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neerajsinghvns : why   27

Why Amazon will triple to $5,000 a share, according to the this hedge fund manager - MarketWatch
MarketWatch
Our call of the day, from Doug Kass, president of Seabreeze Partners Management, who predicts Amazon shares, currently at $1,818, could more than triple in a few years. Read the full story
Shared from Apple News
Why  Amazon  will  triple  to  $5_000  a  share_  according  the  this  hedge  fund  manager  -  MarketWatch  AMZN  needsEditing  Interesting  Reading  InterestingReading  Komal  Neha  Sonu  &  Neeraj 
15 days ago by neerajsinghvns
Popular Science: Why measles is back, in five charts
Popular Science
Too many people have forgotten what it’s like to live in a time where everyone got the measles. Read the full story
Shared from Apple News
Popular  Science  :  Why  measles  is  back_  in  five  charts  popSci  vaccine  vaccines  vaccination  vaccinations 
11 weeks ago by neerajsinghvns
How It's Made - Onions (Gills' Onions) - YouTube
03:15; why cut onions smell bad after sitting for a while ; bacteria growth
why  cut  onions  smell  bad  after  sitting  for  a  while  ;  bacteria  growth  needsEditing 
january 2019 by neerajsinghvns
How a Plumbing Trap Can Lose Water - YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2o8upCxcqA ;;;
tags: How a Plumbing Trap Can Lose Water - YouTube video thisOldHouse a washing machine can cause surrounding p trap traps p-trap p-traps to lose water needsEditing;;;
How  a  Plumbing  Trap  Can  Lose  Water  -  YouTube  video  thisOldHouse  washing  machine  cause  surrounding  p  traps  p-trap  p-traps  to  needsEditing  why  vent  is  needed  in  pipe  pipes  line  lines  howTo 
january 2019 by neerajsinghvns
<img height=""> »
https://html.com/attributes/img-height/
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tags: html css img image height width why HowTo ;;;
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Search = "annoying, glitchy page jump when the other elements on the page move to accommodate each image as it loads"
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Why indicate the height?
Typically, with modern web design layout, you do not specify the height of an image or other element. The rendered, display height is a result of the width. (Hence the prevalent use of height: auto; in CSS layouts). For example, given an image with an intrinsic size of 200 px by 100 px (2:1 aspect ratio), if the rendered width is 150px, the rendered height will be 75%. Why does this matter? The browser doesn't know what the intrinsic size of an image is until it has downloaded and inspected it. So, until that happens, it doesn't know how much space to allot to it on page. Depending on the way the layout is structured, it can often (not always) figure out the width, but it won't be able to figure out the rendered height without information on the image's actual proportions. This causes an annoying, glitchy page jump when the other elements on the page move to accommodate each image as it loads. On a page with a lot of images, this can be a real problem. The simple solution is to include information about an image's height and width in the markup. You still need to specify the display size in the CSS, but providing information about the file will help browsers render the page faster and more accurately.

.img-full { max-width: 100%; height: auto; }
<img src="/wp-content/uploads/very-large-flamingo.jpg" width="1280" height="850">


Read more: https://html.com/attributes/img-height/#ixzz5UwrZRvPJ
html  css  img  image  height  width  why  HowTo 
october 2018 by neerajsinghvns
The Bailouts For The Rich Are Why America Is So Screwed Right Now | Zero Hedge
The Bailouts For The Rich Are Why America Is So Screwed Right Now
Authored by Matt Stoller via Vice.com,
Did they prevent a full-scale collapse? Yes. Was it necessary to do it the way we did? Not at all.
These guys got off pretty easy. (Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)
In 1948, the architect of the post-war American suburb, William Levitt, explained the point of the housing finance system. "No man who owns his own house and lot can be a Communist," he said. "He has too much to do."
It’s worth reflecting on this quote on the ten-year anniversary of the financial crisis, because it speaks to how the architects of the bailouts shaped our culture. Tim Geithner, Ben Bernanke, and Hank Paulson, the three key men in charge, basically argue that the bailouts they executed between 2007 and 2009 were unfair, but necessary to preserve stability. It’s time to ask, though: just what stability did they preserve?
These three men paint the financial crisis largely as a technical one. But let’s not get lost in the fancy terms they use, like “normalization of credit flows," in discussing what happened and why. The excessively wonky tone is intentional - it's intended to hide the politics of what happened. So let’s look at what the bailouts actually were, in normal human language.
The official response to the financial crisis ended a 75-year-old American policy of pursuing broad homeownership as a social goal. Since at least Franklin Delano Roosevelt, American leaders had deliberately organized the financial system to put more people in their own homes. In 2011, the Obama administration changed this policy, pushing renting over owning. The CEO of Bank of America, Brian Moynihan, echoed this view shortly thereafter. There are many reasons for the change, and not all of them were bad. But what’s important to understand is that the financial crisis was a full-scale assault on the longstanding social contract linking Americans with the financial system through their house.
The way Geithner orchestrated this was through a two-tiered series of policy choices. During the crisis, everyone needed money from the government, but Geithner offered money to the big guy, and not the little guy.
First, he found mechanisms, all of them very technical—and well-reported in Adam Tooze’s new book Crashed—to throw unlimited amounts of credit at institutions controlled by financial executives in the United States and Europe. (Eric Holder, meanwhile, also de facto granted legal amnesty to executives for possible securities fraud associated with the crisis.)
Second, Geithner chose to deny money and credit to the middle class in the midst of a foreclosure crisis. The Obama administration supported this by neutering laws against illegal foreclosures.
The response to the financial crisis was about reorganizing property rights. If you were close to power, you enjoyed unlimited rights and no responsibilities, and if you were far from power, you got screwed. This shaped the world into what it is today. As Levitt pointed out, when people have no stake in the system, they get radical.
Did this prevent a full-scale collapse? Yes. Was it necessary to do it the way we did? Not at all.
Geithner, Bernanke, and Paulson like to pretend that bank bailouts are inherently unpopular—that they were wise stewards resisting toxic (populist) political headwinds. But it’s not that simple. Unfair bank bailouts are unpopular, but reasonable ones are not. For an alternative, look at how a previous generation of Democrats handled a similar, though much more serious, crisis.
In 1933, when FDR took power, global banking was essentially non-functional. Bankers had committed widespread fraud on top of a rickety and poorly structured financial system. Herbert Hoover, who organized an initial bailout by establishing what was known as the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, was widely mocked for secretly sending money to Republican bankers rather than ordinary people. The new administration realized that trust in the system was essential.
One of the first things Roosevelt did, even before he took office, was to embarrass powerful financiers. He did this by encouraging the Senate Banking Committee to continue its probe, under investigator Ferdinand Pecora, of the most powerful institutions on Wall Street, which were National City (now Citibank) and JP Morgan. Pecora exposed these institutions as nests of corruption. The Senate Banking Committee made public Morgan’s "preferred list," which was the group of powerful and famous people who essentially got bribes from Morgan. It included the most important men in the country, like former Republican President Calvin Coolidge, a Supreme Court Justice, important CEOs and military leaders, and important Democrats, too.
Roosevelt also ordered his attorney general "vigorously to prosecute any violations of the law" that emerged from the investigations. New Dealers felt that "if the people become convinced that the big violators are to be punished it will be helpful in restoring confidence." The DOJ indicted National City’s Charles Mitchell for tax evasion. This was part of a series of aggressive attacks on the old order of corrupt political and economic elites. The administration pursued these cases, often losing the criminal complaints but continuing with civil charges. This bought the Democrats the trust of the public.
When Roosevelt engaged in his own broad series of bank bailouts, the people rewarded his party with overwhelming gains in the midterm elections of 1934 and a resounding re-election in 1936. Along with an assertive populist Congress, the new administration used the bailout money in the RFC to implement mass foreclosure-mitigation programs, create deposit insurance, and put millions of people to work. He sought to save not the bankers but the savings of the people themselves.
Democrats did more than save the economy - they also restructured it along democratic lines. They passed laws to break up banks, the emerging airline industry, and electric utilities. The administration engaged in an aggressive antitrust campaign against industrial monopolists. And Roosevelt restructured the Federal Reserve so that the central bank was not "independent" but set interest rates entirely subservient to the wishes of elected officials.
In 1938, Franklin Delano Roosevelt offered his view on what causes democracies to fail.
"History proves that dictatorships do not grow out of strong and successful governments," he said, "but out of weak and helpless ones."
Did the bailouts of ten years ago work? It’s a good question. I don’t see a strong and vibrant democracy in America right now. Do you?
Please click on "Reply All" when replying to this email.
Thank you,
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The  Bailouts  For  The  Rich  Are  Why  America  Is  So  Screwed  Right  Now  needsEditing  2007  2008  2009  economy  depression  questionable 
october 2018 by neerajsinghvns
Why do flight attendants dislike flying to and from India? Quora has the answers — Quartz India
The dreaded destination: why foreign flight attendants dislike travelling to and from India
Maria ThomasSeptember 9, 2016
Reuters/Krishnendu Halder
In-flight entertainment.
Indians have a really bad reputation when it comes to air travel.
So much so that when an Emirates flight from the southern state of Kerala made a hard landing in Dubai last month, an ex-flight attendant had no qualms referring to the panicked passengers as “fucking rats” and an “untameable bunch” as videos emerged of them rushing to grab their belongings in the midst of the emergency.
The post was slammed for its racist and insensitive undertones. But for frequent flyers from India, disgruntled or even disgusted flight attendants are nothing new. What’s behind the negative attitude? Quora has the answers.
Not used to the jet-set life
Many Indian passengers who take flights, notably to the Middle East, are first-time travellers from socio-economic classes that have little exposure to the jet-set life.
As Quora user Maazin Buhari puts it,
“A lot of the time, (on flights to the Middle East especially), the passengers on board these flights will be migrant workers who are travelling to earn a livelihood in the city they are flying to. Often they are of a lower socio-economic background, will be carrying all or a significant amount of their possessions with them, and are not used to frequent air travel.”
That explains the rush to grab belongings as soon as the flight lands, despite instructions to stay seated until the seatbelt sign is switched off.
Often, these passengers aren’t used to the in-flight behavioral norms that are mostly western. Quora user Sri Ka notes:
“For example, practically no Indian uses cutlery at home—they eat with their fingers—but the flights are not suitable for such a lifestyle as they are not designed with sufficient hand-wash facilities so one is forced awkwardly to eat with cutlery, that too the plastic ones. It is quite difficult. Similarly, the toilets in the flights are nowhere near like the toilets in Indian homes and many Indians, particularly first-timers, do not even know how to use paper instead of water. When people are forced to do something unnatural for them, they are likely to fumble and make a mess.”
But it’s also about civic sense
The first-timers can and should be forgiven but even among regular travellers, inconsiderate behaviour is common.
Supreeth Shankarghal, who describes himself as a frequent flier and aviation enthusiast, lists some of the worst offenses Indians are known for:
Being adamant about placing their overweight hand baggage in the overhead bin of only their preference.
Stealing cutlery.
Stealing headphones and blankets.
Not switching off the phone during take-offs or landings despite warnings.
Taking selfies and pictures inside the flight when asked not to do so.
Not making way or getting up from the seat for fellow passengers.
Reclining the seat even during take-offs and landings.
Not speaking proper English.
Ogling at air hostesses and other female passengers.
Moving up and down the aircraft many times.
Requesting for unnecessary seat changes.
Getting up and going to the toilet when seatbelt sign is on.
Removing seat-belts and getting up to remove overhead baggage when the aircraft is still taxiing.
Over-abuse of free alcohol served on board.
While it is a bit unfair to refer to poor English skills as inconsiderate behaviour, the consumption of a copious amount of alcohol does seem to be a big problem. For some passengers, the chance to gulp down one whisky after another during international flights proves irresistible and untoward incidents ensue.
Entitled passengers are the worst
But despite all of the above, it’s the rude and entitled regular travelers that pose the biggest problem with their assumption that the cabin crew exists to serve them and them alone.
Flight attendant and Quora user Buzzlair Voufincci noted that some travellers are quick to claim a higher status on every flight.
“They would explicitly say to the flight attendant, ‘I am a doctor’ to get treatment above all the others on board,” he wrote, adding that some even said things like “I know your CEO personally” or even “I pay for the seat, and the compartment above me, it’s my space.”
For Voufincci, it’s India’s “huge income gap” that leads to this “inflated ego.”
Some responses have been mildly edited for grammar.
Please click on "Reply All" when replying to this email.
Thank you,
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The  dreaded  destination:  why  foreign  flight  attendants  dislike  travelling  to  and  from  India  needsEditing  questionable 
october 2018 by neerajsinghvns
YouTube
tags: Why 3 Phase electric Power ? Why not 6 or 12 ? needsEditing DBS
Why  3  Phase  electric  Power  ?  not  6  or  12  needsEditing  DBS  edisonTechCenter  Lionel  Barthold 
august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
Why Denmark is the Happiest Country - YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eKa-3lbLeyA ;;;
tags: Why Denmark is the Happiest Country - YouTube | video interesting reading interestingReading ;;;
Why  Denmark  is  the  Happiest  Country  -  YouTube  |  video  interesting  reading  interestingReading 
august 2018 by neerajsinghvns
(9) Why do mirrors flip horizontally (but not vertically)? - YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBpxhfBlVLU ;;;
tags: Why do mirrors flip horizontally (but not vertically)? - YouTube | video komal neha sonu ;;;
Why  do  mirrors  flip  horizontally  (but  not  vertically)?  -  YouTube  |  video  komal  neha  sonu 
february 2018 by neerajsinghvns
Webtimeclock | Learning
https://webtimeclock.com/learn ;;;
tags: Webtimeclock | Learning version3 ; howto why videos ;;;
Webtimeclock  |  Learning  version3  ;  howto  why  videos 
january 2018 by neerajsinghvns
For the Love of Physics (Walter Lewin's Last Lecture) - YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4a0FbQdH3dY;;;
tags: For the Love of Physics Lewin's Last Lecture ) - YouTube | video komal neha sonu ;; Why is sky blue but cloud clouds white ? ( professor prof Walter Lewin mit ;;;
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18:40; Conservation of Energy; Potential Energy to Kinetic and back.
22:00; Pendulum;
23:00; Demolition of buildings;
23:30; Glass Plate Breaking;
25:05; Professor Walter Lewin's chin not breaking.
27:55; Light scattering.
35:00; Why is the sky blue, but cloud clouds white? Final explaination.
For  the  Love  of  Physics  Lewin's  Last  Lecture  )  -  YouTube  |  video  komal  neha  sonu  ;;  Why  is  sky  blue  but  cloud  clouds  white  ?  (  professor  prof  Walter  Lewin  mit 
december 2017 by neerajsinghvns
None
http://engineering.mit.edu/live/news/305-why-do-plastics-get-brittle-when-they-get-cold;;;
Why do plastics get brittle when they get cold?
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A key factor in the molecules’ ability to slip and slide is temperature. Specifically, there is something called the “glass transition temperature” (Tg), which is the point below which an amorphous solid (such as glass, polymers, tire rubber, or cotton candy) goes from being ductile to brittle. For most common materials, says Rutledge, this temperature is so high or so low that it is not easily observed - the Tg of window glass is 564 degrees C, and that of tire rubber is -72 degrees C.
solid  amorphous  Tg  glass  transition  temperature  why  do  plastics  brittle  when  they  get  cold 
april 2013 by neerajsinghvns

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