recentpopularlog in

neerajsinghvns : interestingreading   20

Why Amazon will triple to $5,000 a share, according to the this hedge fund manager - MarketWatch
MarketWatch
Our call of the day, from Doug Kass, president of Seabreeze Partners Management, who predicts Amazon shares, currently at $1,818, could more than triple in a few years. Read the full story
Shared from Apple News
Why  Amazon  will  triple  to  $5_000  a  share_  according  the  this  hedge  fund  manager  -  MarketWatch  AMZN  needsEditing  Interesting  Reading  InterestingReading  Komal  Neha  Sonu  &  Neeraj 
april 2019 by neerajsinghvns
YouTube
10 Most Interesting Inventions for Construction 2018
10  Most  Interesting  Inventions  for  Construction  2018  Reading  InterestingReading  needs 
september 2018 by neerajsinghvns
The Washington Post: A guide to the financial crisis — 10 years later
The Washington Post
Ten questions as we look back at the Great Recession. Read the full story
Shared from Apple News
Please click on "Reply All" when replying to this email.
Thank you,
-
A  guide  to  the  financial  crisis    10  years  later  WP  Washington  Post  WashingtonPost  needsEditing  Interesting  Reading  InterestingReading  investment 
september 2018 by neerajsinghvns
A stock-market bear signal is at a more-than-4-decade high, says Goldman - MarketWatch
A stock-market bear signal is at a more-than-4-decade high, says Goldman
Mark DeCambre
Getty Images
Goldman’s bull-bear indicator is flashing red.
A gauge of bullish and bearish momentum in the U.S. stock market is ringing alarms for strategists at Goldman Sachs.
The investment bank’s so-called bull-bear indicator, which examines five market factors, indicates that the likelihood of a bear market occurring is at its highest point since around the mid-1970s (see chart below).
Goldman analysts led by Peter Oppenheimer, chief global equities strategist, said an unusual period for Wall Street, characterized by loose monetary policy and a recent spate of fiscal stimulus has resulted in an uncannily bullish cycle for markets that is likely to come to a screeching halt.
However, the upshot of the 54-page Goldman report dated Sept. 4 isn’t that investors should panic and head for the hills, but rather that a period of lower returns should be anticipated (see chat below).
The report comes as U.S. stocks have registered a decadelong, bull rally, making it the lengthiest period of equity-market prosperity, by certain measures, with the S&P 500 index SPX, +0.27% advancing more than 320% since the depths of the financial crisis in 2009. The Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA, -0.08% during that period, has climbed nearly 300%, while the Nasdaq Composite Index COMP, +0.23% has rallied by more than 520%, underscoring the outsize returns in the technology-and-internet related sector that has helped to buttress the broader stock market then and now.
Thus far in 2018, the S&P 500 has gained 7.6%, the Dow has climbed about 5%, while the tech-centric Nasdaq has soared by nearly 15% in the first nine months of the year. (However, the tech sector has come under severe pressure in the past week).
Goldman points out that tech performance has also coincided with strong earnings, or earnings per share, performance for tech-related stocks (see chart below):
Still, Oppenheimer, in a phone interview with MarketWatch, cautioned against interpreting the Goldman report as a staunchly bearish outlook. “We’re not flying the flag here and saying that there is going to be a deep bear market.”
He said some of the effects of any downturn may be moderated by a number of factors including an interest rate environment here and abroad that remains accommodative even as the world’s central banks aim to reset their monetary policy from financial crisis mode.
The Federal Reserve is widely expected to lift interest rates later this month at the conclusion of its two-day policy-setting gathering on Sept. 26. Oppenheimer also said that inflation remains subdued and that makes it unlikely that the Fed will feel a need to dial rates up rapidly to cool an overheated economy. “That may be one of the reason why we don’t see an economic downturn” in the cards, the Goldman strategists told MarketWatch.
Oppenheimer reiterated one line contained within the Goldman research report that reflects the unusual combination of monetary and fiscal stimulus that has given rise to such strong returns, noting that “the current cycle has been difficult to pin down” (read the excerpt from the report below):
Given such strong returns, many investors are wondering how long the economic cycle and bull market can last, and what type of conditions could follow. The difficulty in answering these questions is that the current cycle has been difficult to pin down. It has been, and remains, a very unusual cycle, making historical comparisons less reliable. The following are a few ‘unconventional’ aspects of the post financial crisis cycle that we should think about.
A 20% decline for the market, representing the typical definition of a bear market for an asset, hasn’t occurred in years (see chart below), according to Goldman, and may be halting for investors that have grown accustomed to this current phase of mostly levitating markets.
The upshot that Goldman offers to its clients: Brace for more modest to flat returns in the years ahead.
Read: Despite stock records, bears have ‘unfinished business’ with market, Morgan Stanley warns
Also read: Prepare for the biggest stock-market selloff in months, Morgan Stanley warns
More from MarketWatch
Barack Obama once got kicked out of Disneyland for smoking with his friends
All Americans would get an income boost under this new plan to share the country’s riches
Stocks are in ‘the danger zone,’ and it is ‘assured’ that a bear market will occur in the next year, analyst warns
SPONSORED CONTENT
Please click on "Reply All" when replying to this email.
Thank you,
-
S&P500  SandP500  S&P  500  over  the  years  best  bull  market  Goldman  Sachs  investment  retirement  needsEditing  Interesting  Reading  InterestingReading 
september 2018 by neerajsinghvns
401(k) Mistakes to Avoid | 401ks | US News
401(k) Mistakes to Avoid
Those who understand the 401(k) rules can take care to minimize penalties and fees.
Fees and penalties for your 401(k) can often be avoided if you understand how your 401(k) plan works. You can also take advantage of employer contributions and tax breaks once you figure out how to qualify. Here's how to fix several common 401(k) problems.
A low default savings rate. Many employees are automatically enrolled in a 401(k) plan, typically at the default savings rate of 3 percent. But sticking with this low savings rate could be a mistake. "That 3 percent is not enough," says Shannon Nutter-Wiersbitzky, head of participant strategy and development at Vanguard. "If a younger person could start at the 12 percent rate, they are certainly going to benefit tremendously from the benefit of compounding over time." If you can't save that much at the beginning of your career, aim to increase contributions each year. "It's typical that you would start at potentially a lower percentage and then increase that over time," Nutter-Wiersbitzky says. "If you generally get your raise at the end of the year, set your 401(k) to automatically increase. You won't feel it as much in terms of what is being saved for you out of your pay."
[See: How to Max Out Your 401(k) in 2018.]
Missing out on the 401(k) match. Find out if your employer provides a 401(k) match, and make sure you save enough to qualify for the maximum possible match. One common 401(k) match formula is 50 cents per dollar saved up to 6 percent of pay. In this case you would need to save at least 6 percent of your salary in order to claim the full match. "A 401(k) match anywhere from 4 to 6 percent of pay is typical," says Gregg Levinson, a senior retirement consultant for Willis Towers Watson. "It might require 8 percent deferral [of your pay] to get the full 4 percent [match]."
Failing to maximize tax breaks. Workers defer paying income tax on the money they contribute to a traditional 401(k) plan. Participants can delay paying taxes on up to $18,500 in 2018. Those age 50 and older can make catch-up contributions of up to an additional $6,000. A 55-year-old in the 24 percent tax bracket could reduce his income tax bill by $5,880 if he maxes out his 401(k) plan. "There is a big tax advantage if you contribute to the max allowed," says Lavina Nagar, a certified financial planner and president of Maya Advisors in Palo Alto, California. "If you can stretch yourself and save the full $18,500, that is the ideal situation." Income tax won't be due on the money in your traditional 401(k) plan until it is distributed from the account.
Automatically accepting the default investment. Workers who are automatically enrolled in a 401(k) plan are invested in a default fund selected by the plan sponsor. The most common default investment is a target-date fund, which typically contains a mix of stocks, bonds and cash that grows more conservative over time. However, the fees, underlying investments and rate at which the fund grows more conservative won't be an ideal fit for all employees. Take a look at the other investment options in your 401(k) plan before sticking with a target-date fund.
Paying excessive 401(k) fees. While some 401(k) plans negotiate for low costs on behalf of their employees, others are riddled with expensive funds and excessive fees. However, you can move your money to lower cost funds within your 401(k) plan. Your 401(k) plan is required to send each participant an annual 401(k) fee disclosure statement that lists how much each fund in the 401(k) plan costs to own in a single chart. "There are disclosures that have to come with those investments that detail the fees," says John Scott, director of the The Pew Charitable Trust's retirement savings project. "You should be able to get that information from your human resources person or the plan service provider or the mutual fund provider." Check this document each year to see if there are lower cost funds in the 401(k) plan that will meet your investment needs.
[See: 9 Ways to Avoid 401(k) Fees and Penalties.]
Leaving the company before you are vested. You don't get to keep employer contributions to your 401(k) until you are vested in the account. Some 401(k) plans immediately vest company deposits, while others require several years of job tenure before you can keep any of the 401(k) match. There are also graduated vesting schedules that permit employees to keep a portion of the 401(k) match based on their years of service at the company, and some employers require five or six years on the job before employees qualify for the entire 401(k) match. "Vesting can be immediate or vesting can stretch over a period of time," Nagar says. "If you move you might leave something on the table, and that should be part of your negotiation for the new job."
Triggering the 401(k) early withdrawal penalty. Cashing out your 401(k) plan before age 59 1/2 (or in some cases age 55) will trigger a 10 percent early withdrawal penalty in addition to the income tax you will owe on the distribution. A $5,000 withdrawal at age 50 will result in a $500 early withdrawal penalty and another $1,200 in income tax for someone in the 24 percent tax bracket.
Initiating a 401(k) loan. If you need access to your savings before retirement, account owners are often allowed to take a 401(k) loan of as much as 50 percent of the vested account balance up to $50,000. The loan typically must be paid back with interest within five years. However, 401(k) loans charge a variety of fees and you miss out on the investment gains you could have earned in the account. "It should be a last resort because the interest isn't deductible and you're tapping into a retirement asset," says David Clarken, a certified financial planner for FWI Wealth Management in Atlanta, Georgia. If you leave your job, the loan balance must be paid back by the due date of your federal income tax return. Loans that aren't repaid on time are considered distributions, and taxes and penalties may apply.
Forgetting to take 401(k) distributions in retirement. 401(k) withdrawals are required after age 70 1/2. The penalty for missing a required distribution is 50 percent of the amount that should have been withdrawn. But you don't need to wait until age 70 to take retirement account distributions. Some retirees start withdrawals during their 60s, which allows you to space out the tax bill and in some cases pay a lower tax rate.
[See: How to Pay Less Taxes on Retirement Account Withdrawals.]
Ignoring old 401(k) plans. When you change jobs you can generally leave your retirement account balance in the 401(k) plan. You might want to maintain a 401(k) plan with a former employer if the plan has especially good investment options, low costs or contains company stock. However, if you have multiple 401(k) plans at several former employers you can simplify your financial life by consolidating accounts. Some workers open an IRA and roll their 401(k) balance into it each time they change jobs. Moving your money to an IRA maintains the tax benefits, while also giving you a wider range of investment options.
10 Tips for Rolling Over a 401(k) When You Change Jobs
1 of 12
(Getty Images)
Rollover options
Each time you change jobs you need to decide what to do with the money in your 401(k) plan. While you can typically leave the money in a former employer’s 401(k) plan, there’s also an opportunity to transfer your retirement savings to an individual retirement account or a new 401(k) plan. Here’s how to roll over your retirement savings when you leave a job.
Updated on May 16, 2018: This slideshow was originally published on Oct. 23, 2017, and has been updated with new information.
Maintain the tax benefits.
(Getty Images)
Maintain the tax benefits.
You can maintain the tax benefits of your 401(k) plan by rolling the account balance over to an IRA or transferring your savings to a new employer’s 401(k) if the plan allows it. However, there’s no need to make a quick decision. In most cases you can leave the money in a former employer’s 401(k) plan. Take some time to find another tax-deferred account that has the investment options you want at the best possible price.
Transfer your money directly.
(Getty Images)
Transfer your money directly.
If you decide to move your money, you can avoid taxes and penalties by having the account balance directly transferred to a new retirement account via a trustee-to-trustee transfer. If a check is made out to you, 20 percent will be withheld for income tax. If you don’t put the entire distribution, including the withheld 20 percent, in a new retirement account within 60 days you will owe income tax on that money. A 10 percent early withdrawal penalty could also apply if you are under age 55. A trustee-to-trustee transfer allows you to avoid the tax withholding and potential fees.
Find better investment options.
(Getty Images)
Find better investment options.
401(k) plans have a limited menu of funds, typically chosen by an employer, plan sponsor or consultant. While some 401(k) plans provide excellent investment options for participants, other 401(k) plans are riddled with overpriced funds and unnecessary fees. IRAs have a much wider selection of investment options. Take some time to shop around for the investments that make the most sense for your retirement portfolio. A job change can be an opportunity to move your money into better funds with lower fees.
Keep costs low.
(Getty Images)
Keep costs low.
Retirement accounts charge a variety of administrative and maintenance fees and each individual fund charges an expense ratio or fee to maintain the fund and perhaps other costs. However, it is increasingly possible to find retirement accounts and funds that charge very low fees. It’s especially important to choose low-cost funds for your retirement savings because you are investing over a long period of time and might pay those fees for several decades. Paying lower fees means you get to keep more of your investment returns.
Pay attention … [more]
If  it  is  something  urgent_  after  you  send  me  the  details  by  email_  please  contact  text  401(k)  401k  Mistakes  to  Avoid  |  401ks  US  News  needsEditing  Interesting  Reading  InterestingReading 
august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
20 Awesome Dividend Stocks for Guaranteed Income | Investing | US News
20 Awesome Dividend Stocks for Guaranteed Income
The best of the best dividend stocks pay investors like clockwork every quarter. What's not to like?
The best thing about holding stocks, of course, is the fact that you're gaining wealth and building a nest egg that you'll need to retire someday. But what if you could get paid to hold those stocks? That's the beauty of dividend stocks, which offer a payout (usually quarterly) to shareholders. And the best dividend stocks are known as dividend aristocrats, which are companies in the Standard & Poor's 500 index that have increased their payouts for 25 consecutive years. Companies carry the dividend aristocrat label as a badge of honor, so these companies will fight to continue to increase these yields. All an investor has to do is collect their cash. And smile.
Thank you,
-
Sent from my phone. Please ignore any Auto Correction errors.
20  Awesome  Dividend  Stocks  for  Guaranteed  Income  |  Investing  US  News  Interesting  Reading  InterestingReading  needsEditing 
august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
Why Denmark is the Happiest Country - YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eKa-3lbLeyA ;;;
tags: Why Denmark is the Happiest Country - YouTube | video interesting reading interestingReading ;;;
Why  Denmark  is  the  Happiest  Country  -  YouTube  |  video  interesting  reading  interestingReading 
august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
5 Stocks That Should Start Paying Dividends
5 Stocks That Should Start Paying Dividends
August 6, 2018, 9:37 PM EDT
Getty Images
Investors tend to be drawn to hot technology and biotechnology stocks for their growth prospects - not for the cash they return to shareholders. But several well-known tech and biotech stocks could afford to invest in their businesses, buy back their shares and pay dividends, if only they chose to.
When it comes to returning cash to shareholders, corporate management often prefers stock buybacks to dividends because it gives them flexibility. A company can adjust its share repurchases according to business and market conditions. A dividend is a commitment. The market often exacts severe and swift revenge if a company cuts or suspends its payout.
The initiation of a dividend can also be taken as a sign that a company or stock's best days are behind it. A quick look at Apple's (AAPL) performance shows that's not necessarily the case. The company reinstated its dividend in 2012 after a 17-year hiatus. Between price appreciation and payouts, Apple stock has delivered a total return of about 170% since March 2012, when it announced plans to reinstate its dividend later that year - the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index is up about 130% over the same span, including dividends.
The following five stocks don't yet offer dividends, but they should ... and could. Each has the cash-generation ability to start a regular payout without giving up on share repurchases and investments in future growth.
SEE ALSO: 53 Best Dividend Stocks for 2018 and Beyond
Adobe Systems
Getty Images
Market value: $124 billion
Analysts' opinion: 15 strong buy, 1 buy, 7 hold, 0 sell, 0 strong sell
Adobe Systems (ADBE, $253.28) has long been dominant in its niche of providing software for designers and other creative types. Photoshop, Premiere Pro for video editing and Dreamweaver for website design are just some of its hit products, and its shift to delivering them through cloud-based subscription services is generating tremendous growth.
Revenue is forecast to rise 22% this year and 19% next year, according to a survey of analysts by Thomson Reuters. Earnings are expected to increase at an average annual clip of 24% for the next half-decade.
Investors aren't clamoring for a dividend with that sort of torrid growth on the horizon. And it's not like Adobe isn't returning cash to shareholders already. It spent $1.6 billion on stock buybacks over the 12 months ended June 1, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence. But it could afford to give them more.
Even after share repurchases and interest payments on debt, Adobe generated free cash flow - the mother's milk of dividends - of $2.6 billion during the 12 months ended June 1.
SEE ALSO: 39 European Dividend Aristocrats for International Income Growth
Alphabet
Getty Images
Market value: $861.4 billion
Analysts' opinion: 24 strong buy, 4 buy, 2 hold, 0 sell, 0 strong sell
Alphabet (GOOGL, $1,238.16), the corporate parent of Google, is another technology giant with such outsize growth prospects that it can get away with not paying a dividend.
But the fact remains that it easily could - even after European regulators hit it with a record $5 billion antitrust fine.
The search giant's revenue is forecast to increase 23% this year and 19% next year, according to Thomson Reuters data. Earnings are expected to increase at an average annual rate of 18% for the next five years.
Alphabet is plowing investments into the next big things. It has artificial intelligence, machine learning and virtual reality in its sights, and it's already a major player in cloud-based services. But it's still swimming in cash.
The company had $102 billion in cash and short-term investments as of June 30 and just $3.9 billion in long-term debt, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence. Alphabet bought back $6.3 billion of its own shares over the 12 months ended June 30, and still generated $22 billion in free cash flow, so it clearly has the financial means to initiate a dividend without risking its R&D.
SEE ALSO: The 10 Best Dividend Stocks of All Time
Biogen
Courtesy Citizen Schools Photo via Flickr
Market value: $69.0 billion
Analysts' opinion: 17 strong buy, 1 buy, 7 hold, 0 sell, 0 strong sell
It might be time for Biogen (BIIB, $344.21) to start paying a dividend.
It wouldn't be the first big biotechnology stock with slower growth prospects to do so. After all, peers such as Amgen (AMGN) and Gilead Sciences (GILD) pay dividends with yields of 2.7% and 2.9%, respectively.
A dividend also could help smooth out some of the volatility that BIIB investors have had to deal with. Mixed results from a mid-stage clinical trial of Biogen's promising Alzheimer's drug made July a month to remember. Biogen rose more than 30% between June 29 and July 25 ... but the stock is down by double digits ever since.
Expected top-line growth isn't as explosive as Alphabet and Adobe, at just 7% this year and 3% next year. Annual long-term earnings growth is promising, though, at nearly 8% for BIIB, according to Thomson Reuters.
Biogen bought back $3 billion of its own stock over the 12 months ended June 30, while generating $3.9 billion in free cash flow even after paying interest on debt. Biogen certainly can afford to return more cash to shareholders.
SEE ALSO: 10 Double-Digit Dividend Growth Stocks to Shield Your Portfolio
Booking Holdings
Getty Images
Market value: $98.4 billion
Analysts' opinion: 15 strong buy, 4 buy, 8 hold, 0 sell, 0 strong sell
Booking Holdings (BKNG, $2,029.71), the online travel website operator formerly known as Priceline.com, has sturdy growth prospects, but it's not like they're accelerating anymore.
Analysts expect earnings to increase at an average annual rate of 14.7% for the next five years. That compares with average annual earnings growth of 15.6% over the past five years - in other words, good, but slowing down. Revenue is forecast to rise 19% this year and 12% in 2019.
Booking's strategy of growth through acquisitions and investments hasn't precluded it from buying back its own stock - or generating ample free cash flow. The company repurchased $2.3 billion in BKNG shares in the 12 months ended March 31. It also generated $3.4 billion in free cash flow after paying interest on debt.
Booking's shareholders aren't clamoring for a dividend, but it absolutely could afford to initiate one. That would ensure a little extra total return and perhaps tamp down what historically has been a relatively volatile stock.
SEE ALSO: The 7 Highest-Rated Dividend Aristocrats
Facebook
Getty Images
Market value: $515.9 billion
Analysts' opinion: 25 strong buy, 3 buy, 2 hold, 0 sell, 0 strong sell
Facebook (FB, $177.78) set a record for the most market value wiped out in a single trading session when the stock lost 19%, or $120 billion, on July 26. That came on fears that it has entered a new era of slower revenue growth and narrower profit margins. Shares have drifted lower ever since.
Earnings that have grown at an average annual rate of 64% for the past five years are now expected to rise "only" 21% a year for the next half-decade. Revenue is forecast to increase 37% this year, but "just" 25% next year.
If Facebook's days of outrageous growth (relatively speaking) really are over, one thing it could do to sweeten the pot for its stock is to start paying a dividend. It has more than enough firepower to do so and still pour resources into acquisitions, research and development.
Facebook had $42.3 billion in cash and short-term investments as of June 30 - and no long-term debt against it. It bought back $6.7 billion of its own stock during the 12 months ended June 30, while generating $11.3 billion in free cash flow. Returning some more of that cash to shareholders could go a long way toward rebuilding faith in Facebook stock.
SEE ALSO: 8 Great Dividend Stocks Yielding 8% or More
EDITOR'S PICKS
53 Best Dividend Stocks for 2018 and Beyond
Millionaires in America: All 50 States Ranked
20 Best Small-Cap Dividend Stocks to Buy
Copyright 2018 The Kiplinger Washington Editors
Please click on "Reply All" when replying to this email.
Thank you,
-
Sent from my phone. Please ignore any auto correction errors.
If it is something urgent, after you send me the details by email, please contact me by text.
5  Stocks  That  Should  Start  Paying  Dividends  Interesting  Reading  InterestingReading  bubble  amazon  amzn  netflix  netflx  tesla  tsla  crm  salesforce  spotify 
august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
Khabar: People in Peril: Indians in South Africa
http://www.khabar.com/magazine/cover-story/people_in_peril_indians_in_south_africa ;;;
tags: Khabar : People in Peril : Indians in South Africa inre interesting reading interestingReading ;;;
-
search for:
affirmative action
hierarchy
Khabar  :  People  in  Peril  Indians  South  Africa  |  law  and  order  inre  interesting  reading  interestingReading 
january 2018 by neerajsinghvns
Magazine Archives - Indian-American Community Magazine in Atlanta, GA | Khabar.com
2018, Jan: Page 40; PAN & AADHAAR Cards; from confusion to clarity.
2018, Jan: Page 44; Cookies & Buiscuits. The witty wordsmith, Shashi Tharoor takes a mirthful look at the old adage that Britain and U.S. are countries divided by a common language.
khabar  magazine  archives  interesting  reading  interestingReading 
january 2018 by neerajsinghvns
Super Reel Introduction - YouTube
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=P9Krhd6ZGhE ;;;
tags: Super Reel Introduction - YouTube | video fastcap Interesting Reading InterestingReading competitor vaccum hose 2.5 inch 2.5" needsEditing ;;;
Super  Reel  Introduction  -  YouTube  |  video  fastcap  Interesting  Reading  InterestingReading  competitor  vaccum  hose  2.5  inch  2.5"  needsEditing 
november 2017 by neerajsinghvns

Copy this bookmark:





to read