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display phone number doximity - Google Search
https://www.google.com/search?q=display+phone+number+doximity&oq=display+phone+number+doxim&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j33.11439j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 ;;;
tags: display phone number doximity - Google Search use app to call patients from your cell phone but make it look like you are calling from your office phone ;;;
display  phone  number  doximity  -  Google  Search  use  app  to  call  patients  from  your  cell  but  make  it  look  like  you  are  calling  office 
2 days ago by neerajsinghvns
How to be memorable in social settings needsEditing
How to be memorable in social settings
https://www.theladders.com/career-advice/how-to-be-memorable-in-social-settings
View the article + more on Flipboard.
https://flip.it/w1YyGW
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and  10  Photo  Storage  Sharing  Sites  The  image  picture  pic  Site  Best  BUSINESS  INSIDER:  Instagram  influencer  shares  media  kit_  brand  pitch:  100_000  followers  needsEditing  social  marketing  How  to  Design  a  Beautiful  Mobile  Optimized  Website  While  Avoiding  Another  Monthly  Subscription  Fee  CNBC:  Amazon  will  grow  25%  every  year  'like  clockwork_'  Chamath  Palihapitiya  says  amzn  retirement  investment  Set  Up  Use  Apple's  Instant  Notes  Feature  on  iPhone  iPad  apple  howTo  This  Is  Much  Quicker  Electric  VW  I.D.  R  Than  McLaren  720S  sonu  Your  Guide  Tesla  Extended  Warranty  Options  20  Ridiculous  Phrases  You  Should  Immediately  Stop  Saying  at  Work  words  corporate  speak  CNBC  :  Hiring  CEO  4  'ballsy  questions  '  I  wish  more  people  asked  during  job  interviews  jobSearch  jobInterview  TTD  Font  Apps  for  |  Digital  Trends  fonts  web  Lost  My  Faith  in  America  USA  Australia  admiration  of  by  an  Australian  I've  been  interviewing  years—and  these  are  3  resume  examples_  based  experience  level  sample  samples  INSIDER  that  transforming  jobs  HR  team 
26 days ago by neerajsinghvns
CNN BUSINESS : The strange reason Tesla , Beyond Meat and Peloton are soaring needsEditing
Beyond Meat, Tesla and many more of this year's hottest stocks all have something in common. Investors love to hate them and are making big bets that they will soon fall. But stocks that are being heavily shorted could squeeze their way higher.
Read in CNN Business: https://apple.news/AqNTLNMpKQV6hMgYMGZ6ArA
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CNN  BUSINESS  :  The  strange  reason  Tesla  BeyondMeat  Beyond  Meat  and  Peloton  are  soaring  needsEditing 
8 weeks ago by neerajsinghvns
What to Do If You Are Deferred | HuffPost
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/what-to-do-if-you-are-def_b_6323618 ;;;
tags: What to Do If You Are Deferred | HuffPost || university college admission deferral what to do whatToDo ;;;
What  to  Do  If  You  Are  Deferred  |  HuffPost  ||  university  college  admission  deferral  whatToDo 
10 weeks ago by neerajsinghvns
Why Warren Buffett says index funds are the best investment
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/01/03/why-warren-buffett-says-index-funds-are-the-best-investment.html ;;;
tags: Why Warren Buffett says index funds are the best investment VFIAX Vanguard SP500 ;;;
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In 2007, legendary investor Warren Buffett made a $1 million bet against Protégé Partners that hedge funds wouldn’t outperform an S&P index fund, and he won.

Buffett’s choice fund, the Vanguard 500 Index Fund Admiral Shares, returned 7.1 percent compounded annually, while the basket of hedge funds his competitor chose returned an average of only 2.2 percent, the Wall Street Journal reports.
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Why  Warren  Buffett  says  index  funds  are  the  best  investment  VFIAX  Vanguard  SP500 
december 2019 by neerajsinghvns
Business Insider: 6 carmakers that are betting electric scooters and bikes — not cars — are the future of city transportation
Business Insider
Volkswagen's line of mobility concepts. Carmakers are investing in electric portable mobility transportation by creating either concepts or full-blown new products, including e-bikes and e-scooters, at an increasing pace. While concept micro-mobility ideas like Volkswagen's scooters have an uncertain path to production, others, such as Peugeot, already sell a full line of products - and have for years. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Carmakers are increasingly looking towards Read the full story
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Business  Insider  :  6  carmakers  car  company  companies  that  are  betting  electric  scooter  scooters  and  bike  bikes    not  cars  the  future  of  city  transportation  ev 
august 2019 by neerajsinghvns
How to go from Average to SMART
How are the ISEE and SSAT structured?
"click here" -------takes a person to "differences" page.
"click here" should take a person to "similarities" & "differences" page.
mistake  HTGFATS  How  are  the  ISEE  and  SSAT  structured 
june 2019 by neerajsinghvns
The Motley Fool : Driverless self driving car Cars Are Going to Disrupt the Airline Industry
The Motley Fool
Skipping the hassle of flying – and the different headache of driving – gives self-driving cars a leg up when people are choosing how to travel. Read the full story
Shared from Apple News
The  Motley  Fool  :  Driverless  self  driving  car  Cars  Are  Going  to  Disrupt  Airline  Industry  komal  neha  sonu  neeraj 
june 2019 by neerajsinghvns
CNN: Virtual kidnappings are rattling families across the US
CNN
"I have your son and I'm going to kill him / her," a voice on the other side of the phone said. Read the full story
Shared from Apple News
CNN  :  Virtual  kidnap  kidnapping  kidnappings  are  rattling  family  families  across  the  US  USA  |  Komal  Neha  Sonu  &  Neeraj 
june 2019 by neerajsinghvns
SAT, SSAT, ACT expect you to solve questions like this in less than 90 seconds. "Click here" to see the solution.
https://averagetosmart.com/sat-pt01-ex19-triangles-cosine.php ;;;
https://www.mathopenref.com/similartriangles.html ;;;
https://www.varsitytutors.com/hotmath/hotmath_help/topics/similar-triangles ;;; similar vs congruent
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tags: mistake HTGFATS explain what are similar triangles and congruent helpfulTopics helpful topics ;;;

explain similarities and differences, with examples, between similar and congruent triangles.
mistake  HTGFATS  explain  what  are  similar  triangles  and  congruent  helpfulTopics  helpful  topics 
june 2019 by neerajsinghvns
Tested: Should You Unplug Chargers When You’re Not Using Them?
https://www.howtogeek.com/231886/tested-should-you-unplug-chargers-when-youre-not-using-them/ ;;;
tags: how much energy is consumed by cell mobile phone charger chargers if they are left plugged in kill-a-watt kill a watt ;;;
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if you leave your cell phone charger plugged in, all year long, it costs about 5 and a half cents.
how  much  energy  is  consumed  by  cell  mobile  phone  charger  chargers  if  they  are  left  plugged  in  kill-a-watt  kill  a  watt 
april 2019 by neerajsinghvns
People that use incognito mode for anything but porn, what are you doing? : AskReddit
https://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/comments/4y16sg/people_that_use_incognito_mode_for_anything_but/ ;;;
tags: People that use incognito mode for anything but porn what are you doing ? : AskReddit reddit airline booking private internet browse browsing ;;;
People  that  use  incognito  mode  for  anything  but  porn  what  are  you  doing  ?  :  AskReddit  reddit  airline  booking  private  internet  browse  browsing 
february 2019 by neerajsinghvns
The Bailouts For The Rich Are Why America Is So Screwed Right Now | Zero Hedge
The Bailouts For The Rich Are Why America Is So Screwed Right Now
Authored by Matt Stoller via Vice.com,
Did they prevent a full-scale collapse? Yes. Was it necessary to do it the way we did? Not at all.
These guys got off pretty easy. (Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)
In 1948, the architect of the post-war American suburb, William Levitt, explained the point of the housing finance system. "No man who owns his own house and lot can be a Communist," he said. "He has too much to do."
It’s worth reflecting on this quote on the ten-year anniversary of the financial crisis, because it speaks to how the architects of the bailouts shaped our culture. Tim Geithner, Ben Bernanke, and Hank Paulson, the three key men in charge, basically argue that the bailouts they executed between 2007 and 2009 were unfair, but necessary to preserve stability. It’s time to ask, though: just what stability did they preserve?
These three men paint the financial crisis largely as a technical one. But let’s not get lost in the fancy terms they use, like “normalization of credit flows," in discussing what happened and why. The excessively wonky tone is intentional - it's intended to hide the politics of what happened. So let’s look at what the bailouts actually were, in normal human language.
The official response to the financial crisis ended a 75-year-old American policy of pursuing broad homeownership as a social goal. Since at least Franklin Delano Roosevelt, American leaders had deliberately organized the financial system to put more people in their own homes. In 2011, the Obama administration changed this policy, pushing renting over owning. The CEO of Bank of America, Brian Moynihan, echoed this view shortly thereafter. There are many reasons for the change, and not all of them were bad. But what’s important to understand is that the financial crisis was a full-scale assault on the longstanding social contract linking Americans with the financial system through their house.
The way Geithner orchestrated this was through a two-tiered series of policy choices. During the crisis, everyone needed money from the government, but Geithner offered money to the big guy, and not the little guy.
First, he found mechanisms, all of them very technical—and well-reported in Adam Tooze’s new book Crashed—to throw unlimited amounts of credit at institutions controlled by financial executives in the United States and Europe. (Eric Holder, meanwhile, also de facto granted legal amnesty to executives for possible securities fraud associated with the crisis.)
Second, Geithner chose to deny money and credit to the middle class in the midst of a foreclosure crisis. The Obama administration supported this by neutering laws against illegal foreclosures.
The response to the financial crisis was about reorganizing property rights. If you were close to power, you enjoyed unlimited rights and no responsibilities, and if you were far from power, you got screwed. This shaped the world into what it is today. As Levitt pointed out, when people have no stake in the system, they get radical.
Did this prevent a full-scale collapse? Yes. Was it necessary to do it the way we did? Not at all.
Geithner, Bernanke, and Paulson like to pretend that bank bailouts are inherently unpopular—that they were wise stewards resisting toxic (populist) political headwinds. But it’s not that simple. Unfair bank bailouts are unpopular, but reasonable ones are not. For an alternative, look at how a previous generation of Democrats handled a similar, though much more serious, crisis.
In 1933, when FDR took power, global banking was essentially non-functional. Bankers had committed widespread fraud on top of a rickety and poorly structured financial system. Herbert Hoover, who organized an initial bailout by establishing what was known as the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, was widely mocked for secretly sending money to Republican bankers rather than ordinary people. The new administration realized that trust in the system was essential.
One of the first things Roosevelt did, even before he took office, was to embarrass powerful financiers. He did this by encouraging the Senate Banking Committee to continue its probe, under investigator Ferdinand Pecora, of the most powerful institutions on Wall Street, which were National City (now Citibank) and JP Morgan. Pecora exposed these institutions as nests of corruption. The Senate Banking Committee made public Morgan’s "preferred list," which was the group of powerful and famous people who essentially got bribes from Morgan. It included the most important men in the country, like former Republican President Calvin Coolidge, a Supreme Court Justice, important CEOs and military leaders, and important Democrats, too.
Roosevelt also ordered his attorney general "vigorously to prosecute any violations of the law" that emerged from the investigations. New Dealers felt that "if the people become convinced that the big violators are to be punished it will be helpful in restoring confidence." The DOJ indicted National City’s Charles Mitchell for tax evasion. This was part of a series of aggressive attacks on the old order of corrupt political and economic elites. The administration pursued these cases, often losing the criminal complaints but continuing with civil charges. This bought the Democrats the trust of the public.
When Roosevelt engaged in his own broad series of bank bailouts, the people rewarded his party with overwhelming gains in the midterm elections of 1934 and a resounding re-election in 1936. Along with an assertive populist Congress, the new administration used the bailout money in the RFC to implement mass foreclosure-mitigation programs, create deposit insurance, and put millions of people to work. He sought to save not the bankers but the savings of the people themselves.
Democrats did more than save the economy - they also restructured it along democratic lines. They passed laws to break up banks, the emerging airline industry, and electric utilities. The administration engaged in an aggressive antitrust campaign against industrial monopolists. And Roosevelt restructured the Federal Reserve so that the central bank was not "independent" but set interest rates entirely subservient to the wishes of elected officials.
In 1938, Franklin Delano Roosevelt offered his view on what causes democracies to fail.
"History proves that dictatorships do not grow out of strong and successful governments," he said, "but out of weak and helpless ones."
Did the bailouts of ten years ago work? It’s a good question. I don’t see a strong and vibrant democracy in America right now. Do you?
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The  Bailouts  For  The  Rich  Are  Why  America  Is  So  Screwed  Right  Now  needsEditing  2007  2008  2009  economy  depression  questionable 
october 2018 by neerajsinghvns
Warren Buffett's rule for investing during the financial crisis
This was Warren Buffett's 'simple rule' for investing during the financial crisis — and you can still use it today
Ali Montag | @Ali_Montag
10:27 AM ET Fri, 14 Sept 2018
In the fall of 2008, global markets were failing. Lehman Brothers, an investment bank with $600 billion in assets, filed for bankruptcy protection on Sept. 15 of that year, an inflection point in the economic slowdown that brought unemployment rates as high as 10 percent.
Two weeks later, during a single day on Sept. 29, the U.S. stock market lost $1.2 trillion in value as the Dow dropped 778 points, nearly 7 percent.
"You just felt like the world was unraveling," a senior equity trader named Ryan Larson told The New York Times that day. "People started to sell and they sold hard. It didn't matter what you had — you sold."
But there was one big investor who had a different outlook: Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett.
In fact, Buffett was buying.
"I've been buying American stocks," Buffett wrote in a an opinion piece for The New York Times on Oct. 16, 2008. Berkshire Hathaway also made big investments during the crisis, backing General Electric and Goldman Sachs.
Buffett understood the severity of the crisis; he told CNBC that year it was like an "economic Pearl Harbor." So why was he buying stocks that were rapidly falling in price when everyone else was socking cash under their pillow?
"A simple rule dictates my buying: Be fearful when others are greedy, and be greedy when others are fearful," Buffett wrote in the Times.
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In his view, the long-term value of innovative American business would continue to grow, despite the short term pain of the crisis. Buffett warned against investing in "highly leveraged entities, or businesses in weak competitive positions," but urged readers to see that the downturn provided an opportunity to buy strong companies at low prices.
"In short, bad news is an investor's best friend. It lets you buy a slice of America's future at a marked-down price," Buffett explained in the op-ed. "Fears regarding the long-term prosperity of the nation's many sound companies make no sense. These businesses will indeed suffer earnings hiccups, as they always have. But most major companies will be setting new profit records 5, 10 and 20 years from now."
That prediction turned out to be correct: In the 10 years since the fall of Lehman Brothers, the S&P 500 has increased by 130 percent. Companies like Apple and Amazon have soared to new heights, hitting trillion dollar valuations.
If you invested $1,000 in Apple in early August 2008, it would have been worth more than $9,222.50 as of August 2, 2018, or over nine times as much, including price appreciation and excluding dividends, according to CNBC calculations.
Buffett's strategy wasn't perfect — he admits his timing was a bit off on his October call to buy, as markets continued to plunge in 2009. "It was right on a long term basis," Buffett told CNBC, "but it was way off for four or five months at least."
Of course, it's human nature to want to make investments when markets are going up, Buffett said Monday in an interview for CNBC's documentary "Crisis on Wall Street: The Week That Shook the World."
"People start being interested in something because it's going up, not because they understand it or anything else," Buffett said. "The guy next door, who they know is dumber than they are, is getting rich and they aren't."
But instead of acting on emotional instincts, Buffett's advice is to follow that simple rule.
"Though markets are generally rational, they occasionally do crazy things," Buffett wrote in his2018 shareholder letter. "Seizing the opportunities then offered does not require great intelligence, a degree in economics or a familiarity with Wall Street jargon such as alpha and beta.
"What investors then need instead is an ability to both disregard mob fears or enthusiasms and to focus on a few simple fundamentals. A willingness to look unimaginative for a sustained period — or even to look foolish — is also essential."
Don't miss: An Omaha waitress served Warren Buffett for 10 years—here's what she learned from him
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"  A  simple  rule  dictates  my  buying:  Be  fearful  when  others  are  greedy  _  and  _"  Warren  Buffett  wrote  in  the  Times 
september 2018 by neerajsinghvns
These are first 7 Alexa skills you should enable
https://www.cnet.com/how-to/the-first-alexa-skills-you-should-enable/
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If  it  is  something  urgent_  after  you  send  me  the  details  by  email_  please  contact  text  These  are  first  7  Amazon  AMZN  Alexa  skills  should  enable  needsEditing 
august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
These 9 Dividend Stocks Are About to Soar — Thanks to Donald Trump
These 9 Dividend Stocks Are About to Soar — Thanks to Donald Trump
August 13, 2018, 12:26 PM EDT
There’s a lot uncertainty in today’s market, but one thing is guaranteed. It’s as sure as the sun rising again tomorrow … The new tax reform law is about to cause an avalanche of money to rush into a very specific kind of investment in the weeks and months ahead — dividends.
As you probably know, the new tax law slashed the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%.
According to Forbes, the corporate tax cut will save U.S. corporations $600 billion in taxes over the next decade. That’s $600 billion not going to Uncle Sam that companies will now put to use elsewhere.
InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips
That’s a lot of money, but it’s not even the biggest piece of the big tax reform cash avalanche that’s coming.
According to the Citizens for Tax Justice, the total amount currently being stashed overseas by Fortune 500 companies in order to avoid paying U.S. corporate taxes tops $2.6 TRILLION!
Just look at some of the names on this chart … Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL), Coca-Cola (NYSE:KO), Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN), General Electric (NYSE:GE), Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT), Gilead (NASDAQ:GILD), Intel (NASDAQ:INTC) … we’re talking about big, blue-chip companies hiding billions overseas. But the new tax law holiday lets companies bring back that cash at a 15.5% tax rate.
With $2.6 trillion sitting overseas, that’s potentially a $400 billion windfall for Uncle Sam …
And a more than $2 TRILLION bonanza for investors as companies put all that repatriated cash to work.
So where will it go?
Well, politicians and the media will tell you that bringing this money back will help fuel investment and create jobs.
But the pundits and the politicians will be wrong (yet again).
How You Can Grab Your Share of the $2.6 Trillion Tax Cut Bonanza
See, the tax holiday isn’t a new concept.
Every few years, Washington thinks it would be a great idea to allow this money back in at a lower rate to spur growth and increase wages.
In 2004, after President Bush delivered big tax cuts, he and Congress created a tax holiday.
Companies — many of the same ones sitting on big overseas profits today — were allowed to bring that cash back at an effective tax rate of only 3.7%. It spurred companies to bring $362 billion back to the U.S …
BUT almost none of it went to American jobs, wages, R&D or infrastructure.
Instead, according to studies by the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Wharton School of Business, this money was used to significantly increase payments to shareholders in the form of dividends and buybacks.
The studies proved that the increase in repatriated profits matched the increase in dividends and buybacks almost dollar for dollar.
And despite Washington’s best intentions, that’s exactly what will happen this time around, too.
Sure, some of that $2 trillion of corporate cash will go to workers.
Companies like American Airlines, Comcast, Bank of America and Disney have announced one-time bonuses for some workers. Walmart and Wells Fargo have announced they are raising their minimum wage to $15 an hour.
These announcements are great PR for these companies. And it’s a smart way to get on President Trump and congressional Republicans’ good side by giving them “proof” that their tax cuts are helping every day Americans.
But the reality is that this is small potatoes. The bonuses and wage increases announced only impact about 3.5 million of more than 125 million U.S. workers.
And the amount of money corporations will spend on wage increases and bonuses account for a drop in the bucket of total tax savings.
According to a report by Morgan Stanley, only 13% of companies’ tax savings will go to workers.
Where will the rest go?
A whopping 43% will go to stock buybacks and increasing dividends.
Bloomberg says that closer to 60% is going to buybacks and dividends. That’s still $1.5 TRILLION about to flood into dividends and stock buybacks.
That means this will be the largest investor windfall in history.
Before the ink was even dry on the new tax law in December, companies announced a slew of new stock buybacks …
Boeing announced an $18 BILLION buyback. Home Depot (NYSE:HD) committed to $15 billion. Honeywell (NYSE:HON) authorized another $8 billion for share buybacks. Bank of America (NYSE:BAC) said it will buy an additional $5 billion of its own stock.
MasterCard (NYSE:MA) $4 billion. United Airlines (NYSE:UAL), $3 billion.
Then right out of the gates in January another 61 companies announced $88 billion more in buybacks.
Wells Fargo (NYSE:WFC) announced a giant $22.6 BILLION share buyback plan.
Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN), $10 billion.
Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOG, NASDAQ:GOOGL) $8.6 billion.
Visa (NYSE:V), $7.5 billion.
Ebay (NASDAQ:EBAY), $6 billion
Lowes (NYSE:LOW), $5 billion …
In February, Cisco (NASDAQ:CSCO) announced a massive $25 million buyback plan. Applied Materials jumped in to the tune of $6 billion.
In May, American companies announced a record $201 billion in stock buybacks and cash takeovers.
Apple accounted for half of that, announcing that it would buy back $100 million in stock.
Micron Technology (NASDAQ:MU) announced a $10 billion buyback and Qualcomm’s (NASDAQ:QCOM) $8.8 billion.
I could go on and on and on.
We are looking at the biggest buyback announcements ever recorded so early in the year.
And this massive spending spree is likely just the start. JP Morgan forecasts an $800 billion buyback boom thanks to tax reform.
Buybacks are pouring $4.8 billion a DAY into certain stocks.
And that number will grow in the weeks ahead. Here’s why these buybacks matter …
When a company buys back its own shares, it reduces the number of shares in the market.
That’s good for shareholders for several reasons.
First, no matter what else happens in the market, buyback programs also mean these stocks have a guaranteed flow of buying pressure as they snap up shares of their own stock.
And companies love to buy their shares when they are cheap. So these stocks can see an influx of buying anytime their stock is down, which acts as a floor under the stock price.
Second, reducing the number of shares available means the earnings per share goes up.
AND the P/E ratio (price-to-earnings) goes down.
Both of those things make the stock more attractive to investors.
So new investors pour more money into the stocks, sending the share price higher.
In addition to pouring their tax savings into stock buybacks, companies plan to return a big chunk of their tax savings and cash stash to shareholders through dividends.
Since the tax bill became law, a slew of companies have announced they were raising their dividends.
Constellation Brands (NYSE:STZ) announced a 42% dividend hike.
Boeing (NYSE:BA) announced a 20% dividend hike.
MasterCard raised its dividend 25%.
First Horizon (NYSE:FHN) raised its dividend 33%.
Sabine Royalty Trust (NYSE:SBR) jacked its payment 26%
Meridian Bancorp Inc. (NASDAQ:EBSB) a 25% increase.
Yum Brands (NYSE:YUM) a 20% increase.
And Toll Brothers (NYSE:TOL) and AbbVie (NYSE:ABBV) both hiked 35%.
Dividend increases for the first quarter came in at a whopping $19.9 billion. That’s more than double the same time last year.
Here’s why these dividend increases matter …
Obviously, anyone who owns these stocks will see bigger dividend checks.
And not only will shareholders be rewarded with more income … higher dividends will make select dividend stocks even more attractive, causing more investors to pour in, driving these stock prices even higher.
But there’s another reason we want to buy stocks that are increasing their dividends …
Over the last 30+ years, there is one type of stock that has beaten all others, in good markets and in bad …
Stocks that raise their dividends.
These “dividend growers” have outperformed non-dividend paying stocks by a huge margin.
As you can see from the chart below, a $10,000 investment in non-dividend paying stocks in 1972 would be worth just $30,136 now.
But that same $10,000 in stocks that are increasing their dividend would be worth a whopping $630,024.
That’s an extra $600,000 in your nest egg by investing in dividend growers.
A rising dividend alone isn’t enough to make a stock a good buy.
But I’ve carefully selected nine stocks that are not only increasing their dividend, but also sport INCREDIBLE fundamentals like rising cash flows and solid earnings growth.
Stocks like:
Those are just a few of the stocks I’ve hand-picked for readers of my Growth Investor research service.
You can get their names and my full analysis on each one in my new report, 9 Rising Superstars: A-Rated Stocks with Growing Dividends.
There is a massive, unstoppable flood of money about to pour into the market. You want to own the stocks that will attract the lion’s share of that money.
I’m very confident this is one of the biggest money-making opportunities you’ll see in years. That’s why I’ve produced an entire online presentation on it. You can view this presentation, learn more about this opportunity, and learn how to access my list of “super elite” dividend paying stocks by clicking right here.
Regards,
Louis Navellier
Compare Brokers
The post These 9 Dividend Stocks Are About to Soar — Thanks to Donald Trump appeared first on InvestorPlace.
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These  9  Dividend  Stocks  Are  About  to  Soar    Thanks  Donald  Trump  ||  needsEditing  companies  stashing  money  overseas 
august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
These 5 tech stocks are in a dot-com-like bubble (and they aren’t all FAANGs) - MarketWatch
These 5 tech stocks are in a dot-com-like bubble (and they aren’t all FAANGs)
Getty Images
Spot the micro bubbles.
Although the overall stock market looks reasonably valued, there are pockets of extraordinary risk where stocks with 2000-bubble-like valuations lurk.
Specifically, there is a “micro bubble” in certain tech stocks, where valuations reflect expectations for future cash flows that would require unrealistically high margins, growth, and market share. These expectations might not be so “bubbly” if not for the fact that the current margins and cash flows of these companies have trended at very low or negative levels for years.
5 tech stocks in a micro bubble
Figure 1 lists the five tech stocks we put in our first micro bubble. They share a few key characteristics:
• Low or negative return on invested capital (ROIC) and free cash flow
• Unrealistically high valuations: all 10 companies either have negative economic book values, or they have a PEBV above 20
• Expectations that they achieve heretofore unseen dominant market shares
These are five of the largest micro-bubble companies. Briefly, here’s what makes each of these companies part of the micro-bubble.
Amazon
Fun fact: Amazon’s AMZN, +0.20% $885 billion market cap is higher than Walmart WMT, +0.45% Home Depot HD, +0.69% Oracle ORCL, -0.39% and Disney DIS, +0.53% combined. Investors are betting that Amazon can grow to dominate multiple industries while earning significantly higher margins than it does now.
Amazon has finally shown an ability to earn a profit, but it still must grow net operating profit after tax (NOPAT) by 30% compounded annually for 19 years to justify its current valuation. See the math behind this dynamic DCF scenario. For comparison, only six companies in the S&P 500 SPX, +0.28% managed to grow NOPAT by 30% compounded annually for just the past 10 years. Maintaining that growth rate for nearly double that time frame would be an extraordinary feat.
Amazon prefers to point investors to free cash flow, but its reported free cash flow numbers are an illusion. In reality, the company continues to experience significant cash outflows.
Investors who focus on understanding true cash flow and fundamentals know the disconnect between actual cash flow and the market’s expectations for future cash flows borders on the absurd.
Netflix
Netflix NFLX, +0.16% has become one of the leading creators of original content, but it’s done so with an unsustainable cost structure. As this excellent video from The Ringer explains, Netflix earns an accounting profit, but only because its reported content costs understate its actual content spending by about 50%. The company continues to lose billions of dollars a year and grows increasingly dependent on the high-yield debt market.
Felix Salmon of Slate recently published a piece titled “Netflix Can Either Become the Dominant Media Monopoly of the 21st Century or Go Bust.” The market values Netflix as if it will be that dominant monopoly when, frankly, there’s a very good chance it goes bust. Risk/reward for this stock is so bad that no investor with any respect for fundamentals can own this stock in good conscience.
Salesforce.com
Salesforce CRM, +1.21% has racked up losses for years while pursuing growth at any cost. The theory behind this strategy is that the company will eventually be able to cut back heavily on its marketing and R&D costs while maintaining its recurring revenue stream.
Even if this strategy does work, which is far from certain, the company is currently valued at 10 times revenue, or double the valuation of Oracle. This hasn’t dissuaded bulls, as Salesforce generates classic tech bubble-style headlines like “Ignore Salesforce’s Valuation.” In other words, they want investors to ignore fundamentals.
Tesla
Tesla TSLA, -1.09% currently has a higher market cap than GM GM, -0.05% despite selling about 1% as many cars in 2017. What’s more, GM is already ahead of Tesla in self-driving technology and rapidly catching up when it comes to electric vehicle production.
Elon Musk keeps promising that Tesla will revolutionize the auto industry, but so far Tesla hasn’t shown an ability to navigate the manufacturing logistics that the established auto makers figured out decades ago. The company’s valuation is blind to fundamentals and seems entirely focused on the cult of personality that has built up around Musk.
Read: Tesla confirms intention to go private, sending stock up 11%
Spotify
Spotify Technology SPOT, -0.24% wants to disrupt the music industry, but so far it remains beholden to the Big Three record labels that own 85% of the music streamed on its platform. The market thinks of Spotify as a trendy tech company, but as we wrote in our report on the stock, the economics of its business are more similar to the movie theater industry.
Spotify’s leverage against the record labels is further weakened by the rapid growth of competitors like Apple Music AAPL, -0.08% It’s hard to see how Spotify can justify the growth expectations implied by its valuation unless it could pull off the unlikely feat of taking over ownership of its content from the labels while holding off competition from other streaming services (all without having to overspend like Netflix has).
Again, we see a company where the valuation reflects the best-case scenario with little to no tether to fundamentals.
How to bet against the micro bubble
Investors that want to bet against these micro-bubble stocks can short them directly, but that can be expensive and risky for these momentum-driven companies. As the saying goes, the market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent.
Another way to profit from the busting of this micro bubble is to invest in the incumbents from which these companies must take major chunks of market share. When these micro-bubble stocks fall back to earth, a great deal of capital should be reallocated to the incumbents.
Macro bubbles vs. micro bubbles
Today’s market has some micro bubbles, or smaller groups of overhyped stocks trading at ridiculous valuations.That makes it very different from the tech bubble, which was a macro bubble, a marketwide phenomenon that distorted the valuation of the entire market.
A few new features are shaping the market now and explain why today’s bubbles are unlikely to spread to the entire market, at least for the foreseeable future:
• Politicians and policy makers are focused on preventing macro market crashes. Today’s politicians and policy makers are heavily shaped by both the housing bubble of the mid-2000s and the tech bubble of the late 1990s. They will likely do everything in their power to prevent recurrence of such cataclysmic events on their watch.
• Rising influence of noise traders. Noise traders, who make investment decisions based on noise and have no regard for fundamentals, are an increasingly influential force in today’s market. Roughly a quarter of all U.S. adults with internet access are retail online traders. That’s around 50 million investors who don’t have professional trading (much less investing) experience and might be more susceptible to buying into “story” stocks without understanding the fundamentals. There’s power in those numbers.
• Overhyping “transformative” technology. The splintering of online media has led journalists to overhype nearly every new technology and trend in a relentless competition for clicks. For example, despite the “Retail Apocalypse” narrative, brick-and-mortar sales still account for 90% of retail sales, and Walmart earned nearly three times more revenue than Amazon last year. In reality, very few new technologies are as transformative as we like to imagine.
• Value transfer vs. value creation. Too many investors overestimate the value-creation opportunities for new technologies. Even when technologies are transformative, predicting who will reap the benefits of these technologies is difficult. Often, most of the value accrues to end users/consumers and not corporations. When it does accrue to a company, it’s usually at the expense of another company. During the tech bubble, bulls believed the internet would make our economy radically more productive and allow the GDP growth rate of around 5% in the late 90’s to persist for many years. When this utopian future failed to materialize, the market collapsed. By contrast, today’s micro-bubble companies compete against firmly established incumbents from which they must take large chunks of market share to survive. Instead of adding value, these companies aim to take value from existing players. Even if they succeed, we think much of that value will eventually pass to consumers.
This last point is key. In 1999, investors gave Microsoft MSFT, -0.10% its absurdly high valuation because they believed its software would create enormous amounts of value and growth for thousands of other companies. On the other hand, Tesla’s sky-high valuation implies it will take market share away from General Motors and Ford F, +0.50% which decreases the valuation of those companies.
These modern-day micro bubbles reflect the zero-sum nature of today’s crowded and more mature competitive landscapes.
Why we’re not in a macro bubble
Figure 2 sums up the difference between the tech bubble and today’s market pretty clearly. It shows the price to economic book value (PEBV) of the largest 1,000 U.S. stocks by market cap going back to 2000. PEBV compares the current valuation of a company compared to the zero-growth value of its cash flows, i.e. NOPAT, so a higher PEBV means the market expects more future cash flow growth.
While the market’s PEBV has more than doubled since 2012, from 0.7 to 1.5, it’s nowhere close to its tech bubble level of 5.7.
There are definitely some outrageously valued companies out there, but those high valuations … [more]
If  it  is  something  urgent_  after  you  send  me  the  details  by  email_  please  contact  text.  These  5  tech  stocks  are  in  a  dot-com-like  bubble  (and  they  aren’t  all  FAANGs)  -  MarketWatch  Amazon  AMZN  Netflix  NFLX  Crm  salesForce  Spotify  Tesla  TSLA  dotComLike 
august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
Scope: Preassigned Control Number Program - Publishers (Library of Congress)
http://www.loc.gov/publish/pcn/about/scope.html;;;
tags: Scope: Preassigned Control Number Program - Publishers ( Library of Congress ) | ebook are not eligible ineligible ;;;
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The following are ineligible:

Books that are already published.

Books which do not list a U.S. city as place of publication on the title page or copyright page.

Books for which Cataloging in Publication data has been (or will be) requested.

E-Books (i.e. books published in electronic format).
Scope:  Preassigned  Control  Number  Program  -  Publishers  (  Library  of  Congress  )  |  ebook  are  not  eligible  ineligible 
november 2017 by neerajsinghvns
CSS3 Web Fonts
https://www.w3schools.com/css/css3_fonts.asp;;;
tags: Web fonts allow Web designers to use fonts that are not installed on the user's computer.
html  css  CSS3  Web  fonts  allow  designers  to  use  font  that  are  not  installed  on  the  user's  computer  web-safe  safe  needsEditing  w3schools 
september 2017 by neerajsinghvns
How Plastic Bottles are Made - YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T01i_vp2mJE&feature;=related;;;
at 02:20 commentary, rod is inserted to stretch the preform length wise;;;
injection
and
then
stretch
blow
molding
video
How
Plastic
Bottles
are
Made
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YouTube
injection  and  then  stretch  blow  molding  video  How  Plastic  Bottles  are  Made  -  YouTube 
november 2011 by neerajsinghvns

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