recentpopularlog in

kme : collaboration   246

« earlier  
Uploading big files > 512MB — ownCloud 8.0 Server Administration Manual 8.0 documentation
Via https://github.com/owncloud/core/issues/13721.
Set the following two parameters inside the corresponding .ini file:
<code class="language-ini">php_value upload_max_filesize = 16G
php_value post_max_size = 16G
</code>

Adjust these values for your needs. If you see PHP timeouts in your logfiles, increase the timeout values, which are in seconds:
<code class="language-ini">php_value max_input_time 3600
php_value max_execution_time 3600</code>
webmaster  sysadmin  owncloud  bigfiles  uploader  filesharing  collaboration  solution 
november 2019 by kme
How Slack Harms Projects – Silas Reinagel
Because of the ability to quickly follow up messages with other messages, and the natural disposition towards short messages, the natural tendency of most information works is to message first, think later.

Got a half-formulated question? Send a group message.
Don’t want to Google something? Send a group message.
Unsure if the software is working correctly? Send a group message with a bunch of @ tags.
Want to ask someone specific about something? Say “Hello” and wait for a bit before stating the real purpose of a message.

Real-time messaging encourages little thinking, and brings many people to waste time while staring at the “XYZ is typing a message…” indicator in the bottom-corner.

Both Emails and Tickets are a much more professional business communication medium, since they encourage providing all the information BEFORE clicking send rather than after.


From the comments:
Are you familiar with Marshal McLuhan's idea that "The Medium is the Message"?

If you are, then you will understand that real-time chat systems are, by their very nature, communicating that what is recent is the most important thing, and what isn't recent is unimportant and hardly worth seeing.

While people can build effective strategies to minimize the impact of a given medium (like my father, a very successful electrical engineer, did with television, by having only a 5-inch black and white television, and keeping it under the sink, when I was growing up), that doesn't change the way a given medium generally impacts people.

The problem is the tool itself. The urgency is a partial by-product of the tool.


See also: https://disqus.com/by/disqus_qfS4hiBdrC/
slack  chat  consideredharmful  workplace  productivity  collaboration  culture  immediacy  instantgratification  forthecomments 
october 2019 by kme
Feature Highlight: Set Due Dates for Issues and Create Milestones | GitLab | https://about.gitlab.com/
GitLab has a powerful issue tracker that completely integrates into the GitLab workflow. Our team uses our issue tracker for almost everything, including projects that contain no code. We believe that if anything is significant enough to work on then it deserves an issue. Before GitLab 8.7, there was no way to communicate that you needed a specific issue to be completed by a specified time. While we had the ability to add milestones to issues and merge requests, there was no way to s...
gitlab  issues  collaboration  workflow  bestpractices 
march 2019 by kme
riseuplabs / crabgrass · GitLab | https://0xacab.org/
Crabgrass is a web application designed for activist groups to be better able to collaborate online. Mostly, it is a glorified wiki with fine-grain control over access rights.
ruby  rails  wiki  collaboration  activism  webapp  samplecode  webdevel 
february 2019 by kme
StackExchange/blackbox: Safely store secrets in Git/Mercurial/Subversion | https://github.com/
Safely store secrets in Git/Mercurial/Subversion. Contribute to StackExchange/blackbox development by creating an account on GitHub.

Slides: https://www.slideshare.net/TomLimoncelli/the-blackbox-project-sfae
secrets  devel  git  security  crypto  encryption  puppet  collaboration 
february 2019 by kme
The Biases That Punish Racially Diverse Teams | https://hbr.org/
One possibility for this failure is that the purported benefits of diversity are more hype than reality, but that’s unlikely given the ample research that speaks against this claim. Racially diverse groups of jurors exchange a wider range of information during deliberations than racially homogeneous groups, for example. Diverse groups of traders are less likely to make inaccurate judgments when trading stocks. Gender diversity in top management teams improves firm performance, especially when innovation is a strategic focus. And our own past research helped establish the fact that the mere presence of diversity can lead groups to work harder, share unique perspectives, be more open to new ideas, and perform better, especially when groups need to share information and resolve differences of opinion.

The findings were striking. When reading a transcript with pictures revealing the group’s composition, racially diverse teams were perceived as having more relationship conflict than homogeneous ones. And they were less likely to receive additional resources because of these biased perceptions of conflict — even though the objective content of the group interaction was exactly the same.

Diverse groups were perceived as having more relationship conflict, and because of this, financial resources were less likely to be given to them than to homogeneous groups. The diverse groups were handicapped, potentially derailing future success.

So what can organizations do to combat this bias against diverse groups? At a basic level, an important first step is to cultivate an awareness of this bias in those responsible for evaluating diverse teams. [...]

Second, managers should rely upon clear standards of performance set before — not during — group observation instead of making performance and resource determinations in the middle of the process. [...]

Finally, a little advice for the diverse teams themselves: You have to play offense and ensure that managers see and value when things are going smoothly on the team.
teamwork  collaboration  diversity  multiculturalism  bias  racialbais  management 
december 2018 by kme
The Shame of Pair Programming | Diary of a ScrumMaster | https://diaryofascrummaster.wordpress.com/
To pair requires vulnerability. It means sharing all that you know and all that you don’t know. This is hard for us. Programmers are supposed to be smart, really-crazy-smart. Most people look at what we do and say “I could never do that.” It makes us feel a bit special, gives us a sense of pride and pride creates invulnerability. I often hear stories that infer “I’ll just go and do some magic and if it takes a long time you can bet I made miracles happen”.

When done well, the shame of pairing quickly evaporates. As you start to realise that, between the stuff you know and the stuff they know, you can be twice as good; pairing becomes joyous. Together we find solutions that would be out of reach if we were alone.

Also, a shout-out to Brené Brown:
It’s hard. Pairing well takes empathy, empathy evaporates shame, allowing courage. As Brené Brown says “Vulnerability is the birthplace of Innovation, Creativity and Change”
pairing  pride  collaboration  devel  programming  pairprogramming  vulnerability 
december 2018 by kme
To Pair or Not to Pair: Pair Programming - YouTube | https://www.youtube.com/
Lady's from ThoughtWorks (https://www.thoughtworks.com/), and if that's sounds familiar, that's because they're the Selenium and GoCD people.

Benefits mentioned in the video:
1. knowledge sharing (1 + 1 > 2)
2. combines two modes of thinking: tactical (driver: local optimization), strategic (navigator: big picture)
3. reflection (on the story, value-added, effectiveness vs. # of LOC)
4. helps coder / team focus; discipline around structure of code, strategy, explain and justify choices, avoid rabbit holes
5. "I get more programming productivity" out of reducing time that I'm stuck than from increasing my speed when I'm not stuck."
6. helps practice "true" CI--code review on-the-go; more collective code ownership; >> trunk-based development

Tips:
1. don't do it for 8 hours a day
2. take breaks; it's exhausting
3. even skill levels
4. share feedback (I don't like it when ...), exchange READMEs
5. "the shame of pair programming"; requires vulnerability

Homogeneous teams feel easier, but easy is bad for performance. (ref: https://hbr.org/2016/09/diverse-teams-feel-less-comfortable-and-thats-why-they-perform-better)

The authors are saying that this idea goes against many people's intuition, and often if there's something counter-intuitive, there's a cognitive bias hidden away somewhere, right?

And the one that they're mentioning here is the "fluency heuristic," which says that we prefer information that is more easily processed, and if it's easily-processed, we think that it's more true, more right, more beautiful, and that serves us very well in a lot of situations in software development. We want readable code, easily-processable things. But I don't think that it serves us well if we think that's why we're not doing pair programming.

So, pairing feels hard, but that doesn't mean that it's not good for performance, and also it doesn't have to stay hard.

Ways to make it easier (reduce friction, conflict, anxiety):
1. get the talking going
2. active listening
3. friendly feedback
4. answer why

See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S92vVAEofes
agile  cs  programming  pairing  pairprogramming  teamwork  collaboration  communication  conference  talk  video 
december 2018 by kme
The War on Developer Productivity (And How I Intend to Win It) - derrickreimer.com
Chat is a greedy mode of communication.

* It doesn’t care if you are deep in flow.
* It begs you to incessantly clear its notification badges.
* It buries important conversations among idle chatter when you snooze it.
* It must be used with restraint or it becomes toxic.
workplace  productivity  chatapps  slack  distraction  chat  collaboration  communication 
june 2018 by kme
Google's Unwritten Rule for Team Collaboration | http://blog.idonethis.com/
That social code was tacitly agreed upon, and usually instituted by the managers: the most collaborative teams, even if they have a single leader or moderator, were ones where everyone spoke equally.

This fact wasn’t written down anywhere, or decided upon by management. The teams themselves didn’t even notice they were doing it. But researchers recognized that less successful teams were the ones where a manager spoke 80% of the time or more. In successful collaborative teams, everyone engaged in “conversational turn-taking”—one of the most human things we do— whether it was through a daily standup or a monthly check-in.

Since the conversation wasn’t monopolized by one person, they were able to ask clarifying questions and give their input. In situations where only one person speaks, team members didn’t feel comfortable voicing their ideas, chiming in on other peoples’, or correcting their more vocal team members’ mistakes. Imbalanced communication, in short, defeated the purpose of collaborating in the first place.
teamwork  collaboration  communication  bestpractices 
november 2017 by kme
Just Because I'm Nice, Don't Assume I'm Dumb
For example, mothers, like the elderly, are chronically stereotyped as less competent (although warmer) than other workers and as a result are often underpromoted and underpaid.
competence  prejudice  snapjudgement  collaboration  leadership 
november 2017 by kme
The crowdsourcing fallacy – Wikimedia Blog | https://blog.wikimedia.org/
Your crowdsourcing effort will most likely fail if…

your crowd is not diverse.
your crowd all thinks alike.
their task is not clear.
their mission is not compelling.
the technical platform is poorly designed or overly complicated.
there are not continued areas for growth and engagement over time.
the interface and the organizers are not responsive to change.
the community lacks social moderation or healthy behavioral norms.
it lacks mechanisms to address technical abuse and human harassment.
you do not recognize or empower the core users of your platform.
you lock it down and people have to jump through hoops to participate.
potential users lack free time, skills, access or awareness to contribute.
volunteers are hampered by legal restrictions or monetization attempts.
another more interesting or better crafted opportunity comes along.
you never attract enough people to have a crowd in the first place.
crowdsourcing  collaboration 
october 2017 by kme
Sparrow - Your Own Scripting Platform | https://sparrowhub.org/

Sparrow Features

SparrowHub is the repository of sparrow plugins - reusable scripts.
Sparrow plugins are packaged scripts distributed across your team.
Sparrow supports one of languages on your choice - Perl5, Bash, Python, Ruby.
Choose your language when creating sparrow plugins
Sparrow provides universal way to search/install/configure and run scripts independently of your platform.
Sparrow scripts will work at any Linux OS, provided that you have Perl5 installed.
After all - SparrowHub/Sparrow is active network of scripts written by people for people.
packagemanagement  sysadmin  collaboration  hpc  perl 
october 2017 by kme
Easy scheduling | Doodle
I like the 'whenisgood.net' interface better.
calendar  scheduling  schedule  webapp  collaboration 
april 2017 by kme
publications - What is the preferable way to share data? - Academia Stack Exchange
OSF and GitHub are mentioned.
Registry of Research Data Repositories (www.re3data.org) was a new one.
collaboration  research  sharing  data  bestpractices  advice 
february 2017 by kme
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read