recentpopularlog in

kme : diversity   32

The Biases That Punish Racially Diverse Teams | https://hbr.org/
One possibility for this failure is that the purported benefits of diversity are more hype than reality, but that’s unlikely given the ample research that speaks against this claim. Racially diverse groups of jurors exchange a wider range of information during deliberations than racially homogeneous groups, for example. Diverse groups of traders are less likely to make inaccurate judgments when trading stocks. Gender diversity in top management teams improves firm performance, especially when innovation is a strategic focus. And our own past research helped establish the fact that the mere presence of diversity can lead groups to work harder, share unique perspectives, be more open to new ideas, and perform better, especially when groups need to share information and resolve differences of opinion.

The findings were striking. When reading a transcript with pictures revealing the group’s composition, racially diverse teams were perceived as having more relationship conflict than homogeneous ones. And they were less likely to receive additional resources because of these biased perceptions of conflict — even though the objective content of the group interaction was exactly the same.

Diverse groups were perceived as having more relationship conflict, and because of this, financial resources were less likely to be given to them than to homogeneous groups. The diverse groups were handicapped, potentially derailing future success.

So what can organizations do to combat this bias against diverse groups? At a basic level, an important first step is to cultivate an awareness of this bias in those responsible for evaluating diverse teams. [...]

Second, managers should rely upon clear standards of performance set before — not during — group observation instead of making performance and resource determinations in the middle of the process. [...]

Finally, a little advice for the diverse teams themselves: You have to play offense and ensure that managers see and value when things are going smoothly on the team.
teamwork  collaboration  diversity  multiculturalism  bias  racialbais  management 
december 2018 by kme
Diverse Teams Feel Less Comfortable — and That’s Why They Perform Better | https://hbr.org/
Via: "To Pair or Not to Pair: Pair Programming" - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u_eZ-ae2FY8
With so much at stake, why aren’t these companies making more headway? One reason could be that, despite the evidence about their results, homogenous teams just feel more effective. In addition, people believe that diverse teams breed greater conflict than they actually do. Bringing these biases to light may enable ways to combat them.
After collectively naming their suspect, members individually rated aspects of the discussion. More diverse groups — those joined by someone from outside their own fraternity or sorority — judged the team interactions to be less effective than did groups joined by insiders. They were also less confident in their final decisions.

Intuitively, this makes sense: On a homogenous team, people readily understand each other and collaboration flows smoothly, giving the sensation of progress. Dealing with outsiders causes friction, which feels counterproductive.

But in this case their judgments were starkly wrong. Among groups where all three original members didn’t already know the correct answer, adding an outsider versus an insider actually doubled their chance of arriving at the correct solution, from 29% to 60%. The work felt harder, but the outcomes were better.

In fact, working on diverse teams produces better outcomes precisely because it’s harder.
This idea goes against many people’s intuitions. There’s a common bias that psychologists call the fluency heuristic: We prefer information that is processed more easily, or fluently, judging it to be truer or more beautiful. The effect partially explains that we gain greater appreciation of songs or paintings when they become familiar because they’re more easily processed. The fluency heuristic leads many people to study incorrectly; they often simply reread the material. The information becomes more familiar without much effort, and so they feel that they’re learning. But in a 2011 study students performed better on a test after studying the text once and then trying to recall as much as they could, a strenuous task, than they did by repeatedly going over the text, even though they predicted that rereading was the key to learning. Similarly, confronting opinions you disagree with might not seem like the quickest path to getting things done, but working in groups can be like studying (or exercising): no pain, no gain.
In one study MBA students were asked to imagine that they were comanaging several four-person teams of interns, and that one team had asked for additional resources. They saw photos of the members, depicting four white men, four black men, or two of each. They then read a transcript of a discussion among the group and rated the team on various factors. Teams of four white men and four black men were seen as having equal levels of relationship conflict, but the diverse teams were seen as having more relationship conflict than the homogeneous teams, even though everyone had read the same transcript.
For example, research suggests that when people with different perspectives are brought together, people may seek to gloss over those differences in the interest of group harmony — when, in fact, differences should actually be taken seriously and highlighted. In a 2012 study teams of three were tasked with generating a creative business plan for a theater. On some teams, members were assigned distinct roles (Artistic, Event, and Finance Manager), thus increasing diversity of viewpoints. These teams came up with better ideas than homogeneous teams — but only if they’d been explicitly told to try to take the perspectives of their teammates. They had to face up to their differences in order to benefit from them.
Another way to take advantage of differing viewpoints is to highlight the value of multiculturalism. One 2009 study looked at support for multiculturalism versus colorblindness in nearly 4,000 employees in 18 work units at a large U.S. health care firm. The more that workers agreed that “employees should recognize and celebrate racial and ethnic differences” and the more they disagreed that “employees should downplay their racial and ethnic differences,” the more that minorities in those units reported feeling engaged in their work. In another 2009 study, pairs of students, one white and one Aboriginal Canadian, were teamed up for a conversation. Prefacing the meeting with a message supporting multiculturalism (versus no message) made the meeting more positive, while a message endorsing colorblindness led whites to turn negative toward their minority partners.
teamwork  diversity  cognitivebias  bias  pairing  pairprogramming  groupthink  fluencyheuristic  nopainnogain  multiculturalism 
december 2018 by kme
Why Is the Green Movement Still So White? - Narratively
Among the big greens, Earthjustice is often considered a leader in addressing diversity. Over the past six years, its staff went from 20 percent people of color to nearly 40 percent. Chas Lopez is determined to keep that percentage climbing; he joined the organization in September 2015 as its first vice president of diversity and inclusion.

Speaking one-on-one with his colleagues during a listening tour of Earthjustice outposts across the country, several themes emerged, Lopez says. Some of those went into the development of a three-pronged rubric for identifying future Earthjustice hires: All of them would need to have functional skill, emotional intelligence, and cultural competency.

Those attributes allow candidates to sidestep the whole cultural misunderstanding bugaboo, Lopez says, both inside the Earthjustice office, and — just as importantly — in the outside world when the organization’s lawyers are representing clients, a large percentage of whom come from environmental justice communities.
environmentaljustice  environment  diversity 
november 2017 by kme
Perl: The Next Generation - YouTube
This is my "secret" diversity talk aimed at the guys and focusing on how good, but homogenous, people can create an unwelcoming community without realizing it. The solution lies in restructuring how we make decisions, it lies in Kirk vs Picard. And anybody can be a Picard.


A fucking awesome talk that just lays it all out. Favorite quote "Have we optimized for thick-skinned library developers?"
perl  memes  humor  conference  talk  video  programming  diversity 
august 2017 by kme
The lack of diversity in philosophy is blocking its progress | Aeon Ideas
Second, although philosophy doesn’t simply march forward, it does benefit from encountering and absorbing new perspectives. In How to Do Things with Pornography (2015), Nancy Bauer emphasises the ‘progress that results when people – and not just professional philosophers – commit themselves to the task of making their own most deeply held assumptions … visible and subjecting them to scrutiny’. Philosophical education is about challenging all people to reason for themselves, and much philosophical scholarship is about finding important ideas in what other people have thought and said.
I had no background in classical Indian philosophy, but have dipped my toe in lately. Given my linguistic limitations, I’ve mostly read works by North American scholars who analyse ancient South Asian writers: works such as The Bodhisattva’s Brain, Mark Siderits’s Buddhism as Philosophy (2007), Barbara Stoler Miller’s 1986 translation of the Bhagavad-Gita, and Pankaj Mishra’s An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World (2004).
philosophy  education  diversity 
july 2016 by kme
Diversity Training Doesn’t Work - HBR [https://hbr.org/]
Which, if you think about it, is the essential problem of prejudice in the first place. People aren’t prejudiced against real people; they’re prejudiced against categories. “Sure, John is gay,” they’ll say, “but he’s not like other gays.” Their problem isn’t with John, but with gay people in general.

Categories are dehumanizing. They simplify the complexity of a human being. So focusing people on the categories increases their prejudice.

The solution? Instead of seeing people as categories, we need to see people as people. Stop training people to be more accepting of diversity. It’s too conceptual, and it doesn’t work.


From the comments:
That being said, the language of D&I is divisive, the advocacy approach is met with both overt and covert hostility because of the inherent accusatory and incursive characteristics of D&I interventions, and most of these efforts are doomed to fail strictly because top leadership cannot usually last long enough to kill off the deep state original culture within an organization while at the same time stemming the flow of new prejudices into the organization.
diversity  workplace  collaboration  teamwork  womenintech 
april 2015 by kme
How I Got 50% Women Speakers at My Tech Conference | Geek Feminism Blog
So! Getting women to submit content: easy? Um. When I’d talk to men about the conference and ask if they felt like they had an idea to submit for a talk, they’d *always* start brainstorming on the spot. I’m not generalizing — every guy I talked to about speaking was able to come up with an idea, or multiple ideas, right away…and yet, overwhelmingly the women I talked to with the same pitch deferred with a, “well, but I’m not an expert on anything,” or “I wouldn’t know what to submit,” or “yes but I’m not a *lead* [title], so you should talk to my boss and see if he’d want to present.”


from the comments:
For me, this is the primary key. I’d submit if I had any reasonable assurance that merit would trump gender when it came to selection. When that assurance isn’t there, I don’t submit. And that’s because I suspect there’s a pile for men and a pile for “girls”, and only one gets in, as a token. I don’t want to be a token, and for the men who may be reading this and don’t understand why, here’s why: In every tech gathering that’s predominantly men, there’s always some percentage of misogynists. And non-misogynist guys don’t often confront the misogynist ones. So what happens is the dicks treat you like shit, the other guys tacitly sanction it by not rocking the boat, and the effect is that you, as the lone female, have won the great honor of being the conference’s whipping girl. No human volunteers for abuse. This is why women don’t submit.
gender  diversity  conference  notjustwhitedudes  womenintech  feminism  ws  forthecomments  mentoring 
february 2014 by kme

Copy this bookmark:





to read