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joeybaker : humanpsycology   198

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Seven moral rules found all around the world in a survey of 60 cultures: help your family, help your group, return favors, be brave, defer to superiors, divide resources fairly, and respect others' property.
What is morality? And to what extent does it vary around the world? The theory of ‘morality-as-cooperation’ argues that morality consists of a collection of biological and cultural solutions to the problems of cooperation recurrent in human social life. These solutions or cooperative behaviors are plausible candidates for universal moral rules, and that morality-as-cooperation could provide the unified theory of morality that anthropology has hitherto lacked.
humanPsycology  humanHistory 
15 days ago by joeybaker
Rich students who have poor classmates become (i) more prosocial, generous, and egalitarian; and (ii) less likely to discriminate against poor students, and more willing to socialize with them. These effects are driven by personal interactions between ric
Familiarity Does Not Breed Contempt: Generosity, Discrimination, and Diversity in Delhi Schools by Gautam Rao. Published in volume 109, issue 3, pages 774-809 of American Economic Review, March 2019, Abstract: I exploit a natural experiment in Indian schools to study how being integrated with poor s...
humanPsycology  oligarchy 
19 days ago by joeybaker
People who believe in conspiracy theories are more likely to accept or engage in everyday criminal activity, such as trying to claim for replacement items, refunds or compensation from a shop when they were not entitled to do so, suggests a new study (n t
People who believe in conspiracy theories -- such as the theory that Princess Diana was murdered by the British establishment -- are more likely to accept or engage in everyday criminal activity.
humanPsycology 
22 days ago by joeybaker
High IQs aren’t going to be enough to stop an ecological disaster. It’s going to take social intelligence, too, finds a new study. The findings could help identify why some groups better manage shared resources, such as water or fisheries, than others
High IQs aren’t going to be enough to stop an ecological disaster. It’s going to take social intelligence, too. That’s the conclusion of a new study co-authored by a University of Central Florida researcher and published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications. The findings could help identify why some groups better manage shared resources, such […]
cyclesOfHumanHistory  popularStupidity  climateChange  humanPsycology  governmentIncompetence 
25 days ago by joeybaker
A new study finds that cutting your time on social media to 30 minutes a day reduces your risk of depression and loneliness
A new study from the University of Pennsylvania found that limiting social media usage to 30 minutes per day can lead to improvements in well-being.
humanPsycology 
november 2018 by joeybaker
Pediatric patients granted a wish by the Make-A-Wish Foundation were 2.5 times more likely to have fewer unplanned hospital admissions and 1.9 times more likely not to have to use the emergency department. This led to a decline in cost of care even after
In the retrospective study patients granted a wish were 2.5 times more likely to have fewer unplanned hospital admissions and 1.9 times more likely not to have to use the emergency department. This led to a decline in cost of care even after accounting for the average cost of the wish.
healthcare  humanPsycology 
november 2018 by joeybaker
Social media use increases depression and loneliness - In the first experimental study of Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram use, a University of Pennsylvania psychologist showed a causal link between time spent on the platforms and decreased well-being
Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram may not be great for personal well-being. In the first experimental study examining use of multiple platforms, Melissa G. Hunt of the University of Pennsylvania shows a causal link between time spent on these social media and increased depression and loneliness.
humanPsycology  advertising 
november 2018 by joeybaker
Dads may be more likely to vote for female political candidates if they have a daughter - but only if the daughter is their first-born child, finds new research. This phenomenon is called the “first-daughter effect,” and is stronger in Democrats than
Dads may be more likely to vote for female political candidates if they have a daughter — but only if the daughter is their first-born child. That’s the finding of a new research paper by Jill Greenlee, associate professor of politics and women’s, gender and sexuality studies, and several colleagues at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. The paper was published online on October 31 in the journal Political Behavior. In a second paper, published in September in Public Opinion Quarterly, Greenlee’s research team found that dads with daughters were more likely to support policies designed to increase gender equality — but again, only if the daughter was the first-born offspring. Taken together, the impact of a child’s gender on her father’s politics is what the researchers call the “first-daughter effect.” The effect is stronger in Democrats than Republicans.
humanPsycology  sexism 
november 2018 by joeybaker
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