "The twentysomething inexperienced founder is an outlier, not the norm," ...If you think about it for a second, the fact that young people aren't especially reliable predictors of tech trends shouldn't come as a surprise. Sure, youth is associated with cultural flexibility, a willingness to try new things that isn't necessarily present in older folk. But there are other, less salutary hallmarks of youth, including capriciousness, immaturity, and a deference to peer pressure even at the cost of common sense. This is why high school is such fertile ground for fads. And it's why, in other cultural areas, we don't put much stock in teens' choices. No one who's older than 18, for instance, believes One Direction is the future of music....Is the app just a youthful fad, just another boy band, or is it something more permanent; is it the Beatles?

To figure this out, we would need to know why kids are using it. Are they reaching for Snapchat for reasons that would resonate with older people—because, like the rest of us, they've grown wary of the public-sharing culture promoted by Facebook and Twitter? Or are they using it for less universal reasons, because they want to evade parental snooping, send risqué photos, or avoid feeling left out of a fad everyone else has adopted?

At this point no one knows, probably not even the people who make Snapchat. For now,That's reason enough to be wary of Snapchat's youthful vigor.
capriciousness  customer_risk  developmental_change  ephemerality  fads  Farhad_Manjoo  generational_change  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  immaturity  impermanence  invisibility  motivations  peer_pressure  predictors  Silicon_Valley  Snapchat  snooping  transient  trends  young_people  youth 
november 2013 by jerryking
If You’ve Got the Skills, She’s Got the Job - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: November 17, 2012

“The main reason the unemployment rate is higher today than it was in 2007, before the Great Recession, is because we have an ongoing cyclical unemployment problem — a lack of aggregate demand for labor — initiated by the financial crisis and persisting with continued housing market problems, consumers still deleveraging, the early cessation of fiscal stimulus compounded by cutbacks by state and local governments.” This is the main reason we went from around 5 percent to 8 percent unemployment.

Many community colleges and universities simply can’t keep pace and teach to the new skill requirements, especially with their budgets being cut. We need a new “Race to the Top” that will hugely incentivize businesses to embed workers in universities to teach — and universities to embed professors inside businesses to learn — so we get a much better match between schooling and the job markets.

“The world no longer cares about what you know; the world only cares about what you can do with what you know,” explains Tony Wagner of Harvard, the author of “Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World.”
Tom_Friedman  skilled_trades  books  skills_shortage  STEM  welding  deleveraging  youth  young_people  high-impact 
november 2012 by jerryking
What's All the Fuss About Being Canadian?
August 25th, 2003 | TIME Magazine | Stephen Handelman. The message from non-Canadians at Couchiching was clear: Rise above parochial concerns and help change North America, if you really want to change the world.

Canadian? Sure but not confined by it.
Canadian  national_identity  youth  millennials  sovereignty 
september 2012 by jerryking
Oh, those lazy young people
Aug. 24 2012 | The Globe and Mail | Todd Hirsch.

The first thing a young person should do is get an education. Not coincidentally, postsecondary education has been a huge issue burning a hole in Quebec politics this summer. But rising tuition fees or not, there is no single factor more effective in boosting creativity and productivity than an educated work force.

Travelling or living abroad is also important. The human mind needs to see different patterns and systems in order to tap its full creative potential, and seeing how people and economies work in other parts of the world is enormously helpful for this.

Finally, working in the community offers tremendous benefits. By getting involved in an arts group, a not-for-profit charity, a neighbourhood sports league – it almost doesn’t matter what as long as the interests of others are at the forefront – self-awareness and empathy are enhanced. And from this flows innovation and creativity.

Economic productivity isn’t about working longer hours, nor is it about finding a warm body to fill a dead-end job. It’s about tapping human potential. It’s about spawning new industries – ones that perhaps need some risk-taker champions along the way. And it’s about inspiring a new generation of young Canadians to say “this is our economy.”
productivity  youth  creative_renewal  travel  creativity  Millennials  Todd_Hirsch  self-awareness  empathy  innovation  education  new_businesses  perspectives  volunteering  arts  nonprofit  human_potential  young_people 
august 2012 by jerryking
The kids are all right |
October 27, 2003 | PROFITguide.com | Rick Spence || .
Rick_Spence  entrepreneurship  training  youth  children 
august 2012 by jerryking
A Crash Course On Staying Wealthy - WSJ.com
March 23, 2005 | WSJ | By ROBERT FRANK
A Crash Course On Staying Wealthy
Financial Training Programs For Kids Are Proliferating; Cultivating Future Clients
children  youth  financial_literacy  wealth_management  training  Robert_Frank  high_net_worth  training_programs 
august 2012 by jerryking
'Boot Camp' Offers the Young Rich Lessons in Handling Their Wealth - WSJ.com
December 27, 2006 | WSJ | By SCOTT STEARNS .
'Boot Camp' Offers the Young Rich Lessons in Handling Their Wealth
parenting  high_net_worth  affluence  wealth_management  training  youth  personal_finance  financial_literacy 
august 2012 by jerryking
Real-World Advice for the Young
04.11.05 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard.

We owe our young people ...a set of "road rules" for the real world.

Purpose. Every young person needs to know that he was created for a purpose. ...I would, however, argue that there is also an economic purpose to our lives. It is to discover our gifts, make them productive and find outlets for their best contribution.

Priorities. The best single piece of advice from Peter Drucker: Stop thinking about what you can achieve; think about what you can contribute (to your company, your customers, your marriage, your community). This is how you will achieve. Enron had an achievement-first culture; it just achieved the wrong things...how many schools teach young people to think in terms of contribution?

Preparation. Lest you think I'm urging young people down a Mother Teresa-like path of self-sacrifice, I'm not. The task is to fit purpose and contribution into a capitalistic world. There is a crying need for prepared young people who can thrive in a realm of free-market capitalism. This great system works magnificently, but it doesn't work anything like the way it's taught in most universities. In the real world, the pie of resources and wealth is not fixed; it is growing all the time. In the real world, the game is not rigged and static; rather, money and talent move at the speed of light in the direction of freedom and opportunity. In the real world, greed is bad (because it takes your eye off customers), but profits are very good. Profits allow you to invest in the future. In the real world, rising living standards do not create pollution. Instead, they create an informed middle class that wants and works to reduce pollution.

Pan-global view. The economy is global.... There is no going back.

Partner. Many of the great startups of the last 30 years began as teams of two...Behind this phenomenon is a principle: Build on your strengths. To mitigate your weaknesses--and we all have them--partner up! Find your complement.
Perseverance. Young people are smarter and more sophisticated today. It's not even close. My own generation's SAT scores look like they came out of baseball's dead-ball era. But apart from the blue-collar kids who are fighting in Iraq, most American kids today are soft. That's a harsh statement, isn't it? But cultural anecdotes back it up. Kids weigh too much. Fitness is dropping. Three American high schoolers ran the mile in under four minutes in the 1960s. It's been done by one person since. Parents sue coaches when Johnny is cut from the team. Students sue for time extensions on tests. New college dorms resemble luxury hotels. College grads, unable to face the world, move back in with their parents and stay for years.

Does this sound like a work force you'd send into combat against the Chinese?
in_the_real_world  Rich_Karlgaard  advice  Peter_Drucker  youth  students  entrepreneurship  partnerships  rules_of_the_game  purpose  globalization  Junior_Achievement  perseverance  millennials  serving_others  priorities  preparation  profits  greed  fitness  talent_flows  capital_flows  static  risk-mitigation  complacency  blue-collar  Chinese  capitalism  self-sacrifice  young_people  anecdotal 
august 2012 by jerryking
Race is the elephant in the room
Nov. 22 2005 | G&M | MARGARET WENTE

Toronto schools are also taking it in the neck for racial profiling. That's because young black males make up a disproportionate number of the students who are penalized for discipline and behaviour problems. Anyone with the slightest experience in Toronto's schools knows these problems are real. But saying so is not an option. Instead, the school board has promised the Ontario Human Rights Commission that the schools will be more sensitive. From now on, principals must consider "mitigating factors" before they impose discipline. One such factor is "racial harassment." Next fall, schools will begin to gather race-based discipline statistics in order to detect bias. Want to guess what's going to happen?
race  Toronto  Margaret_Wente  killings  African_Canadians  schools  students  youth  disproportionality 
august 2012 by jerryking
We must help ourselves
December 3, 2002 | Share Newspaper | By DR. SHELDON TAYLOR.

A revitalization program may include components geared to a three-pronged approach with policy development as the essential principle. The Black business sector should receive up-front attention in the plan‘s initial phase. We should find the ways and means of attracting new approaches to entrepreneurship and sound management ideas that will allow community businesses to thrive. Only with such encouragement will more vital Black commercial community structures emerge.

It's a given that Toronto's Black community cannot be reinvigorated without money. Even if we are able to, we should resist going the government subsidy route. The person paying the piper is the one that gets to name the tune and for far too long we've had to dance to other people's music....The third aspect of the revitalization process should emphasize programs geared to the development of youths in our midst. One of the more recent difiiculties affecting growth in Toronto's Black community is that, at best, improvements don't last more than two generations. Between the end of the Second World War and the mid-1980s, advancements in concert with a larger Black population were noticeable in Toronto. Yet as the community's leadership aged, conditions waned and fewer younger candidates came forward to assume the mantle of leadership.
The interest of young people in community voluntarism must be nurtured from an early age. In conjunction with accessing educational opportunities, community service is key toward maintaining their African-Canadian identity. Young people should invest in their community. In turn, leadership succession and innovative ideas will facilitate the community's longer-term growth and development.
African_Canadians  Toronto  self-help  revitalization  Sheldon_Taylor  entrepreneurship  self-reliance  youth  leadership  volunteering  civics  community_service  young_people 
august 2012 by jerryking
Kids need jobs, not basketball
July 18, 2012 | Toronto Sun | By Megan Harris.

If political and community leaders really want to help young people in troubled neighborhoods break the cycle of high unemployment, teenage pregnancy and poverty that provide fertile breeding environments for gangs, they should stop building basketball courts and recreation centres.

Throwing taxpayer dollars at recreation centres and basketball gives these political leaders a false sense of accomplishment....What kids living in these communities need at a very early stage of their lives are opportunities to expand their horizons beyond their immediate surroundings and community.
African_Canadians  basketball  false_sense_of_accomplishment  Junior_Achievement  politicians  pregnancies  role_models  teenagers  Toronto  unemployment  young_people  youth 
july 2012 by jerryking
Fly Me to the Moon
December 5, 2004 | NYT | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN...."give me an America that is energy-independent and I will give you sharply reduced oil revenues for the worst governments in the world. I will give you political reform from Moscow to Riyadh to Tehran. Yes, deprive these regimes of the huge oil windfalls on which they depend and you will force them to reform by having to tap their people instead of oil wells. These regimes won't change when we tell them they should. They will change only when they tell themselves they must....If President Bush made energy independence his moon shot, he would dry up revenue for terrorism; force Iran, Russia, Venezuela and Saudi Arabia to take the path of reform - which they will never do with $45-a-barrel oil - strengthen the dollar; and improve his own standing in Europe, by doing something huge to reduce global warming. He would also create a magnet to inspire young people to contribute to the war on terrorism and America's future by becoming scientists, engineers and mathematicians. "This is not just a win-win," said the Johns Hopkins foreign policy expert Michael Mandelbaum. "This is a win-win-win-win-win."
career_paths  deprivations  energy  energy_independence  energy_security  engineering  mathematics  moonshots  NSF  oil_industry  petro-politics  SAIS  STEM  Tom_Friedman  win-win  youth  young_people 
january 2012 by jerryking
Save Jamaica's sons
Nov 18, 2002 | The Globe and Mail pg. A.19 | Trudy Simpson.
ProQuest  Jamaica  killings  violence  youth  Toronto 
november 2011 by jerryking
Get mad, we're bein' had, gangsta rap's really bad
Margaret Wente. The Globe and Mail. Toronto, Ont.: Dec 1, 2005. pg. A.31Among the fiercest critics of hip-hop culture is John McWhorter, a black American academic. Two years ago, he wrote a blistering essay called "How hip hop holds blacks back," in which he traced the decline of rap from happy party music to the ugly glorification of thug life, bling, easy money, fast cars and woman-bashing. "Of course, not all hip hop is belligerent or profane," he wrote. "But it's the nastiest rap that sells best, and the nastiest cuts that make a career." Today, hip hop is a billion-dollar industry, and stars such as 50 Cent and Cam'ron Giles are extremely rich.

Mr. McWhorter argues that the attitude and style expressed in the hip-hop "identity" keep blacks down. "Almost all hip hop, gangsta or not, is delivered with a cocky, confrontational cadence that is fast becoming a common speech style among young black males. . . . The problem with such speech and mannerisms is that they make potential employers wary of young black men and can impede a young black's ability to interact comfortably with co-workers and customers. The black community has gone through too much to sacrifice upward mobility to the passing kick of an adversarial hip-hop 'identity.' "
Margaret_Wente  ProQuest  music  hip_hop  decline  John_McWhorter  thug_code  misogyny  sexism  youth 
november 2011 by jerryking
More than ‘cows and cooking,’ 4-H movement reinvents itself
Sept. 21, 2011 | Globe & Mail | PAUL WALDIE. Ideas for the UFSC and Junior Achievement
youth  Paul_Waldie  Junior_Achievement  agriculture  reinvention  farming 
september 2011 by jerryking
Youth unemployment the kindling that fuels unrest - The Globe and Mail
GWYN MORGAN | Columnist profile
From Monday's Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Sep. 11, 2011
The most dangerous threat/force in the world is the large number of unemployed youth throughout the world.
youth  unemployment  Gwyn_Morgan  uprisings 
september 2011 by jerryking
The Youth Unemployment Bomb - BusinessWeek
February 2, 2011, 11:40PM EST text size: TT
The Youth Unemployment Bomb
From Cairo to London to Brooklyn, too many young people are jobless and
disaffected. Inside the global effort to put the next generation to work

By Peter Coy
unemployment  youth  globalization  disaffection  young_people 
february 2011 by jerryking
Dear Book Lover: How to Get Kids to Read - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 1, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By CYNTHIA CROSSEN.
I know libraries are under the budget gun today, but I wish they worked
a little harder at sales. "Too many libraries run like 'Helpy-Selfy
Supermarkets,'" wrote Margaret A. Edwards in her tart manual/memoir
about libraries and young adults, "The Fair Garden and the Swarm of
Beasts." "Many other institutions that serve the public and believe in
their product put skilled salespeople on the floor, not behind desks
waiting for the customer to approach them."
reading  howto  youth  libraries  books  cultural_institutions  sales  selling  memoirs 
october 2010 by jerryking
Baby Face a Challenge in Start-up - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 9, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By SARAH E.
NEEDLEMAN For Mark Zuckerberg Wannabes, Sometimes It's Easy to Lose Face
youth  Sarah_E._Needleman  entrepreneurship  start_ups  college_moguls 
september 2010 by jerryking
Museums: No More 'Cathedrals of Culture' - WSJ.com
AUGUST 24, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JUDITH H.
DOBRZYNSKI .Current thinking goes much deeper. Many young directors see
museums as modern-day "town squares," social places where members of the
community may gather, drawn by art, perhaps, for conversation or music
or whatever. They believe that future museum-goers won't be satisfied by
simply looking at art, but rather prefer to participate in it or
interact with it.
museums  leadership  cultural_institutions  youth  quake  participation  participatory  customer_experience 
august 2010 by jerryking
Teen turns heads
Jul. 14, 2009 | The Globe & Mail | Susan Krashinsky
Morgan_Stanley  research  youth  Web_2.0 
july 2009 by jerryking
'Tis Not Simple to Give Gifts - WSJ.com
JULY 13, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by CHRISTIAN C. SAHNER.
Details the various efforts underway to teach young people about
charitable giving. Classes at more than 125 universities expose
students to the nonprofit world, mostly through managerial training,
accounting and study of nonprofit policy. Classes at a smaller number of
institutions try to examine philanthropy using a wider lens.
philanthropy  youth  charities  young_people 
may 2009 by jerryking
A mother's anguish, poignantly revealed
06-05-2008 The Globe and Mail column by Christie Blatchford on the JCA's Valerie Steele and her trial for perjury.
African_Canadians  youth  criminality  Christie_Blatchford 
january 2009 by jerryking

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