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joeybaker : agriculture   21

Virginia Tech researchers decipher and codify the universal language of honey bees
Researchers Margaret Couvillon and Roger Schürch have decoded the language of bees in a way that will allow other scientists across the globe to interpret the insects’ highly sophisticated and complex communications.
scienceAdvancement  agriculture 
23 days ago by joeybaker
Emerging land use practices rapidly increase soil organic matter
Agricultural practices can degrade soil conditions through the loss of organic matter, a situation that will be exacerbated with growing populations. Here, the authors show that converting cropland to management intensive grazing can rapidly improve soil quality and increase organic matter concentrations.
agriculture 
5 weeks ago by joeybaker
Scientists have genetically modified cassava, a staple crop in Africa, to contain more iron and zinc. The authors estimate that their GMO cassava could provide up to 50% of the dietary requirement for iron and up to 70% for zinc in children aged 1 to 6, m
One wonders how the anti-GMO movement could oppose something like this. But given their hostility to Golden Rice, which has been genetically modified to contain a vitamin A precursor to prevent blindness, they usually find a way.
scienceAdvancement  agriculture  casteingTheLowerClass  healthcare  popularStupidity 
10 weeks ago by joeybaker
Crops are rotting in fields as Trump’s trade war bites US farmers
The problem is worst for soybean farmers, as China generally buys around 60% of US crop.
agriculture  globalGameOfThrones  trumpIncompetence 
november 2018 by joeybaker
Growing native African shrubs side-by-side with the food crop millet increased millet production by more than 900%
The trick to boosting crops in drought-prone, food-insecure areas of West Africa could be a ubiquitous native shrub that persists in the toughest of growing conditions. Growing these shrubs side-by-side with the food crop millet increased millet production by more than 900 percent, according to a new study published in the journal Frontiers i...
agriculture  win  scienceAdvancement 
november 2018 by joeybaker
Honey bees exposed to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, lose some of the beneficial bacteria in their guts and are more susceptible to infection and death from harmful bacteria. Glyphosate might be contributing to the decline of honey bees and
Increased mortality of honey bee colonies has been attributed to several factors but is not fully understood. The herbicide glyphosate is expected to be innocuous to animals, including bees, because it targets an enzyme only found in plants and microorganisms. However, bees rely on a specialized gut microbiota that benefits growth and provides defense against pathogens. Most bee gut bacteria contain the enzyme targeted by glyphosate, but vary in whether they possess susceptible versions and, correspondingly, in tolerance to glyphosate. Exposing bees to glyphosate alters the bee gut community and increases susceptibility to infection by opportunistic pathogens. Understanding how glyphosate impacts bee gut symbionts and bee health will help elucidate a possible role of this chemical in colony decline. Glyphosate, the primary herbicide used globally for weed control, targets the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) enzyme in the shikimate pathway found in plants and some microorganisms. Thus, glyp
agriculture 
september 2018 by joeybaker
France becomes first country in Europe to ban all five pesticides killing bees - France will take a radical step towards protecting its dwindling bee population on Saturday by becoming the first country in Europe to ban all five pesticides researchers bel
France will take a radical step towards protecting its dwindling bee population on Saturday by becoming the first country in Europe to ban all five pesticides researchers believe are killing off the insects.
governmentIncompetence  agriculture  win 
september 2018 by joeybaker
A new study finds that farming crops with crushed rocks could help to improve global food security and reduce the amount of CO2 entering the atmosphere. The fast-reacting silicate rocks capture CO2 and give increased protection from pests and diseases whi
To reduce climate warming we must stop adding CO2 to the atmopshere, and develop approaches for removing it. Adding crushed, fast-reacting silicate rocks to croplands could improve productivity, restore soil quality and reduce atmospheric CO2.
scienceAdvancement  agriculture 
march 2018 by joeybaker

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