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Jordan Peterson, Custodian of the Patriarchy - The New York Times
The lesson most patients need to hear, he says, is “grow the hell up, accept some responsibility, live an honorable life.”

“We just haven’t talked about that in any compelling way in three generations,” he says. “Probably since the beginning of the ’60s.”

The left, he believes, refuses to admit that men might be in charge because they are better at it. “The people who hold that our culture is an oppressive patriarchy, they don’t want to admit that the current hierarchy might be predicated on competence,” he said.


Clarifications from the comments:
Enforced monogamy means socially enforced monogamy, ie “going steady” or getting married, and breaking down the acceptability of the hookup culture. This paper itself has done stories on how this culture actually isn’t what many women want, but feel forced into, and how this culture leads indirectly to the #metoo transgressions. It’s also linked non-monogamy, and as a result fatherlessness, to poorer outcomes for kids.
masculinity  gender  patriarchy  mensrights 
june 2019 by kme
Another Side of #MeToo: Male Managers Fearful of Mentoring Women - The New York Times | https://www.nytimes.com/
“A number of men have told me that they will avoid going to dinner with a female mentee, or that they’re concerned about deploying a woman solo on-site with a male,” Ms. Milligan said. “People are concerned and have questions.”

“If we allow this to happen, it will set us back decades,” Ms. Milligan said. “Women have to be sponsored by leaders, and leaders are still mostly men.”

The main focus now, she said, is education. When male executives tell her that they are considering deliberately avoiding women, she tells them bluntly that would be illegal. “Just replace the word ‘woman’ with any minority,” she said. “Yes, you have to talk about the right kind of behavior, but you can’t stop interacting with women.”
leadership  gender  workplace  management  mentoring 
february 2019 by kme
Opinion | The Best Book for 2018 Is 25 Years Old - The New York Times
It has become fashionable for writers to talk about the transformative power of empathy in fiction. But that potential is realized only when empathy is deployed in conjunction with an understanding of power and how it functions.

Jess continually marks the ways oppressive systems are most damaging — the way they force those who are oppressed to hate themselves and identify with their oppressor. And to navigate them, you are often asked to kill off any feeling or natural part of yourself to survive.
opression  activism  gender  passing 
june 2018 by kme
Conjuring Up a Career with One of NYC’s Only Female Magicians | http://narrative.ly/
At forty-five, Solomon is one of the few professional female magicians in New York City, having broken into a “male-populated” field, as Belinda Sinclair, another female magician in Chelsea, puts it, at age thirty without any prior knowledge or interest in show business. Though the lack of women in the industry is well known, research remains difficult to come by. A 2010 Pacific Standard article says women make up only five percent of magic clubs and performances. As one of the few women to hold this position of power – the magician is considered an authority figure, according to Solomon and various writing – Solomon has endured sexist and ageist remarks, particularly from amateurs. She recalls one man recently telling her, “Well you’ve got ten years before no one wants to see you on stage again.” While perusing magic shops, she’s often mistaken for someone’s mother. She tries to ignore the condescension and get on with her work.
magic  gender 
november 2017 by kme
Coeducation at university was – and is – no triumph of feminism | Aeon Ideas
Particularly in the US, elite institutions embarked on coeducation to shore up their applicant pools at a time when male students were making it plain that they wanted to go to school with women. Presidents such as Kingman Brewster Jr of Yale (1963-77) and Robert F Goheen of Princeton (1957-72) were forthright about their overriding interest: to enrol women students in order to recapture their hold on ‘the best boys’.
highered  feminism  gender  equality 
november 2016 by kme
The Fear of Having a Son - The New York Times
An informal Facebook survey she took yielded these results: “I wanted a girl mainly because I felt it was harder to be a boy in today’s society. If I have a boy I will embrace the challenge of raising a boy…who can learn the power of vulnerability even as male culture tries to make him see it as weakness. But, frankly, I hope that when I have a second child, it’ll be another girl.’” This was emblematic of a lot of the responses, which revealed that men felt more confident, or “better equipped,” co-parenting “a strong, confident daughter.”

Recently, I sent Macallah, now 5, to his room after he ignored my repeated requests to stop yelling and throwing his toys. More than even his dismissal, what bothered me was what many people refer to as “boy energy.” It’s a reactive, sometimes destructive, force that unnerved me even as a child. Then I heard the voice of my wife, Liz, in my head: “He only wants your attention. Boys don’t always know how to ask for what they want.”

I found Macallah in his room, repeating the same behavior. I took a deep breath.

“Were you upset because I wasn’t paying attention to you?” I asked. Head and eyes downcast, he nodded. I bent down and hugged him, then looked at him. “It’s important that you learn to tell Mama and me what you need — sometimes that means telling us what you’re feeling inside, understand?” He nodded. “You do it,” I said. “Tell me what you really wanted.”

He shrugged, still looking down. “You to pay attention to me,” he said.

He threw his arms around my waist, leaning his head into me. I didn’t need words to know what filled my young son: He felt wanted.


From the comments:
If my next child is a girl, to raise a strong daughter, no matter how amazing of a job I do and however tough she is, she will be paid less, sexualized at a young age, have to learn a life of playing defense, be held accountable for other people's behavior, have to work twice as hard to get half as far, and when she's a mom herself, will have two full time jobs (at home and work). Chances are, my son will have it easier. And frankly, so will I during adolescence.
masculinity  parenthood  gender  forthecomments 
october 2016 by kme
The Fear of Having a Son - The New York Times
An informal Facebook survey she took yielded these results: “I wanted a girl mainly because I felt it was harder to be a boy in today’s society. If I have a boy I will embrace the challenge of raising a boy…who can learn the power of vulnerability even as male culture tries to make him see it as weakness. But, frankly, I hope that when I have a second child, it’ll be another girl.’” This was emblematic of a lot of the responses, which revealed that men felt more confident, or “better equipped,” co-parenting “a strong, confident daughter.”

Recently, I sent Macallah, now 5, to his room after he ignored my repeated requests to stop yelling and throwing his toys. More than even his dismissal, what bothered me was what many people refer to as “boy energy.” It’s a reactive, sometimes destructive, force that unnerved me even as a child. Then I heard the voice of my wife, Liz, in my head: “He only wants your attention. Boys don’t always know how to ask for what they want.”

I found Macallah in his room, repeating the same behavior. I took a deep breath.

“Were you upset because I wasn’t paying attention to you?” I asked. Head and eyes downcast, he nodded. I bent down and hugged him, then looked at him. “It’s important that you learn to tell Mama and me what you need — sometimes that means telling us what you’re feeling inside, understand?” He nodded. “You do it,” I said. “Tell me what you really wanted.”

He shrugged, still looking down. “You to pay attention to me,” he said.

He threw his arms around my waist, leaning his head into me. I didn’t need words to know what filled my young son: He felt wanted.

I have a daughter and I dearly wish I had a son too, but I must admit that cultural messages make raising a daughter feel more optimistic. In educated America masculinity is viewed as toxic and pathological, and male sexuality is virtually criminalized. Turn on many TV programs and watch females putting males in their place over and over again, both mentally and physically, while to represent the opposite dynamic in media seems unthinkable. All complex life evolved as an interplay between masculine and feminine, and health has always appeared to be found in the balance. It is unwise to pretend that men did not build the human world which has empowered women to enjoy their newfound freedoms, or that physical courage, reason, and map reading skills are now obsolete.

"But this boy’s going to be raised to feel and express his vulnerability."

This is the major error of this essay and philosophy in general. Children (male or female) are not just the product of their upbringing. They can be guided; they can learn from example, and they can be taught to understand that actions have consequences. But you think you can raise your son to "feel vulnerability"? I'm skeptical. I think your son will feel how he feels, and this probably doesn't have much to do with your conscious teaching. Despite concerns about raising boys that have emerged over the last 30 years, there are hundreds of thousands of years of genetic programming in your son that tell him that yelling, and running around, and throwing things is a fine thing for a five year old boy to do sometimes.

You mention you're concerned that your son's rambunctiousness may be a sign he's not expressive enough of his vulnerabilities. Could be. There are others (myself included) that worry that their son's race may lead others to interpret that same rambunctiousness as a dangerous threat to be criminalized and violently resisted. Admittedly, this is a different problem, but a more urgent one.
masculinity  parenthood  gender 
october 2016 by kme
Australian students to be taught about 'male privilege' - BBC News
A guide for the Year 7 and 8 curriculum states: "Being born a male, you have advantages - such as being overly represented in the public sphere - and this will be true whether you personally approve or think you are entitled to this privilege."

It describes privilege as "automatic, unearned benefits bestowed upon dominant groups" based on "gender, sexuality, race or socio-economic class".

Year 11 and 12 students are introduced to the concept of "hegemonic masculinity" which "requires boys and men to be heterosexual, tough, athletic and emotionless, and encourages the control and dominance of men over women".
education  australia  gender 
october 2016 by kme
From Britney to Trump: How Pop Culture Tells Women to Shut Up - The Atlantic
The “common scold” of the 17th century is present, in other words, every time a woman of the 21st is punished for asserting herself in the public sphere: every time she—whether running for president or simply running her life—is dismissed for being too brash, and too ambitious, and too inconvenient, and above all too loud. As the journalist Sady Doyle argues in her fantastic debut book, Trainwreck: “A woman must be perfect, or not be anything at all, to encounter fame without being shamed or scarred.”
gender  womeninpower  discrimination  doublestandard  thepatriarchy  celebrity  meltdown 
september 2016 by kme
The Daily Show's Woman Problem
Overall, The Daily Show's environment was such that many women felt marginalized. "It was a place of just business," says one show veteran. "The business happened to be hilarious comedy, but you weren't allowed to enjoy it...Any sort of emotional vulnerability is like blood to a shark. And that is not great for women."
gender  comedy  television 
september 2016 by kme
Humans of New York
It’s really quite funny. I’ll go to these events and there will be men speaking before me, and they’ll be pounding the message, and screaming about how we need to win the election. And people will love it. And I want to do the same thing. Because I care about this stuff. But I’ve learned that I can’t be quite so passionate in my presentation. I love to wave my arms, but apparently that’s a little bit scary to people. And I can’t yell too much. It comes across as ‘too loud’ or ‘too shrill’ or ‘too this’ or ‘too that.’ Which is funny, because I’m always convinced that the people in the front row are loving it.”
gender  bias  leadership  femininity  doublestandards 
september 2016 by kme
Hillary Clinton’s charisma deficit is a common problem for female leaders — Quartz
Not being able to embrace an emotional voice—and thus, not being able to connect and inspire—has meant that women often put forth only fractured selves, stunted leaders. For all her qualifications, Clinton is dogged by accusations of being too stiff, too guarded, too inauthentic. Holman attributes this to the expectation that female leaders check every box and exhibit every leadership trait, while men can get away with checking just a few. (Notably, Weber’s definition of charisma includes an all-important “or.” Charisma can be based on exceptional personal qualities or extraordinary accomplishment, though women don’t seem to get that pass.)
gender  bias  inequality  leadership  politics 
september 2016 by kme
Hillary Clinton’s Candidacy Has Sparked a Sexist Backlash in the U.S. - The Atlantic [http://www.theatlantic.com/]
To understand this reaction, start with what social psychologists call “precarious manhood” theory. The theory posits that while womanhood is typically viewed as natural and permanent, manhood must be “earned and maintained.” Because it is won, it can also be lost. Scholars at the University of South Florida and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign reported that when asked how someone might lose his manhood, college students rattled off social failures like “losing a job.” When asked how someone might lose her womanhood, by contrast, they mostly came up with physical examples like “a sex-change operation” or “having a hysterectomy.”
gender  politics  bias  misogyny  manhood 
september 2016 by kme
The real reason why women drink — Quartz
That’s the summer I realize that everyone around me is tanked. But it also dawns on me that the women are super double tanked — that to be a modern, urbane woman means to be a serious drinker. This isn’t a new idea — just ask the Sex and the City girls (or the flappers). A woman with a single malt scotch is bold and discerning and might fire you from her life if you fuck with her. A woman with a PBR is a Cool Girl who will not be shamed for belching. A woman drinking MommyJuice wine is saying she’s more than the unpaid labor she gave birth to. The things women drink are signifiers for free time and self-care and conversation — you know, luxuries we can’t afford. How did you not see this before? I ask myself. You were too hammered, I answer back. That summer I see, though. I see that booze is the oil in our motors, the thing that keeps us purring when we should be making other kinds of noise.

Have I mentioned that it’s morning when this happens? On a weekday? This isn’t one of those nightclub farmer’s markets. And the women aren’t the kind of beleaguered, downtrodden creatures you imagine drinking to get through the day. They’re pretty cool chicks, the kind people ridicule for having First World Problems. Why do they need to drink?
Well, maybe because even cool chicks are still women. And there’s no easy way to be a woman, because, as you may have noticed, there’s no acceptable way to be a woman. And if there’s no acceptable way to be the thing you are, then maybe you drink a little. Or a lot.

I don’t say she’ll have to work around interruptions and invisibility and micro-aggressions and a scarcity of role models and a lifetime of her own conditioning. My job on this panel is to make this place sound good, so I leave some stuff out. Particularly the fact that I’m drinking at least one bottle of wine a night to dissolve the day off of me.

What’s a girl to do when a bunch of dudes have just told her, in front of an audience, that she’s wrong about what it’s like to be herself? I could talk to them, one by one, and tell them how it felt. I could tell the panel organizers this is why you never have just one of us up there. I could buy myself a superhero costume and devote the rest of my life to vengeance on mansplainers everywhere.

Do you remember the Enjoli perfume commercial from the 1970s? The chick who could bring home the bacon, fry it up in a pan, and never let you forget you’re a man?
I blame that bitch for a lot. For spreading the notion that women should have a career, keep house, and fuck their husbands, when the only sane thing to do is pick two and outsource the third. For making it seem glamorous. For suggesting it was going to be fun. And for the tagline she dragged around: “The 8-Hour Perfume for the 24-Hour Woman.” Just in case you thought you could get one fucking hour off the clock.

But knives and booze, yoga and booze, 13 mile runs and booze? What’s next to be liquored up: CPR training? Puppy ballet class? (Not really a thing, but someone should get on it.) Is there nothing so inherently absorbing or high-stakes or pleasurable that we won’t try to alter our natural response to it? Maybe women are so busy faking it — to be more like a man at work, more like a porn star in bed, more like 30 at 50 — that we don’t trust our natural responses anymore. Maybe all that wine is an Instagram filter for our own lives, so we don’t see how sallow and cracked they’ve become.
drinking  culture  alcohol  gender  mansplaining 
august 2016 by kme
America loves women like Hillary Clinton–as long as they’re not asking for a promotion — Quartz
If you find this hypothesis unlikely, there’s Ann Friedman’s explanation: Clinton makes people uncomfortable by succeeding too visibly. Clinton is trapped in “the catch-22 of female ambition,” Friedman writes: “To succeed, she needs to be liked, but to be liked, she needs to temper her success.”

Women often find self-promotion difficult even outside the realm of politics. For example, a 2011 study found that men are four times more likely to ask for raises than their female co-workers. Women are much more likely than men to under-estimate their abilities. When they apply for jobs, they often refuse to even submit a resume unless they’re certain they have 100% of the requisite qualifications. (The qualification threshold for men is only 60%. Think about that the next time you wonder why on Earth Donald Trump thinks he should be president–or, for that matter, when Bernie Sanders insists that his lack of foreign policy experience compared to Clinton’s doesn’t matter, because he has better “judgment.”)
gender  bias  politics  femaleambition  doublestandards  perspective 
august 2016 by kme
Health Benefits for Stay-at-Home Dads and Women With Careers - The Atlantic
Social identity theory suggests that, in men, breadwinning would come with better health—a sort of harmony with their understandings of themselves and the world’s. But the Connecticut researchers actually found that as their income increased relative to their wives’, men’s psychological well-being and health declined. The men’s mental and physical health (measured by self-assessment) were at their worst during years when they were their family’s sole breadwinner.
gender  homelife  income  masculinity  traditionalgenderroles 
august 2016 by kme
Identity Theft: The "Trans" Con
Men and women think differently. It’s a truism. One that virtually everyone on the planet is aware of. It has nothing to do with masculinity or femininity. Macho men, sensitive guys, flaming gay boys – they all share a male way of thinking. The femmiest princesses, the most driven businesswomen, the butchest lesbian bikers – they all think like females. And neither group really understands how the others think. What’s considered masculine and feminine changes from one culture to another. It’s determined by each culture. But male and female? That’s innate. That’s hardwired into our brains. And that’s where our minds – our selves – live. In our brains. It’s our brains that determine who we are. If someone loses a limb, they’re still the same person. If a person loses their sight or their hearing or their sense of smell, they’re the same person. But damage their brain? Change the brain and you change the personality. Change the brain and you change who a person is. You can change the way a person reacts to stimuli, but you can’t change their fundamental sense of self. If you do that, it’s not a change. It’s a destruction of the individual and its replacement with another individual.

I believe that male and female brains are wired differently. And that there are people who – for whatever reason, be it genetic tendency, natal hormones, or even birth experiences – are born with brains wired for a different sex than the rest of their bodies. I can’t prove it, but I expect that it will eventually be shown medically to be the case.

I’ve had people ask me why I don’t adopt the political positions of the "queer" community. The GLBT or LGBT or LBGTQ or TUVWXYZ folks who do the parades. After all, they point out, those people will give me unconditional acceptance. And while I can understand, intellectually, why people might change their convictions for the sake of a more comfortable community, I’m unable to grasp it in my gut. If you really have convictions, how can comfort or its lack change them?

It’s my convictions that require me to write this essay. I’ve been watching the "trans" insanity from the sidelines. The onslaught of the "accept us or you’re evil" crowd and the backlash of the "Ew! Cooties!" crowd. I’ve heard people ask – and it’s a reasonable question – how the whole trans thing has erupted over such a short period of time. I’ve read articles by people who actually started transitioning because they were more masculine or feminine than is usual for their sex, but who abandoned that ship before things went too far. I’m going to link to some of those at the end of this article.

Back in the mid-90s, when I transitioned, I called a local gay organization in hopes that they might be able to point me in the direction of some resources. A therapist. An endocrinologist. Other people in my situation. The public Internet was in its infancy, and there wasn’t much there. Their reaction was, shall we say, less than helpful. I found out quickly that the gay community, including the lesbian community, didn’t like transsexuals. There were two main reasons for this. One was that they suspected we were gays or lesbians who weren’t willing to accept being homosexual, with all the social penalties that came with it, and figured that by "switching sides", they could be socially heterosexual. Another was more fundamental. The idea of changing sex from one to the other reinforces the idea that there are, indeed, two sides. In the language of the left, it reinforces the "gender binary".

Over the past two decades, there has been an extreme shift in the GLB community. The embracing of "transgender" or "genderqueer" or any other challenge to the paradigm of male and female has become the "new civil rights movement." And the question is: why?

What’s the bottom line here? You don’t have to believe that I’m female. And you don’t have to accept the radical trans agenda. You should refrain from being a douchebag and treating someone badly because they’re gay, or because their gender expression looks odd to you. But if you’re gay or trans and you know that the way you look is going to make people feel uncomfortable, don’t you be a douche. Show some sensitivity for the rest of the world. The kind of sensitivity that you’d like for yourself.
transpeople  gender  sexuality  activism  dissentingopinion  dysmorphia  explained 
july 2016 by kme
The idea that gender is a spectrum is a new gender prison | Aeon Essays
Many people justifiably assume that the word ‘transgender’ is synonymous with ‘transsexual’, and means something like: having dysphoria and distress about your sexed body, and having a desire to alter that body to make it more closely resemble the body of the opposite sex. But according to the current terminology of gender identity politics, being transgender has nothing to do with a desire to change your sexed body. What it means to be transgender is that your innate gender identity does not match the gender you were assigned at birth. This might be the case even if you are perfectly happy and content in the body you possess. You are transgender simply if you identify as one gender, but socially have been perceived as another.
gender  queer  feminism  society  genderidentiy  genderexpression 
july 2016 by kme
It’s time to admit Hillary Clinton is an extraordinarily talented politician - Vox
Now Obama says that Clinton "had a tougher job throughout that primary than I did. She had to do everything that I had to do, except, like Ginger Rogers, backwards in heels." It's been clear since early in the primary that he is firmly in her corner, and his endorsement is believed to be imminent.
womeninpower  politics  gender  clinton 
june 2016 by kme
Why Isn't Better Education Giving Women More Power? - The Atlantic
The university system aside, I suspect there is another, deeply ingrained set of behaviors that also undermine women: the habits they pick up—or don’t pick up—in the dating world. Men learn early that to woo women, they must risk rejection and be persistent. Straight women, for their part, learn from their earliest years that they must wait to be courted. The professional world does not reward the second approach. No one is going to ask someone out professionally if she just makes herself attractive enough. I suspect this is why people who put together discussion panels and solicit op‑eds always tell me the same thing: it’s harder to get women to say yes than men. Well, duh. To be female in our culture is to be trained from puberty in the art of rebuffing—rebuffing gazes, comments, touches, propositions, and proposals.
gender  education  womenintech 
june 2016 by kme
The Glass Screen: Hillary Clinton, Tracy Flick, and the Reclaiming of Female 'Ambition' - The Atlantic
And for women candidates, in particular, the calculus becomes even more difficult, since the things campaigning requires—the assorted forms of swaggering—are particularly frowned upon when they’re exhibited by women. Clinton, doing the basic campaign-trail work the American electorate demands of its would-be executives, has been accused of yelling and bragging. (Last time around, in 2008, the simple act of talking led some pundits to dismiss her as “shrill.”)

In America, you prove your worthiness for power by proving your lack of desire for that power. If you are a woman, you have an added challenge: You must prove that you will use the power you want-but-don’t-want to act on behalf of everyone but yourself.

With the overall result that, despite all the depictions of female leaders on TV and in film, pop culture has yet to grapple, in a deep and realistic way, with the women who defy cultural conventions in order to star in political ones. It hasn’t yet considered the political implications of the discrepancy between notions of female ambition (which is often pathologized and mistrusted and feared) and its masculine counterpart (celebrated, rewarded, normalized).

With the overall result that, despite all the depictions of female leaders on TV and in film, pop culture has yet to grapple, in a deep and realistic way, with the women who defy cultural conventions in order to star in political ones. It hasn’t yet considered the political implications of the discrepancy between notions of female ambition (which is often pathologized and mistrusted and feared) and its masculine counterpart (celebrated, rewarded, normalized).
womeninpower  genderbias  gender  politics 
june 2016 by kme
Enforcing high heels in the office is the height of workplace sexism | Women in Leadership | The Guardian
We know how you dress is no longer a signifier of success or importance, Steve Jobs’ dedication to jeans and trainers ended that, so why do we still feel it’s necessary to dictate the type of shoes that women wear? Yes, dress codes might ask men to wear ties and not apply this rule to women but there’s one clear difference here: unless your office takes its influences from Fifty Shades of Grey, there is nothing particularly sexual about a tie. High heels on the other hand, they’re designed to sexualise women. They lengthen our legs, change the way we walk and, whether we intend it or not, make us more attractive to both sexes.

When you’re a working woman there can be advantages to heels, particularly if you’re the shortest person in a room filled with tall men who want to literally talk over your head. They can elevate you, force you to throw your shoulders back and lift your head up, they can make you feel powerful. But that power comes from choice, when I walk around the office in a pair of shoes that risk my ankles it is my decision, and there is power in the freedom to make that decision. For some reason I don’t believe that Portico wants its female employees to feel empowered by their shoes, if they did they wouldn’t have minded so much when one of them pointed out the company’s blatantly sexist policy. So why is it so wedded to this outdated dress code?

It’s not enough to have a professional, competent receptionist welcoming your guests, she also needs to be sexy. Because for some reason companies still seem to think that true success is coming through the door to a woman who is both beddable and biddable, the 1950s housewife brought into the office. And there’s nothing empowering about that, no matter what shoes you wear.
dresscodes  gender  uk  heels  business 
may 2016 by kme
Ways Men In Tech Are Unintentionally Sexist | this is not a pattern
Related: Referring to hardware (or cars, or whatever) by female names or pronouns. Yeah, okay, grand naval tradition and all that, but it’s still kind of weird. Can you not tell the difference between women and objects?
tech  culture  sexism  gender 
january 2016 by kme
Girls and Software | Linux Journal
Why does anyone, anywhere, think this will work? Start with a young woman who's already formed her identity. Dump her in a situation that operates on different social scripts than she's accustomed to, full of people talking about a subject she doesn't yet understand. Then tell her the community is hostile toward women and therefore doesn't have enough of them, all while showing her off like a prize poodle so you can feel good about recruiting a female. This is a recipe for failure.

I've also come to realize that I have an advantage that female newcomers don't: I was here before the sexism moral panic started. When a dozen guys decide to drink and hack in someone's hotel room, I get invited. They've known me for years, so I'm safe. New women, regardless of competence, don't get invited unless I'm along. That's a sexual harassment accusation waiting to happen, and no one will risk having 12 men alone with a single woman and booze. So the new ladies get left out.
gender  opensource  womenintech  sexism 
october 2015 by kme
Michael Kimmel: Why gender equality is good for everyone — men included | TED Talk | TED.com
There's another group, though, that actively resists gender equality, that sees gender equality as something that is detrimental to men. I was on a TV talk show opposite four white men. This is the beginning of the book I wrote, 'Angry White Men.' These were four angry white men who believed that they, white men in America, were the victims of reverse discrimination in the workplace. And they all told stories about how they were qualified for jobs, qualified for promotions, they didn't get them, they were really angry. And the reason I'm telling you this is I want you to hear the title of this particular show. It was a quote from one of the men, and the quote was, "A Black Woman Stole My Job." And they all told their stories, qualified for jobs, qualified for promotions, didn't get it, really angry. And then it was my turn to speak, and I said, "I have just one question for you guys, and it's about the title of the show, 'A Black Woman Stole My Job.' Actually, it's about one word in the title. I want to know about the word 'my.' Where did you get the idea it was your job? Why isn't the title of the show, 'A Black Woman Got the Job?' or 'A Black Woman Got A Job?'" Because without confronting men's sense of entitlement, I don't think we'll ever understand why so many men resist gender equality.
7:19
(Applause)
7:26
Look, we think this is a level playing field, so any policy that tilts it even a little bit, we think, "Oh my God, water's rushing uphill. It's reverse discrimination against us."
7:35
(Laughter)
7:36
So let me be very clear: white men in Europe and the United States are the beneficiaries of the single greatest affirmative action program in the history of the world. It is called "the history of the world."
gender  workplace  video 
september 2015 by kme
The Shut-In Economy — Matter — Medium
That’s the other side of this, the gender one. The errands being served up by the on-demand economy — cooking, cleaning, laundry, groceries, runs to the post office — all were all once, and in many places still are, the jobs of stay-at-home mothers. Even now, when women outnumber men in the formal workplace, they continue to bear the brunt of that invisible domestic work, often for many, many hours a week. So women — those who can afford it, at least — have the most to win from passing that load on to somebody else.
culture  internet  society  family  gender  household  commentary 
march 2015 by kme
Here Is The Male Version Of Power Girl's Boob Window (NSFW)
The size of his bulge needs to be way bigger to match Power Girls boobs.

It should look like he's smuggling Snuffaluffagus into JSA headquarters.
gender  comics  satire  forthecomments 
february 2015 by kme
Stephen Fry opens a window on to male depression – we must let boys cry | Ally Fogg | Comment is free | The Guardian
Reams of research papers have demonstrated how boys and girls are socialised differently, and their behaviour is interpreted differently from their first kicks in the womb onwards. Infant boys who display anger and aggression in response to stress or frustration are more likely than girls to be indulged or rewarded by parents and caregivers; when the response is sadness and anxiety, the reactions by gender tend to be reversed. This helps to set in place a lifelong pattern in which boys and men are more likely to externalise anger and distress into violence and antisocial behaviour and are less likely to seek help with personal problems of all sorts. They end up more likely to take drastic, solitary steps to self-manage or self-medicate their problems.
gender 
december 2014 by kme
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