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20200205 1115 EMR DEMO GlacePremium by Michael Levin - YouTube
http://youtu.be/URIQQGv6_Ys?hd=1 ;;;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URIQQGv6_Ys&feature=youtu.be&hd=1 ;;;
tags: 20200205 1115 EMR DEMO GlacePremium by Michael Levin - YouTube || video PSN training review Sonu ecw eClinicalWorks competitor ;;;
20200205  1115  EMR  DEMO  GlacePremium  by  Michael  Levin  -  YouTube  ||  video  PSN  training  review  Sonu  ecw  eClinicalWorks  competitor 
10 days ago by neerajsinghvns
The Washington Post : Google just debuted impressive new travel features Here’s how they can make you a smarter planner needsEditing wp waPo
Google just debuted impressive new travel features. Here’s how they can make you a smarter planner.
Here's how new the tools — which emphasize custom results (based on your searches) and price transparency, all at rapid speed — are useful.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/travel/tips/google-travel-debuted-impressive-new-features-heres-how-they-can-make-you-smarter-planner/
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If  it  is  something  urgent_  after  you  send  me  details  by  email_  please  send  me  a  one  line  text  message.  The  Washington  Post  :  Critics  say  Facebook’s  powerful  ad  tools  may  imperil  democracy  But  politicians  love  them  NeedsEditing  microtargeting  micro  targeting  custom  audience  WP  WaPo 
26 days ago by neerajsinghvns
Tesla Model Y Unveil - YouTube
12:00; making a prototype is hard.
manufacturing is 100 times harder%
Tesla  Model  Y  Unveil  -  YouTube  needsEditing  presentation  by  elon  musk 
august 2019 by neerajsinghvns
Must Watch Reality of Kashmiri Hindus Explained by Sushil Pandit Which Y...
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Must  Watch  Reality  of  Kashmiri  Hindus  Explained  by  Sushil  Pandit  Which  NeedsEditing  Kashmir  india  pundit 
august 2019 by neerajsinghvns
The Phoblographer : Photography Cheat Sheet : Simple Portrait Lighting Techniques needsEditing howTo take shoot photograph photographs
The Phoblographer
Getting the lighting right is key when it comes to shooting professional-looking portraits. While it doesn't always have to involve complex setups, it can be daunting to figure out where to start if you're still new to portrait lighting techniques. With this quick tutorial and cheat sheet, you have a bunch of simple lighting styles to try for your next practice. Read the full story
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august 2019 by neerajsinghvns
OCI
https://ociservices.gov.in/statusEnqury ;;;
https://ociservices.gov.in/ ;;;
https://www.in.ckgs.us/shipping/ ;;;
tags: oci application ;;;
PASSPORT NUMBER FOR nxs= XXXYYY516
oci ONLINE REGISTRATION NUMBER = USAA025C3N19
oci  application  LOGIN  visa  pio  card  website  by  government  of  india 
july 2019 by neerajsinghvns
how to add pages from a fax to a patient's chart as a pdf - YouTube
http://youtu.be/SwIltBlTH7k?hd=1 ;;;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SwIltBlTH7k&feature=youtu.be&hd=1
tags: how to add pages from a fax patient's chart as pdf - YouTube psn training ecw eClinicalWorks by Ms. Doshi ;;;
how  to  add  pages  from  a  fax  patient's  chart  as  pdf  -  YouTube  psn  training  ecw  eClinicalWorks  by  Ms.  Doshi 
june 2019 by neerajsinghvns
eClinicalWorks v10: How to Unlock a User’s Account - Lake Cook Orthopedics - powered by Helpdesk Pilot
https://helpdesk.lakecookortho.com/kb/article/23/ ;;;
tags: ecw eClinicalWorks v10: How to Unlock a User’s Users Account - Lake Cook Orthopedics - powered by Helpdesk Pilot ;;;
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https://gapeasapp.ecwcloud.com/mobiledoc/jsp/webemr/login/newLogin.jsp;;;
---
in Version 11; when logged in via the web browser, <<< <<< <<< <<< <<< <<< <<< <<< <<< <<<
click on the hamburger stack at the top left corner,
click on Admin,
click on Login Settings,
go to Unlock Users, in the bottom right corner,
click on the User that needs to be unLocked,
click on OK.
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in version 11 when logged in via client <<< <<< <<< <<< <<< <<< <<< <<< <<< <<<
File > security settings > Locked Users (Bottom border) > Click on the user needing to be unlocked > UnLock
ecw  eClinicalWorks  v10:  How  to  Unlock  a  User’s  Users  Account  -  Lake  Cook  Orthopedics  powered  by  Helpdesk  Pilot  Lock 
may 2019 by neerajsinghvns
Please use the following address
400 Country club Drive
Stockbridge, GA 30281
to get close (to about 100-200 feet)
to the gate / entrance of our subdivision / colony,
(Eagles Landing Country Club)
Only after entering the sub division / colony, should the taxi driver plug in the following Home address in the GPS;
912 Northern Pines Drive,
McDonough, GA 30253
If the 912NPD address is plugged in to begin with, the GPS has a tendency to use the
- wrong exit number on the interstate and
- wrong entrance (unattended) to the subdivision.
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april 2019 by neerajsinghvns
Tested: Should You Unplug Chargers When You’re Not Using Them?
https://www.howtogeek.com/231886/tested-should-you-unplug-chargers-when-youre-not-using-them/ ;;;
tags: how much energy is consumed by cell mobile phone charger chargers if they are left plugged in kill-a-watt kill a watt ;;;
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if you leave your cell phone charger plugged in, all year long, it costs about 5 and a half cents.
how  much  energy  is  consumed  by  cell  mobile  phone  charger  chargers  if  they  are  left  plugged  in  kill-a-watt  kill  a  watt 
april 2019 by neerajsinghvns
The Best Maker YouTube Channels | Cool Tools
tags: interesting stuff on YouTube recommended by coal tools needsEditing ;;;
interesting  stuff  on  YouTube  recommended  by  coal  tools  needsEditing 
march 2019 by neerajsinghvns
20190214-0914-Messenger-SMS-training-by-divyaTefella-ecw - YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOhM83dD8Dw&feature=youtu.be ;;;
20190214-0914 Messenger SMS training by divyaTefella ecw YouTube video psn ;;;
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This video should be available only when you are logged into your psn email.
If available otherwise, please inform Mike Neeraj Singh at XXX-YYY-4411.
20190214-0914  Messenger  SMS  training  by  DivyaTefella  Divya  Tefella  ecw  YouTube  video  psn 
february 2019 by neerajsinghvns
World's First Car! - YouTube
tags: world’s first car by karl benz from Germany ;;;
working  model  of  world’s  first  car  by  karl  benz  from  Germany  needsEditing 
january 2019 by neerajsinghvns
I was BLOWN AWAY by this innovation in REAL Hardwood Floors! - YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIqOgqpNLXw ;;;
tags: I was BLOWN AWAY by this innovation in REAL Hardwood floor Floors ! - YouTube video Matt Risinger ;;;
I  was  BLOWN  AWAY  by  this  new  technology  innovation  in  REAL  Hardwood  floor  Floors  !  -  YouTube  video  Matt  Risinger 
january 2019 by neerajsinghvns
How to create a Facebook business page - step by step instructions - YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAKEddOEd00 ;;;
tags: How to create a Facebook business page - step by step instructions - YouTube needsEditing ;;;
How  to  create  a  Facebook  business  page  -  step  by  instructions  YouTube  needsEditing 
january 2019 by neerajsinghvns
Word a Day Revisited Index of Cartoons Illustrating the Meanings of Words - Getting English Words
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:1/s:sedition ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:17 ; letter "b" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:20 ; letter "c" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:27 ; letter "d" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:33 ; letter "e" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:37 ; letter "f" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:40 ; letter "g" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:41 ; letter "h" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:43 ; letter "i" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:49 ; letter "j" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:50 ; letters "k" & "l" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:51 ; letter "m" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:56 ; letter "n" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:57 ; letter "o" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:58 ; letter "p" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:67 ; letter "q" & "r" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:71 ; letter "s" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:76 ; letter "t" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:79 ; letter "u" & "v" ;;;
http://getwords.com/units/view/262/page:83 ; letter "w", "x" & "z" ;;;
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Word a Day Revisited Index of Cartoons Illustrating the Meanings of Words - Getting English Words ;;;
tags: alphabetical order list listing of cartoon cartoons by mickey bach needsEditing in ;;;
cartoon  cartoons  mickey  bach  in  alphabetical  order  needsEditing  list  listing  of  by  search 
december 2018 by neerajsinghvns
[no title]
http://www.lehman.edu/academics/arts-humanities/piccirilli/ ;;;
http://www.lehman.edu/academics/arts-humanities/piccirilli/memoir.php ;;;
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The memoir has a sad ending.
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tags: lehman brothers brothers? statue of abraham lincoln in the LincolnMemorial memorial was carved by Piccirilli needsEditing memoir wonderful font in a diary ;;;
lehman  brothers  brothers?  statue  of  abraham  lincoln  in  the  LincolnMemorial  memorial  was  carved  by  Piccirilli  needsEditing  memoir  wonderful  font  a  diary 
november 2018 by neerajsinghvns
YouTube
https://m.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD4F0325ED4DDF1C8 ;;;
tags: america by air arial needsEditing skyWorks showReels skyWorksHD YouTube video Videos ;;;
america  by  air  arial  needsEditing  skyWorks  showReels  skyWorksHD  YouTube  video  Videos 
november 2018 by neerajsinghvns
Cascading Drop-down Navigation Menu with CSS (Part 2) - YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T7ayE5AtRUA ;;;-
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tags: HTML CSS cascading dropDown nav navigation menu youTube video by ralph needsEditing howTo create build convert hyperlink to button ;;;
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00:00; what is going on.
00:00; what is going on.
00:00; what is going on.
00:15; refresh of what was done in Part 1.
01:05; horizontal layout / list; {float: left};
11:10; submenus disappear;
11:25; positioning of sub2;
12:00; move sub2 from below to right;
13:00; make sure that borders touch to ensure that menu items stay open.
16:10; give a visual indicator about which items have submenus;
HTML  CSS  cascading  dropDown  nav  navigation  menu  youTube  video  by  ralph  needsEditing  howTo  create  build  convert  hyperlink  to  button 
october 2018 by neerajsinghvns
YouTube; Cascading Drop-down Navigation Menu with CSS (Part 1)
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TmQm-p3wCSU ;;;
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tags: dropDown menu youTube video by ralph needsEditing howTo create build HTML CSS cascading nav navigation howto instead of just the hyperlinks, the entire button becomes a hyperlink link ;;;
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00:00; what is going on.
00:00; what is going on.
00:00; what is going on.
00:00; what is going on.
00:00; what is going on.
00:00; what is going on.
10:45; positioning of hyperlinks.
11:47; convert un-ordered list of hyperlinks to positioning them like a set of drop down menus.
displaying anchor tags; code> ul#navmenu a { }.
12:10; get rid of underline; {text decoration: none}
12:15; convert inline element anchor tags in to block elements. {display: block;}
12:25; make list items behave more like buttons. instead of just the hyperlinks, the entire button becomes a hyperlink.
12:50;
{display: block;
width: 125px;
height: 25px;
}
dropDown  menu  youTube  video  by  ralph  needsEditing  howTo  create  build  HTML  CSS  cascading  nav  navigation  instead  of  just  the  hyperlinks  entire  button  becomes  a  hyperlink  link 
october 2018 by neerajsinghvns
How to Create a Website: Step-by-Step Guide for Beginners (2018)
https://websitesetup.org/ ;;;
How to Create a Website: Step-by-Step Guide for Beginners (2018) ;;;
tags: How to Create a Website: Step-by-Step Guide for Beginners (2018) | make StepByStep Step by GettingStarted needsEditing wordpress ;;;
How  to  Create  a  Website:  Step-by-Step  Guide  for  Beginners  (2018)  |  make  StepByStep  Step  by  GettingStarted  needsEditing  wordpress 
october 2018 by neerajsinghvns
google Fi - Google Search
Project Fi is a mobile virtual network operator by Google, providing phone, messaging and data services using both Wi-Fi and cellular networks belonging to Sprint, T-Mobile, U.S. Cellular, and Three. The service was launched on April 22, 2015, for the Nexus 6 through invitations only. Wikipedia
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tags: google Fi - Search | cell phone service by ;;;
google  Fi  -  Search  |  cell  phone  service  by 
october 2018 by neerajsinghvns
Travel Channel: How to Tip Around the World
https://www.travelchannel.com/interests/food-and-drink/photos/how-to-tip-around-the-world ;;;
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Travel Channel
Tipping can be a controversial topic, since whether or not you should tip, and how much, depends on who you ask. Therefore, consider this a general guideline, keeping in mind that there are no hard and fast rules in many countries. United States It should be noted that even in countries without a tipping history, an increasing number of people in the service industry, especially in touristy areas, have come to expect tips from Americans, even if they don’t expect tips from the locals. In those Read the full story
Shared from Apple News
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How to Tip tipping Around the World in different various countries cultures
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october 2018 by neerajsinghvns
sushila-gupta | nxsvns
https://nxsvns.wordpress.com/2018/10/04/sushila-gupta/ ;;;
https://wp.me/p2lv2v-bI ;;;
tags: nxsvns wordPress link to page with poems and essays by SXG sushila gupta sushilaGupta ;;;
nxsvns  wordPress  link  to  page  with  poems  and  essays  by  SXG  sushila  gupta  sushilaGupta 
october 2018 by neerajsinghvns
Smashwords – How to go from Average to SMART: SSAT & ISEE Math (UPPER) – a book by neeraj Raguvanshi
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/896405 ;;;
https://www.smashwords.com/about/supportfaq#ios ;;;
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bluefire-reader/id394275498?mt=8 ;;;
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tags: Smashwords – How to go from Average SMART : SSAT & ISEE Math (UPPER) a book by neeraj Raguvanshi || needsEditing ;;;
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Smashwords    How  to  go  from  Average  SMART  :  SSAT  &  ISEE  Math  (UPPER)  a  book  by  neeraj  Raguvanshi  ||  needsEditing  link  iBook 
september 2018 by neerajsinghvns
5 Warren Buffett Principles to Remember in a Volatile Stock Market -- The Motley Fool
5 Warren Buffett Principles to Remember in a Volatile Stock Market
The market has fallen quite a bit this week -- how would Warren Buffett react?
Over the past week, the Dow Jones Industrial Average has fallen by nearly 700 points, mainly fueled by fears of a global trade war. And there's no reason to think the volatility will subside anytime soon.
However, instead of panicking, it's important to take a step back and assess the situation from the standpoint of a rational, long-term-oriented investor. And there's no better rational long-term investor to learn from than Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK-A) (NYSE: BRK-B) CEO Warren Buffett. Here are five principles that the Oracle of Omaha uses during volatile markets that you can implement in your own investment strategy.
Image source: The Motley Fool.
The stock market is unpredictable -- all the time
In his most recent letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders, Buffett said: "The years ahead will occasionally deliver major market declines -- even panics -- that will affect virtually all stocks. No one can tell you when these traumas will occur."
The takeaway: The stock market is unpredictable, and large price swings are normal. And to be perfectly clear, this applies to the upside as well. I'll spare you the statistics lesson, but a gain of 45% or a loss of nearly 23% on the S&P 500 in any single year would not be considered unusual. Manage your expectations (and your reactions) accordingly.
Over the long term, there's only one direction the market will go
"Successful investing takes time, discipline and patience. No matter how great the talent or effort, some things just take time: You can't produce a baby in one month by getting nine women pregnant," Buffett has said.
While stocks can be wildly unpredictable over shorter time periods, they are surprisingly predictable over long periods. Over periods of several decades, the stock market has generated annualized returns of 9% to 10% per year. Since 1965, the S&P 500 has produced annualized total returns of 9.9%, for example, and this includes the dot-com bust, Black Monday in 1987, and the Great Recession. The point: Even the worst crashes are rather meaningless when it comes to long-term returns.
A correction or crash is not a bad thing for long-term investors
Of course, nobody enjoys watching the value of their brokerage account go down. I still look back on 2008 as a particularly traumatic period, and in full honesty, there were times when I considered throwing in the towel when it came to the stock market.
Thankfully, I didn't. I understood one important concept that all long-term investors should know: that corrections and panics are the best opportunities. When Buffett wrote his 2008 letter to shareholders in early 2009, when the market was close to the bottom, he took the opportunity to address the company's declining investment portfolio by saying: "This does not bother Charlie [Munger] and me. Indeed, we enjoy such price declines if we have funds available to increase our positions."
Think of it this way. If you were shopping at your favorite clothing store and everything suddenly became 30% cheaper, would you panic and run to your car? Of course you wouldn't -- you'd probably stock up while the sale was going on. The same logic applies here. From a long-term perspective, a correction or crash is nothing more than a really good sale.
When stocks start to fall, you'll want some financial flexibility
Look back to the Buffett quote I used in the previous section. By far, the most important part is "... if we have funds available to increase our positions."
In other words, a sale is only a good thing if you have the money available to take advantage of it. While I'm not an advocate of keeping large portions of your portfolio in cash, that doesn't mean that you should be 100% invested at all times either. Buffett loves to keep $20 billion to $30 billion in cash at all times on Berkshire's balance sheet (right now there is much more), and my personal preference is about 5% of my total portfolio in cash for the specific purpose of taking advantage of opportunities.
As Buffett says, "Opportunities come infrequently. When it rains gold, put out the bucket, not the thimble."
On a similar note, it's important to avoid using debt (margin) to invest in stocks. While margin investing can make you look like a genius when things are going well, it can amplify your losses and even wipe your entire portfolio out during tough times. In his most recent letter, Buffett wrote: "There is simply no telling how far stocks can fall in a short period. Even if your borrowings are small and your positions aren't immediately threatened by the plunging market, your mind may well become rattled by scary headlines and breathless commentary."
Avoid a herd mentality
One fact that has been well-documented in several studies is that the average stock investor underperforms the market over long periods of time, and by a wide margin.
A major reason for this is over-trading, and at the wrong times. As stocks are going through the roof, investors see everyone else making money, get greedy, and decide to throw as much money as possible into the "it" stocks. And when a correction or crash occurs, these same investors figure that they'd better sell while they still have some of their investment left. Too many investors buy high and sell low -- the exact opposite of the primary goal of investing.
"The most important quality for an investor is temperament, not intellect. You need a temperament that neither derives great pleasure from being with the crowd or against the crowd," says Buffett. In other words, keep your eye on the prize (long-term returns). The short-term noise is a dangerous distraction.
The bottom line: Don't panic
To sum up Buffett's attitude toward volatile markets: Don't fear volatility, keep some cash on the sidelines, and don't be afraid to take advantage of low stock prices even though it seems like everyone else is selling.
Something big just happened
I don't know about you, but I always pay attention when one of the best growth investors in the world gives me a stock tip. Motley Fool co-founder David Gardner and his brother, Motley Fool CEO Tom Gardner, just revealed two brand new stock recommendations. Together, they've tripled the stock market's return over the last 13 years.* And while timing isn't everything, the history of Tom and David's stock picks shows that it pays to get in early on their ideas.
Click here to be among the first people to hear about David and Tom's newest stock recommendations.
*Stock Advisor returns as of June 4, 2018
This Stock Could be like Buying Netflix for $1.87
We think the second-wave of the cord-cutting revolution is just beginning. And if you missed your chance to get in on Netflix early...then you are going to want to see this.
Because Motley Fool Co-Founder, David Gardner, has been following the cord-cutting revolution for years. David first recommended that members of Motley Fool Stock Advisor buy Netflix in 2004.
And Netflix stock rode the first wave of the cord-cutting revolution to massive gains. Investors who bought Netflix on the date when David first recommended it turned every $1,000 invested into nearly $145,050!
And that's why some savvy investors are sprinting to take advantage today. Because cord-cutting may finally be going mainstream.
And our experts think it's setting up an incredible opportunity for one tiny American company.
Learn more
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If  it  is  something  urgent_  after  you  send  me  the  details  by  email_  please  contact  text.  5  Warren  Buffett  Principles  to  Remember  in  a  Volatile  Stock  Market  needsEditing  investment  retirement 
september 2018 by neerajsinghvns
These are first 7 Alexa skills you should enable
https://www.cnet.com/how-to/the-first-alexa-skills-you-should-enable/
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august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
He's undermining support for fellow Republicans [Video]
Trump is scripting his own defeat in November
Rick NewmanAugust 2, 2018, 11:08 AM EDT
President Trump isn’t afraid to make enemies. Since he took down the Bush and Clinton dynasties—and many other opponents—in his upstart bid for the presidency in 2016, he seems to think there’s no foe able to derail his crusade.
But other Republicans aren’t as slippery, and Trump is making enemies on their behalf that could doom his own party dearly in the November midterm elections. Trump recently took aim at the huge political operation built by Charles and David Koch, the libertarian billionaires who flood millions of dollars into Republican election efforts. The Kochs are strong free-trade supporters, and Trump chided them for opposing his tariffs and other protectionist measures. “Total joke,” Trump tweeted on July 31. “I don’t need their money or bad ideas. Their network is overrated.”
Trump may not need Koch money, but a lot of other Republicans do. The Kochs didn’t support Trump in the 2016 election, but they didn’t oppose him either. And their network of donor organizations, including Americans for Prosperity and Freedom Partners, spent nearly $250 million politicking for other candidates who support their agenda, almost all of them Republicans. That spending undoubtedly helped push some Republican Congressional candidates over the top in tight races, solidifying GOP control of Congress and allowing the Trump tax cuts and other legislation to get through.
Dependent on the Koch network
Republicans need more help in 2018 than they did in 2016—and the Kochs are signaling they’re not likely to support Trump bandwagoners who back trade protectionism, tough restrictions on legal immigration and increased deficit spending. The group recently indicated it wouldn’t back Republican Senate candidates in North Dakota, Indiana and Nevada, all of which political analyst Larry Sabato rates as toss-ups that could potentially swing control of the Senate to Democrats.
If Trump further antagonizes the Koch network, their lack of support could be decisive in November. “The Republican party has grown to be dependent on the Koch donor network for hundreds of millions of dollars in election support,” says Robert Maguire of the Center for Responsive Politics, a campaign-finance watchdog. “It’s hard to downplay the impact their pullback would have on Republicans’ ability to make the case for their candidates in one of the most important midterms in a generation.”
Republicans hold the House by 23 seats, and there’s a good chance they could lose that many, or more, in the midterms, allowing Democrats to take control of at least one chamber. The Senate is a tougher prize for the Dems, but controlling the House would be enough to block most Republican legislation, mount aggressive investigations into Trump controversies, and possibly vote to impeach Trump.
The Kochs aren’t kingmakers, as Trump’s victory in 2016 proves. Their favorites for president included Scott Walker, Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio. Trump trounced them all. But the Koch network can target large sums of money in tight House or Senate races where a flurry of negative ads against an opponent might provide a crucial edge in the waning days of the campaign. Since most of the Koch spending takes place through so-called super PACs, there’s no limit on how much they can spend. And some of that spending is by groups that don’t have to report who the donors are.
Democrats’ advantage
Does Trump have a plan to provide an alternate source of funding for Republicans shunned by the Koch network? Not clear. There are super PACs that support Trump’s agenda, such as America First, Great America and 45Committee. But they seem unlikely to raise as much money as the Kochs, who have a base group of 700 wealthy activists committed to donating a minimum of $100,000 each. The pro-Trump groups may not be as willing to share the bounty with other Republicans, and they may not be as nimble at the Congressional level as the Koch operations.
Trump may also think his Twitter endorsement for favored candidates is the equivalent of a big, costly ad blitz – but that hasn’t proven out in general elections, so far. Trump endorsed Republican candidates who ended up losing in an Alabama Senate race last December and a Pennsylvania House race in March. He has endorsed other Republicans who won, but by smaller margins than in prior elections, suggesting the Trump stamp of approval may not stop a surge of Democratic voters.
Trump seems to be giving Democrats another advantage by intensifying his trade protectionism, even as stories mount of Americans hurt by those policies. The latest tightening of the screw is a plan to raise the possible tariff on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports from 10% to 25%. Trump has already imposed tariffs on $91 billion of imports, which has triggered retaliatory tariffs of similar magnitude on U.S. exports. About 20% of all U.S. agricultural exports are now subject to higher tariffs, which is hurting farm income along with Trump’s popularity in farm states.
Trump seems to be ratcheting up the pressure on China in the hope they’ll blink and give him a deal he can call a victory before the November midterms. But the Chinese could have another plan: They might stall until November, leaving Trump’s tariffs in place along with various retaliations aimed at Americans. That way, they’d be giving American voters the chance to punish Trump for his tariffs, which would weaken Trump’s hand in negotiations, while strengthening China’s. Trump’s enemies have many targets, and if they hurt Trump’s enablers they will hurt Trump himself.
Confidential tip line: rickjnewman@yahoo.com. Click here to get Rick’s stories by email.
Read more:
Some Republican approve of Russia’s help in elections
There’s a hole in the Trump economy
Business tax payments plunge, as workers pay more
Why Trump supporters never waver
Socialists are coming for the Democratic party
The Trump tax cuts still aren’t helping regular folks
Rick Newman is the author of four books, including “Rebounders: How Winners Pivot from Setback to Success.” Follow him on Twitter: @rickjnewman
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What to say when a job interviewer asks, ‘Do you have any questions?’
What to say when a job interviewer asks, ‘Do you have any questions?’
August 10, 2018, 9:00 AM EDT
One of the most important moments of a job interview comes just before the end, when the hiring manager asks, "Do you have any questions for me?"
According to bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch, how you respond to this question, "the finale of your job interview," can either make you a front-runner for the job or significantly hurt your chances.
While you may be tempted to ask a simple question — for instance, "What would a typical day be like for me?" — doing so won't help you stand out.
"Don't do it," she says. "It's so expected. It's not particularly thoughtful. And it's probably already been covered."
Make the most of that crucial last opportunity to shine. According to the leadership and career expert, the best questions to ask a hiring manager should accomplish these two things:
1. Show you've been listening
"This is your chance to show you were fully engaged," Welch says. "Focus in on an aspect of the job as it's been described."
To show you've been paying attention, ask a question that digs deeper into part of the job description they laid out for you.
A great example of this, Welch says, is something like, "Mary said part of my job would be interfacing with the operations team. I'd love to hear a little more about what that entails."
2. Show you think big
Next, demonstrate that you think "expansively" by asking a forward-looking question on an industry-related topic.
"Go up to 20,000 feet," Welch says, "and ask about the competition, the industry."
You can ask about a new product or feature the company just rolled out, or you can inquire about a trend that's impacting the sector, citing an article you recently read.
A good example of this, Welch says, is saying something like: "I just read an interesting article about how your competitors are using artificial intelligence. How are you thinking about that development?"
That type of question shows your potential boss you are already thinking about the company and how it works.
"Show in a positive way that you're excited about the future," Welch says, "and that a part of your brain is already there."
And while you're thinking about what to ask, remember there are also topics you should avoid. Under no circumstances should you bring up salary or benefits during the interview.
"That's for after you get the offer," says Welch.
This is an updated version of a post that appeared previously.
Video by Mary Stevens .
Suzy Welch is the co-founder of the Jack Welch Management Institute and a noted business journalist, TV commentator and public speaker. Think you need Suzy to fix your career? Email her at gettowork@cnbc.com.
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401(k) Mistakes to Avoid | 401ks | US News
401(k) Mistakes to Avoid
Those who understand the 401(k) rules can take care to minimize penalties and fees.
Fees and penalties for your 401(k) can often be avoided if you understand how your 401(k) plan works. You can also take advantage of employer contributions and tax breaks once you figure out how to qualify. Here's how to fix several common 401(k) problems.
A low default savings rate. Many employees are automatically enrolled in a 401(k) plan, typically at the default savings rate of 3 percent. But sticking with this low savings rate could be a mistake. "That 3 percent is not enough," says Shannon Nutter-Wiersbitzky, head of participant strategy and development at Vanguard. "If a younger person could start at the 12 percent rate, they are certainly going to benefit tremendously from the benefit of compounding over time." If you can't save that much at the beginning of your career, aim to increase contributions each year. "It's typical that you would start at potentially a lower percentage and then increase that over time," Nutter-Wiersbitzky says. "If you generally get your raise at the end of the year, set your 401(k) to automatically increase. You won't feel it as much in terms of what is being saved for you out of your pay."
[See: How to Max Out Your 401(k) in 2018.]
Missing out on the 401(k) match. Find out if your employer provides a 401(k) match, and make sure you save enough to qualify for the maximum possible match. One common 401(k) match formula is 50 cents per dollar saved up to 6 percent of pay. In this case you would need to save at least 6 percent of your salary in order to claim the full match. "A 401(k) match anywhere from 4 to 6 percent of pay is typical," says Gregg Levinson, a senior retirement consultant for Willis Towers Watson. "It might require 8 percent deferral [of your pay] to get the full 4 percent [match]."
Failing to maximize tax breaks. Workers defer paying income tax on the money they contribute to a traditional 401(k) plan. Participants can delay paying taxes on up to $18,500 in 2018. Those age 50 and older can make catch-up contributions of up to an additional $6,000. A 55-year-old in the 24 percent tax bracket could reduce his income tax bill by $5,880 if he maxes out his 401(k) plan. "There is a big tax advantage if you contribute to the max allowed," says Lavina Nagar, a certified financial planner and president of Maya Advisors in Palo Alto, California. "If you can stretch yourself and save the full $18,500, that is the ideal situation." Income tax won't be due on the money in your traditional 401(k) plan until it is distributed from the account.
Automatically accepting the default investment. Workers who are automatically enrolled in a 401(k) plan are invested in a default fund selected by the plan sponsor. The most common default investment is a target-date fund, which typically contains a mix of stocks, bonds and cash that grows more conservative over time. However, the fees, underlying investments and rate at which the fund grows more conservative won't be an ideal fit for all employees. Take a look at the other investment options in your 401(k) plan before sticking with a target-date fund.
Paying excessive 401(k) fees. While some 401(k) plans negotiate for low costs on behalf of their employees, others are riddled with expensive funds and excessive fees. However, you can move your money to lower cost funds within your 401(k) plan. Your 401(k) plan is required to send each participant an annual 401(k) fee disclosure statement that lists how much each fund in the 401(k) plan costs to own in a single chart. "There are disclosures that have to come with those investments that detail the fees," says John Scott, director of the The Pew Charitable Trust's retirement savings project. "You should be able to get that information from your human resources person or the plan service provider or the mutual fund provider." Check this document each year to see if there are lower cost funds in the 401(k) plan that will meet your investment needs.
[See: 9 Ways to Avoid 401(k) Fees and Penalties.]
Leaving the company before you are vested. You don't get to keep employer contributions to your 401(k) until you are vested in the account. Some 401(k) plans immediately vest company deposits, while others require several years of job tenure before you can keep any of the 401(k) match. There are also graduated vesting schedules that permit employees to keep a portion of the 401(k) match based on their years of service at the company, and some employers require five or six years on the job before employees qualify for the entire 401(k) match. "Vesting can be immediate or vesting can stretch over a period of time," Nagar says. "If you move you might leave something on the table, and that should be part of your negotiation for the new job."
Triggering the 401(k) early withdrawal penalty. Cashing out your 401(k) plan before age 59 1/2 (or in some cases age 55) will trigger a 10 percent early withdrawal penalty in addition to the income tax you will owe on the distribution. A $5,000 withdrawal at age 50 will result in a $500 early withdrawal penalty and another $1,200 in income tax for someone in the 24 percent tax bracket.
Initiating a 401(k) loan. If you need access to your savings before retirement, account owners are often allowed to take a 401(k) loan of as much as 50 percent of the vested account balance up to $50,000. The loan typically must be paid back with interest within five years. However, 401(k) loans charge a variety of fees and you miss out on the investment gains you could have earned in the account. "It should be a last resort because the interest isn't deductible and you're tapping into a retirement asset," says David Clarken, a certified financial planner for FWI Wealth Management in Atlanta, Georgia. If you leave your job, the loan balance must be paid back by the due date of your federal income tax return. Loans that aren't repaid on time are considered distributions, and taxes and penalties may apply.
Forgetting to take 401(k) distributions in retirement. 401(k) withdrawals are required after age 70 1/2. The penalty for missing a required distribution is 50 percent of the amount that should have been withdrawn. But you don't need to wait until age 70 to take retirement account distributions. Some retirees start withdrawals during their 60s, which allows you to space out the tax bill and in some cases pay a lower tax rate.
[See: How to Pay Less Taxes on Retirement Account Withdrawals.]
Ignoring old 401(k) plans. When you change jobs you can generally leave your retirement account balance in the 401(k) plan. You might want to maintain a 401(k) plan with a former employer if the plan has especially good investment options, low costs or contains company stock. However, if you have multiple 401(k) plans at several former employers you can simplify your financial life by consolidating accounts. Some workers open an IRA and roll their 401(k) balance into it each time they change jobs. Moving your money to an IRA maintains the tax benefits, while also giving you a wider range of investment options.
10 Tips for Rolling Over a 401(k) When You Change Jobs
1 of 12
(Getty Images)
Rollover options
Each time you change jobs you need to decide what to do with the money in your 401(k) plan. While you can typically leave the money in a former employer’s 401(k) plan, there’s also an opportunity to transfer your retirement savings to an individual retirement account or a new 401(k) plan. Here’s how to roll over your retirement savings when you leave a job.
Updated on May 16, 2018: This slideshow was originally published on Oct. 23, 2017, and has been updated with new information.
Maintain the tax benefits.
(Getty Images)
Maintain the tax benefits.
You can maintain the tax benefits of your 401(k) plan by rolling the account balance over to an IRA or transferring your savings to a new employer’s 401(k) if the plan allows it. However, there’s no need to make a quick decision. In most cases you can leave the money in a former employer’s 401(k) plan. Take some time to find another tax-deferred account that has the investment options you want at the best possible price.
Transfer your money directly.
(Getty Images)
Transfer your money directly.
If you decide to move your money, you can avoid taxes and penalties by having the account balance directly transferred to a new retirement account via a trustee-to-trustee transfer. If a check is made out to you, 20 percent will be withheld for income tax. If you don’t put the entire distribution, including the withheld 20 percent, in a new retirement account within 60 days you will owe income tax on that money. A 10 percent early withdrawal penalty could also apply if you are under age 55. A trustee-to-trustee transfer allows you to avoid the tax withholding and potential fees.
Find better investment options.
(Getty Images)
Find better investment options.
401(k) plans have a limited menu of funds, typically chosen by an employer, plan sponsor or consultant. While some 401(k) plans provide excellent investment options for participants, other 401(k) plans are riddled with overpriced funds and unnecessary fees. IRAs have a much wider selection of investment options. Take some time to shop around for the investments that make the most sense for your retirement portfolio. A job change can be an opportunity to move your money into better funds with lower fees.
Keep costs low.
(Getty Images)
Keep costs low.
Retirement accounts charge a variety of administrative and maintenance fees and each individual fund charges an expense ratio or fee to maintain the fund and perhaps other costs. However, it is increasingly possible to find retirement accounts and funds that charge very low fees. It’s especially important to choose low-cost funds for your retirement savings because you are investing over a long period of time and might pay those fees for several decades. Paying lower fees means you get to keep more of your investment returns.
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august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
Better Buy: Amazon (AMZN) vs. Shopify (SHOP)
Better Buy: Amazon (AMZN) vs. Shopify (SHOP)
August 13, 2018, 11:00 AM EDT
Perhaps you've heard: E-commerce is eating retail. One walk around your -- probably vacant -- megamall should be all the evidence you need. Or maybe a glance at the cardboard boxes piling up on your neighborhood's front stoops will convince you of the trend.
But as big as e-commerce has gotten, here's the scary part: it still accounts for 9.5% of all retail purchases in the United States. That means that there's still tons of room for growth. And the two companies facing off today are at the forefront of that movement: Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) and Shopify (NYSE: SHOP).
Mini orange shopping basket on a smart device and a laptop with boxes
Image source: Getty Images.
While one company (Amazon) has created an Everything Store for people to shop at and created a fulfillment network to deliver all those packages, the other (Shopify) has created a platform that allows anyone to start a business with an online presence -- including on Amazon itself.
Which is the better buy at today's prices? Let's evaluate the question looking through three different lenses.
Financial fortitude
The first thing we want to do is check and see how safe our investment would be if tough economic times hit unexpectedly. Companies with large war chests and healthy cash flows not only survive such downturns but can actually grow stronger as a result. Those that are in heavy debt are in the opposite boat -- forced to narrow their ambitions to just stay afloat.
Remembering that Amazon is a $900 billion behemoth while Shopify is valued at "just" $16 billion, here's how the two stack up.
Company
Cash
Debt
Free Cash Flow
Amazon
$28 billion
$25 billion
$8 billion
Shopify
$1.6 billion
$0
($20 million)
Data source: Yahoo! Finance. Cash includes short- and long-term investments. Free cash flow presented on trailing 12-month basis.
On the one hand, Shopify is in a very healthy position given its secondary offering was recently successful and it has absolutely no long-term debt. Until recently, Amazon was in a similar position, but the company shelled out billions to acquire Whole Foods.
That being said, I still believe Amazon is in the superior position. Not only does it have far superior cash flows, but if tough economic times hit, CEO Jeff Bezos could take his foot off of the reinvestment pedal and I believe free cash flow could explode -- albeit at the expense of long-term opportunities.
Shopify might be able to do the same, but because the company's Merchant Solutions division would likely suffer in a downturn as well, I'm not sure the effect would be as positive for the company's balance sheet.
Winner = Amazon
Next we have valuation. And I'll spill the beans from the outset: neither one of these companies is anywhere near "cheap" based on traditional metrics. In fact, they're downright expensive -- insanely expensive if you ask conservative investors.
Data source: Yahoo! Finance, E*Trade. P/E calculated using actual and estimated non-GAAP earnings where applicable.
The task, then, is to simply ask: Which stock is less insanely expensive? Based on every metric above, that is clearly Amazon.
It's not every day you'll see Amazon being viewed as the "cheaper" stock, but when lined up against Shopify, it earns the designation.
Winner = Amazon
Finally, we have sustainable competitive advantages. Because both of these companies have multiple moats, we'll evaluate how they stack up in terms of the four major sustainable competitive advantages.
The first moat can come from intangible assets -- in this case, the strength of a company's brand. Within the industry for creating an e-commerce platform for small to medium-sized businesses, Shopify has an excellent brand name. When compared to Amazon -- whose brand Forbes ranks as the world's fifth-most valuable at $71 billion -- however, Shopify has the short end of the stick.
The next major moat comes from high switching costs. This is right in Shopify's wheelhouse. Once a company begins using Shopify to meet its e-commerce needs, the pain associated with switching to another provider is enormous. Not only are there migration and coding costs, but businesses suffer downtime and have to retrain their entire workforce on a new operating system. That's what has helped Shopify keep revenue retention above 100% for every year it's been a public company. One could make an argument that switching away from Amazon Prime offers the company a moat -- but there are no real metrics to track this, and Shopify's lead on this front is significant.
Low-cost production is the next major moat, and here is where Amazon is the clear winner. Because the company has spent decades and billions of dollars building out its network of fulfillment centers, it can afford to guarantee two-day delivery at a fraction of the internal costs competitors would have to fork over. Shopify has no such meaningful advantages.
Finally, there's the network effect. This moat comes into play when each additional user of a service makes the service more valuable. Both Amazon and Shopify benefit. For Amazon, the site has become such a popular destination for shoppers that third-party merchants are incentivized to list their wares on the site and use Fulfillment by Amazon for shipping. Revenue for third-party services grew 36% last quarter.
Shopify's network effect comes from the fact that third-party app developers look at Shopify's 600,000 merchants as a huge pool of potential customers. As more apps are developed for Shopify's platform, the tools attract ever more merchants -- a virtuous cycle.
Put it all together and you can see that while both companies have strong moats, Amazon comes out ahead.
Winner = Amazon
So there you have it: Amazon is cheaper, has a better balance sheet, and has a wider moat than Shopify. Don't let that stop you, however, from considering Shopify as well for your portfolio. I already have outperform ratings for both companies on my CAPS profile, and together, they account for 29% of my real-life holdings. While I clearly think Amazon is a better bet, they both deserve your consideration.
More From The Motley Fool
John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Brian Stoffel owns shares of Amazon and Shopify. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Amazon and Shopify. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.
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Applying to College: A Step by Step Guide to the Application
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august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
The $250 Biohack That’s Revolutionizing Life With Diabetes - Bloomberg
The $250 Biohack That’s Revolutionizing Life With Diabetes
DIYers used a security flaw to bypass the $8.3 billion insulin delivery business with a cobbled-together artificial pancreas.
More stories by Naomi Kresge
August 8, 2018, 5:00 AM EDT
When her daughter, Sydney, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 8, Kate Farnsworth stopped sleeping through the night. She’d set the alarm for 3 a.m. so she or her husband, Dave, could prick the girl’s fingers and check her blood sugar. If the results were worrisome, they’d adjust her insulin and keep checking every 15 minutes. At 6 a.m., another alarm went off to signal the next insulin dose, but by then, Kate had usually snapped awake again already. When Sydney got home from school each afternoon, Kate was there to check her glucose level. “Diabetes is one of the only diseases where you’re sent a prescription and have to adjust the dosage on your own” forever, Kate says. For Sydney, the biggest worry was “how I wouldn’t ever be normal again.”
Two exhausting years in, Kate found the beginnings of an alternative in an online forum. A loose confederation of do-it-yourselfers were working on a system that would eventually help link an insulin pump to a glucose monitor and connect both to a smartphone app. The idea was that the wearer—or her parents—could track and adjust her blood sugar, in person or from afar. That would mean fewer pinpricks, and far fewer alarms, because her blood sugar would stay out of the danger zone. Most of the time, the contraption would be able to regulate the wearer’s insulin itself.
Sydney Farnsworth (left) and her mother, Kate.
Photographer: Mark Sommerfeld for Bloomberg Businessweek
Two long years after that, Kate, a graphic artist in the Toronto suburbs, was able to follow the community’s step-by-step instructions and build her daughter what amounted to an artificial pancreas, the organ that regulates blood sugar. Suddenly, the Farnsworths could take a breath. Sydney, now 15, is still using an updated version of that DIY system, which, because a fellow DIYer donated the pump, cost only $250 to make. “I’m really happy with where I am now,” she says. “It’s so simple to just click a button and give insulin while I’m on my phone.” The app she uses, connected to a sensor under her skin, keeps monitoring her whether she’s sleeping, taking a math quiz, or doing jumps on her snowboard. “It has totally changed the way we manage diabetes,” Kate Farnsworth says.
Twenty years ago, internet utopians envisioned scientific innovation gradually becoming more open-source. Instead, most amateur “biohacking” has remained fringe-y and often focused on aesthetics—inserting lights under the skin as a fashion statement, for example. But like the prosthetic arm a teenager built himself out of Legos, the device keeping Sydney alive is a rare example of the idea working out, at least in microcosm. By some estimates, as many as 2,000 people around the world have used a home-built pancreas, cobbled together mostly via social media and the free-code clearinghouse GitHub. Tech support consists of parents and patients who use Facebook Messenger or email to help newcomers fix bugs or revive busted equipment. There are plenty of potential converts: In the U.S. alone, about 1.3 million people have Type 1 diabetes, and there are indications the technology could also help some sufferers of Type 2, the group that accounts for most of the world’s 422 million diabetes cases.
Although no users have reported a disastrous malfunction, trusting your life (or your child’s) to a DIY pancreas carries obvious risks. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is years away from approving a comparably flexible and automated rig for sale. “You’ve got a group that is circumventing all of the controls that are in place,” says Hooman Hakami, president of the diabetes group at Medtronic Plc, the leader in the $8.3 billion market for old-school diabetes devices. “I can show you what a few of our engineers have put together over a weekend, and it would blow you away. But we don’t call that a finished product. We call that a prototype.”
So far, though, the rough-and-tumble version is way ahead of the market. Apple Inc. and Eli Lilly & Co. have hired DIYers, and Medtronic’s latest FDA-approved product can now do most of the things the Farnsworths’ system can—for $7,000, before insurance. It’s not hard to understand why diabetics and their loved ones might opt for the Farnsworth model, says Courtney Lias, who oversees chemistry and toxicology devices at the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “You can do everything on your phone except manage diabetes,” Lias says. “You should be able to do that, too.”
The DIY pancreas movement would never have happened if not for a Medtronic blunder. In 2011 a pair of security researchers alerted the public that the wireless radio frequency links in some of the company’s best-selling insulin pumps had been left open to hackers. Medtronic closed the loophole after the researchers warned of risks to patients, but it never recalled the devices, leaving thousands in circulation.
By then, Ben West, a programmer and diabetes patient in San Francisco, had decided to hack the pump. “This is not what I wanted,” he says. “This is all a last-ditch effort.” He says he’d been careful to use his existing pump as directed but still wound up in the hospital more than once when his blood sugar veered dangerously high or low. He despised needing to retreat to the corner of a party to prick his finger and test his blood sugar, and he couldn’t stand how his pump itched and came unstuck during yoga.
The Artificial Pancreas
Source: Loop Docs
Working evenings, weekends, and vacations for five years, West reverse-engineered the pump’s communications code, making it possible to send the device instructions. During that time, a group of DIYers calling themselves Nightscout figured out how to relay data from glucose monitors to a smartphone or watch, so parents could monitor kids’ blood sugar levels remotely. Theirs were the instructions Kate Farnsworth followed to build a homemade wireless link for Sydney’s glucose monitor and do the coding needed to create a custom display for the Pebble, an early smartwatch. Kate could then watch Sydney’s blood sugar move on her watch in real time during the day, texting her daughter if she saw any irregularities. And Sydney could watch her blood sugar move without drawing attention to herself in class.
In June 2014, West met Seattle couple Dana Lewis and Scott Leibrand, who had written an algorithm that could suggest insulin doses. The next step, they decided, was to automate the insulin pump using software. The three traded ideas on GitHub and at the Twitter office where Leibrand worked. By December, Lewis, who has diabetes, had hooked up her new artificial pancreas. At first, she intended to use it only while she slept, but it left her so well-rested that she kept it on during the day. “It has constantly surpassed my expectations,” she says.
West, Lewis, and Leibrand posted their work in early 2015. It was intimidating for nonprogrammers such as Kate Farnsworth to try to replicate, but when DIY coder Nate Racklyeft created Loop, a more user-friendly version for the iPhone, Farnsworth decided to try it out. Yet another DIYer gave her an old, hackable Medtronic pump, which she connected to a glucose monitor and the app using a tiny Bluetooth-equipped computer called a RileyLink. It was designed by Minnesotan DIYer Pete Schwamb, whose daughter, Riley, has diabetes.
In 2016, with the components spread out on the desk in her home office, Farnsworth decided to test the system with water and without Sydney, by then 13, attached. She filled the pump and aimed its tube into a napkin, watching it spit out tiny jets of faux insulin as the app showed her daughter’s blood sugar rise and fall. “I could see the logic of it,” she says. After two days, she was satisfied everything worked properly, and on a weekend when the family had no other plans, they tried it out for real. “That was the first night I slept through the night in years,” she says.
Kate applies the glucose monitor to Sydney.
Photographer: Mark Sommerfeld for Bloomberg Businessweek
Farnsworth set up a Facebook group called Looped to help other parents follow her lead. Today it has more than 4,000 members, and Farnsworth spends several hours a day answering messages from curious parents. “They know their kids the best,” she says, “and sometimes technology or medicine is slower and doesn’t know what we need as much as we do.” Loop volunteers have shipped about 2,000 RileyLinks, built by a Kentucky company that mostly makes parts for electric guitars, as far away as China and Sierra Leone.
Nightscout, the DIY group, has grown from five families in April 2014 to some 55,000 people in 33 countries. A European team recently created an app for Android phones and cracked the code in a popular pump from Roche Holding AG. About 50 people signed up for the Android system last month, says developer Milos Kozak.
On a warm weekend in late May, Kozak hosted about 20 DIYers from around Europe in Prague. Accustomed to conversing via Gitter, a chat platform for open-source coders, it was the first time many had met in person. The youngest of the group was 15-year-old Tebbe Ubben, who’d helped build his own artificial pancreas and had traveled by train from rural Germany. “If I can showcase something that results in a manufactured product changing, that’s exactly what I want,” says Jon Hudson, a U.K. software engineer who helped Ubben with his rig.
At least one big device maker has given up on the artificial pancreas. Johnson & Johnson shut down its project last year, saying it could no longer charge enough for its hardware to make further research and development worth its while. Despite shrinking profit margins, however, the DIY projects have helped stir industry … [more]
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august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
These 5 tech stocks are in a dot-com-like bubble (and they aren’t all FAANGs) - MarketWatch
These 5 tech stocks are in a dot-com-like bubble (and they aren’t all FAANGs)
Getty Images
Spot the micro bubbles.
Although the overall stock market looks reasonably valued, there are pockets of extraordinary risk where stocks with 2000-bubble-like valuations lurk.
Specifically, there is a “micro bubble” in certain tech stocks, where valuations reflect expectations for future cash flows that would require unrealistically high margins, growth, and market share. These expectations might not be so “bubbly” if not for the fact that the current margins and cash flows of these companies have trended at very low or negative levels for years.
5 tech stocks in a micro bubble
Figure 1 lists the five tech stocks we put in our first micro bubble. They share a few key characteristics:
• Low or negative return on invested capital (ROIC) and free cash flow
• Unrealistically high valuations: all 10 companies either have negative economic book values, or they have a PEBV above 20
• Expectations that they achieve heretofore unseen dominant market shares
These are five of the largest micro-bubble companies. Briefly, here’s what makes each of these companies part of the micro-bubble.
Amazon
Fun fact: Amazon’s AMZN, +0.20% $885 billion market cap is higher than Walmart WMT, +0.45% Home Depot HD, +0.69% Oracle ORCL, -0.39% and Disney DIS, +0.53% combined. Investors are betting that Amazon can grow to dominate multiple industries while earning significantly higher margins than it does now.
Amazon has finally shown an ability to earn a profit, but it still must grow net operating profit after tax (NOPAT) by 30% compounded annually for 19 years to justify its current valuation. See the math behind this dynamic DCF scenario. For comparison, only six companies in the S&P 500 SPX, +0.28% managed to grow NOPAT by 30% compounded annually for just the past 10 years. Maintaining that growth rate for nearly double that time frame would be an extraordinary feat.
Amazon prefers to point investors to free cash flow, but its reported free cash flow numbers are an illusion. In reality, the company continues to experience significant cash outflows.
Investors who focus on understanding true cash flow and fundamentals know the disconnect between actual cash flow and the market’s expectations for future cash flows borders on the absurd.
Netflix
Netflix NFLX, +0.16% has become one of the leading creators of original content, but it’s done so with an unsustainable cost structure. As this excellent video from The Ringer explains, Netflix earns an accounting profit, but only because its reported content costs understate its actual content spending by about 50%. The company continues to lose billions of dollars a year and grows increasingly dependent on the high-yield debt market.
Felix Salmon of Slate recently published a piece titled “Netflix Can Either Become the Dominant Media Monopoly of the 21st Century or Go Bust.” The market values Netflix as if it will be that dominant monopoly when, frankly, there’s a very good chance it goes bust. Risk/reward for this stock is so bad that no investor with any respect for fundamentals can own this stock in good conscience.
Salesforce.com
Salesforce CRM, +1.21% has racked up losses for years while pursuing growth at any cost. The theory behind this strategy is that the company will eventually be able to cut back heavily on its marketing and R&D costs while maintaining its recurring revenue stream.
Even if this strategy does work, which is far from certain, the company is currently valued at 10 times revenue, or double the valuation of Oracle. This hasn’t dissuaded bulls, as Salesforce generates classic tech bubble-style headlines like “Ignore Salesforce’s Valuation.” In other words, they want investors to ignore fundamentals.
Tesla
Tesla TSLA, -1.09% currently has a higher market cap than GM GM, -0.05% despite selling about 1% as many cars in 2017. What’s more, GM is already ahead of Tesla in self-driving technology and rapidly catching up when it comes to electric vehicle production.
Elon Musk keeps promising that Tesla will revolutionize the auto industry, but so far Tesla hasn’t shown an ability to navigate the manufacturing logistics that the established auto makers figured out decades ago. The company’s valuation is blind to fundamentals and seems entirely focused on the cult of personality that has built up around Musk.
Read: Tesla confirms intention to go private, sending stock up 11%
Spotify
Spotify Technology SPOT, -0.24% wants to disrupt the music industry, but so far it remains beholden to the Big Three record labels that own 85% of the music streamed on its platform. The market thinks of Spotify as a trendy tech company, but as we wrote in our report on the stock, the economics of its business are more similar to the movie theater industry.
Spotify’s leverage against the record labels is further weakened by the rapid growth of competitors like Apple Music AAPL, -0.08% It’s hard to see how Spotify can justify the growth expectations implied by its valuation unless it could pull off the unlikely feat of taking over ownership of its content from the labels while holding off competition from other streaming services (all without having to overspend like Netflix has).
Again, we see a company where the valuation reflects the best-case scenario with little to no tether to fundamentals.
How to bet against the micro bubble
Investors that want to bet against these micro-bubble stocks can short them directly, but that can be expensive and risky for these momentum-driven companies. As the saying goes, the market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent.
Another way to profit from the busting of this micro bubble is to invest in the incumbents from which these companies must take major chunks of market share. When these micro-bubble stocks fall back to earth, a great deal of capital should be reallocated to the incumbents.
Macro bubbles vs. micro bubbles
Today’s market has some micro bubbles, or smaller groups of overhyped stocks trading at ridiculous valuations.That makes it very different from the tech bubble, which was a macro bubble, a marketwide phenomenon that distorted the valuation of the entire market.
A few new features are shaping the market now and explain why today’s bubbles are unlikely to spread to the entire market, at least for the foreseeable future:
• Politicians and policy makers are focused on preventing macro market crashes. Today’s politicians and policy makers are heavily shaped by both the housing bubble of the mid-2000s and the tech bubble of the late 1990s. They will likely do everything in their power to prevent recurrence of such cataclysmic events on their watch.
• Rising influence of noise traders. Noise traders, who make investment decisions based on noise and have no regard for fundamentals, are an increasingly influential force in today’s market. Roughly a quarter of all U.S. adults with internet access are retail online traders. That’s around 50 million investors who don’t have professional trading (much less investing) experience and might be more susceptible to buying into “story” stocks without understanding the fundamentals. There’s power in those numbers.
• Overhyping “transformative” technology. The splintering of online media has led journalists to overhype nearly every new technology and trend in a relentless competition for clicks. For example, despite the “Retail Apocalypse” narrative, brick-and-mortar sales still account for 90% of retail sales, and Walmart earned nearly three times more revenue than Amazon last year. In reality, very few new technologies are as transformative as we like to imagine.
• Value transfer vs. value creation. Too many investors overestimate the value-creation opportunities for new technologies. Even when technologies are transformative, predicting who will reap the benefits of these technologies is difficult. Often, most of the value accrues to end users/consumers and not corporations. When it does accrue to a company, it’s usually at the expense of another company. During the tech bubble, bulls believed the internet would make our economy radically more productive and allow the GDP growth rate of around 5% in the late 90’s to persist for many years. When this utopian future failed to materialize, the market collapsed. By contrast, today’s micro-bubble companies compete against firmly established incumbents from which they must take large chunks of market share to survive. Instead of adding value, these companies aim to take value from existing players. Even if they succeed, we think much of that value will eventually pass to consumers.
This last point is key. In 1999, investors gave Microsoft MSFT, -0.10% its absurdly high valuation because they believed its software would create enormous amounts of value and growth for thousands of other companies. On the other hand, Tesla’s sky-high valuation implies it will take market share away from General Motors and Ford F, +0.50% which decreases the valuation of those companies.
These modern-day micro bubbles reflect the zero-sum nature of today’s crowded and more mature competitive landscapes.
Why we’re not in a macro bubble
Figure 2 sums up the difference between the tech bubble and today’s market pretty clearly. It shows the price to economic book value (PEBV) of the largest 1,000 U.S. stocks by market cap going back to 2000. PEBV compares the current valuation of a company compared to the zero-growth value of its cash flows, i.e. NOPAT, so a higher PEBV means the market expects more future cash flow growth.
While the market’s PEBV has more than doubled since 2012, from 0.7 to 1.5, it’s nowhere close to its tech bubble level of 5.7.
There are definitely some outrageously valued companies out there, but those high valuations … [more]
If  it  is  something  urgent_  after  you  send  me  the  details  by  email_  please  contact  text.  These  5  tech  stocks  are  in  a  dot-com-like  bubble  (and  they  aren’t  all  FAANGs)  -  MarketWatch  Amazon  AMZN  Netflix  NFLX  Crm  salesForce  Spotify  Tesla  TSLA  dotComLike 
august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
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If  it  is  something  urgent_  after  you  send  me  the  details  by  email_  please  contact  text.  Fwd:  How  to  make  your  iPhone  videos  look  like  Hollywood  movies 
august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
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