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juliusbeezer : children   14

Parents: don't panic about Momo – worry about YouTube Kids instead | Keza MacDonald | Opinion | The Guardian
The majority of YouTube Kids content isn’t distressing or disturbing – but it is mostly brain-numbingly terrible. A vast amount of the kid-friendly videos that are uploaded are straight-up garbage: cheap, algorithm-driven songs or nonsensical stories featuring 3D models or toys of popular characters such as Elsa, Spider-Man and Peppa Pig. They are designed purely to extract views and thereby money from common search terms – not to entertain or educate kids. Friends with young children regularly complain about the inane surprise-egg or toy review videos that have become household obsessions. My toddler would watch cheap, repetitive, unbearably cheery nursery rhyme videos for an hour if I let him.

The easiest solution for parents of young children might be to purge YouTube from everything – phones, TVs, games consoles, iPads, the lot. This is the approach we’ve taken in our household, which inconveniently contains two video games journalists and, consequently, an absurd number of devices. You don’t need to be a tech luddite to find YouTube Kids both irritating and vaguely worrying. There is no shortage of good children’s entertainment available on Netflix, through BBC iPlayer and catch-up TV, or through advert-free games designed for young players. And there’s zero chance they’ll come across any suicide tips there.

youtube  children  socialmedia  video  television 
march 2019 by juliusbeezer
Young child on bike hospitalised after collision with lorry in Dublin city centre - Dublin Live
A young child was hospitalised this morning after they were knocked off a bike by a lorry in the city centre.

The incident happened shortly after 9:30am on Ship Street, at the junction with Stephen Street.

The child was taken to hospital with minor injuries after the accident.

They were riding a small orange bike with stabilisers when they came in contact with the lorry.

Pictures from the scene show the kids bike underneath the lorry as traffic tries to get by.
crash_report  children  cycling  ireland 
january 2019 by juliusbeezer
Mom Lets Her Kids Walk to the Bakery Down the Block. Child Protective Services Tells Her, "Never Again Till They Are 12." - Let Grow
On this day, it was lunchtime and my kids wanted cheese sticks from the bakery. The 7-year-old was excited to go and the 3-year-old decided to tag along and I was like, "Okay." My kids tend to be cautious, so I'm happy when they show a desire for something like that. If I stand on the sidewalk I can see them almost until they enter the bakery, and then I can see them on the way back. They left my sight for about three minutes. How awful, right?

They ran back happily and excited. But then I saw someone following close behind them. It wasn't my neighbor or someone I knew -- it was someone on her lunch break. And when she got close she kind of looked at me and said, "Is everything okay?" And I said, "Yes, I'm watching where they're going. They're practicing their independence."
politics  children  canada 
december 2018 by juliusbeezer
London air pollution is poisoning my son, says campaigner | Environment | The Guardian
Smith said that he first became concerned about the air pollution crisis after his two youngest children – a daughter, 10 months, and Ely, now three – were born prematurely and “on the cusp” of being underweight. His daughter has since suffered serious respiratory problems, and now has medication and medical equipment to help her breathe.

Sitting at his kitchen table, Smith says his wife, a lawyer in central London, travelled to work as usual during both pregnancies, walking along a busy road to the tube. “You can’t attribute these things definitively to air pollution but the more you find out the more you realise the huge damage it is doing to our children’s health,” he said.

The family, who do not own a car, now carefully plan every journey. They avoid main roads, the rush hour and busy bus stops wherever possible. But it is not easy. “There is only so much you can do when in a big city like this. To a certain extent, we have got to accept now that we are doing great damage to our children’s long-term health simply by living here.”
airpollution  London  driving  children  politics 
september 2018 by juliusbeezer
Why children struggle to cross busy streets safely: New research shows perceptual judgment, motor skills not fully developed until age 14 -- ScienceDaily
New research from the University of Iowa shows children under certain ages lack the perceptual judgment and motor skills to cross a busy road consistently without putting themselves in danger. The researchers placed children from 6 to 14 years old in a realistic simulated environment and asked them to cross one lane of a busy road multiple times.

The results: Children up to their early teenage years had difficulty consistently crossing the street safely, with accident rates as high as 8 percent with 6-year-olds. Only by age 14 did children navigate street crossing without incident, while 12-year-olds mostly compensated for inferior road-crossing motor skills by choosing bigger gaps in traffic.
cycling  road_safety  children  walking  driving 
september 2018 by juliusbeezer
Feeding your baby solids early may help them sleep, study suggests | Life and style | The Guardian
More than 1300 healthy breastfed three-month-olds were split randomly into two groups in one the babies were exclusively breastfed until they were six months old – as current guidelines recommend – while children in the other group were breastfed and given solid foods, including peanuts, eggs and wheat, from the age of three months, in addition to breastfeeding. After six months babies in both groups were eating a range of solids.

The children’s health and behaviour was followed for three years, with their sleep and consumption of solid food tracked by families through questionnaires.

While not all babies were kept to their allotted regime, on average, babies who were in the breastfeeding only group were first introduced to solids at around 23 weeks, while those in the other group encountered the foods at around 16 weeks

The results, based on data from 1,162 infants and taking into account factors such birth weight and whether children had eczema, reveal babies introduced to solids from three months slept, on average, two hours more a week at the age of six months, than the babies who were only breastfed. They also woke around two fewer times at night per week at six months and had just over 9% fewer incidents of waking up during the night over the course of the study.

The team found that the more closely parents stuck to the early introduction programme, the stronger the effect.
breastfeeding  children  sleep  health 
july 2018 by juliusbeezer
How Peppa Pig became a video nightmare for children | Technology | The Guardian
Whether these videos are deliberately malicious, “merely” trolling, or the emergent effect of complex systems, isn’t the point. What’s new is that the system in which such violence proliferates is right in front of us, and visibly complicit, if we choose to see it for what it is. I titled that original essay “Something is wrong on the internet” because it seemed and still seems to me that the issues made glaringly obvious by the scandal are not limited to children’s content, nor to YouTube. First among these is how systems of algorithmic governance, rather than leading us towards the sunny uplands of equality and empowerment, continually re-enact and reinforce our existing prejudices, while oppressing those with the least understanding of, and thus power over, the systems they’re enmeshed in.

Take YouTube’s recommendation system for starters, which doesn’t differentiate between Disney movies and a grainy animation cooked up by a bot farm in China. Essentially what the seemingly benign “if you like that, you’ll like this” mechanism is doing is training young children – practically from birth – to click on the first thing that comes along, regardless of the source.
internet  youtube  video  children 
june 2018 by juliusbeezer
Nantes. Un enfant de trois ans percuté par un fourgon de livraison. Info - Nantes.maville.com
Terrible accident, vendredi 4 mai, dans la petite rue Fulton, quartier Mellinet, à Nantes.

Vers 17 h 30, une mère de famille qui chargeait sa voiture a vu son enfant lui échapper et traverser subitement la route.

Un fourgon de livraison arrivait précisément à cet instant. Et le chauffeur n’a pas l’enfant surgir et le fourgon l'a percuté. Les secours l’ont transporté, dans un état jugé très préoccupant, aux Urgences du CHU.
crash_report  nantes  children 
may 2018 by juliusbeezer
The day I accidentally killed a little boy - BBC News
The road started out as freeway but quickly became a rural highway, one lane in each direction. The speed limit was 45 or 50mph, fairly fast for that kind of road, it was quite busy and I was in a line of cars doing the speed limit.

I passed a little outpost of houses whose mailboxes were on the opposite side of the street. As I passed the houses a little blond boy darted out, moving from the mailbox to his house. I saw him at the last second. I tried to swerve. There was no way to miss him.

I hit the little boy and he flew up into the air and then landed on the pavement. I pulled over and ran across the street.

I was so distressed that I don't really remember those minutes. I was hiding behind a bush and screaming. I heard myself and I thought, "What is that? Who's doing that?"

And then I realised it was me.
crash_report  walking  children  driving 
january 2018 by juliusbeezer
The impact of parenthood on environmental attitudes and behaviour: a longitudinal investigation of the legacy hypothesis | SpringerLink
This paper explored whether having children leads to changes in individual-level environmental attitudes and behaviours, possibly as an effect of having greater consideration for future generations (the ‘legacy hypothesis’). Using the Understanding Society Survey, changes in three environmental attitude items and the frequency of 11 environmental behaviours were assessed for those who had children in between two waves of data collection. We examined four groups of people: those who had at least one new child (irrespective of whether this was a firstborn or not), those who became a parent for the first time, first-time parents with high environmental concern and first-time mothers. Our analysis showed only small changes in individual-level environmental attitudes and behaviours following people having a new child. In contrast with expectations from the legacy hypothesis, all changes were negative, indicating the environmental behaviours were performed less often. The only observed positive change was an increase in the desire to act more sustainably amongst first-time parents who already had a high level of environmental concern. Overall, the results do not provide support for the legacy hypothesis. Where there are any changes, these are more likely to be negative, suggesting that having a child reduces self-reported environmental behaviours.
climatechange  psychology  parents  children  research 
december 2017 by juliusbeezer
American Academy of Pediatrics Announces New Recommendations for Children’s Media Use
For children younger than 18 months, avoid use of screen media other than video-chatting. Parents of children 18 to 24 months of age who want to introduce digital media should choose high-quality programming, and watch it with their children to help them understand what they're seeing.
For children ages 2 to 5 years, limit screen use to 1 hour per day of high-quality programs. Parents should co-view media with children to help them understand what they are seeing and apply it to the world around them.
For children ages 6 and older, place consistent limits on the time spent using media, and the types of media, and make sure media does not take the place of adequate sleep, physical activity and other behaviors essential to health.
Designate media-free times together, such as dinner or driving, as well as media-free locations at home, such as bedrooms.
Have ongoing communication about online citizenship and safety, including treating others with respect online and offline.
socialmedia  television  children 
december 2017 by juliusbeezer
Roy Moore is not a pedophile -- why it matters | Practical Ethics
pedophilia and child sexual assault are two different things, and conflating them is not a good idea. This is not just a matter of semantics. For one thing, confusing psychiatric disorders (requiring treatment) and sex crimes (which may or may not follow from such disorders) is likely to hamper clear moral reasoning. But more importantly, it may actually increase harm to children.

Consider the following: many people with pedophilia (1) hate their desires, (2) do not act on them for moral reasons (and should therefore plausibly be praised rather than vilified), and yet (3) often do not seek treatment precisely because they are aware that people in general cannot seem to tell the difference between:

(a) feeling involuntarily sexually attracted to young children (not wrong in and of itself), and

(b) molesting or sexually assaulting children (very wrong in and of itself, no matter the reason).

And here’s the kicker: failing to seek treatment for (a) is precisely the sort of thing that makes (b) more likely to happen.
psychology  sex  crime  children 
november 2017 by juliusbeezer
Helping children develop resilience, manage stress and strong emotions using the ‘90 Second Rule’ | A Lust For Life
it only takes 90 seconds for the stress chemicals produced by this response to be flushed out of our systems at a biological level. This is such an empowering fact, as it means that if we allow the strong emotion to surge through us for those ninety seconds without interference, it can pass and we can then respond on a calmer level, from a position of more self-control. On a neurobiological level, these 90 seconds give us time to access the pre-frontal cortex, and choose a more adaptive response.

This is easier said than done, as once the emotion takes hold on a physiological level, it is our interferences on the thought level which can perpetuate it. This is where a spiral of automatic negative thoughts can often kick in, and our self-talk becomes destructive and damaging. Our minds can go into overdrive at this point, remembering similar incidents from the past or imagining future implications. The amygdala doesn’t get a chance to become inhibited, and so our higher order brain remains out of reach. If left unchecked, this pattern of response can become habitual, with subsequent damage to so many life domains, including relationships, self-esteem and overall well-being.

To help children to use and remember the 90 second rule, I have devised a strategy for dealing with stress and strong emotions called N.A.B.B. Each of the letters stands for an action which the child carries out; in doing so it allows 90 seconds to pass without negative thought interference.

The strategy works as follows:

N: Name the strong emotion. Research has shown that the act of naming an emotion engages the prefrontal cortex, thus allowing higher order thinking processes to become engaged.

A: Accept the strong emotion. The emotion has occurred, so there is no point trying to suppress or question it at this point- these actions can engage automatic negative patterns of thought.

B: Breathe! By bringing awareness to the breath, the waves of emotion can be surfed and allowed to pass. Keeping attention on the breath also helps to keep negative thought processes at bay.

B: Body: Connect to your body as you breathe. Try to feel your breath going right down to your feet!
emotion  psychology  education  children 
may 2017 by juliusbeezer
How to Raise a Creative Child. Step One: Back Off - NYTimes.com
So what does it take to raise a creative child? One study compared the families of children who were rated among the most creative 5 percent in their school system with those who were not unusually creative. The parents of ordinary children had an average of six rules, like specific schedules for homework and bedtime. Parents of highly creative children had an average of fewer than one rule.

Creativity may be hard to nurture, but it’s easy to thwart. By limiting rules, parents encouraged their children to think for themselves. They tended to “place emphasis on moral values, rather than on specific rules,” the Harvard psychologist Teresa Amabile reports.

Even then, though, parents didn’t shove their values down their children’s throats. When psychologists compared America’s most creative architects with a group of highly skilled but unoriginal peers, there was something unique about the parents of the creative architects: “Emphasis was placed on the development of one’s own ethical code.”

Yes, parents encouraged their children to pursue excellence and success — but they also encouraged them to find “joy in work.” Their children had freedom to sort out their own values and discover their own interests.
education  creativity  children 
december 2016 by juliusbeezer

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