recentpopularlog in

nhaliday : nibble   1552

« earlier  
exponential function - Feynman's Trick for Approximating $e^x$ - Mathematics Stack Exchange
1. e^2.3 ~ 10
2. e^.7 ~ 2
3. e^x ~ 1+x
e = 2.71828...

errors (absolute, relative):
1. +0.0258, 0.26%
2. -0.0138, -0.68%
3. 1 + x approximates e^x on [-.3, .3] with absolute error < .05, and relative error < 5.6% (3.7% for [0, .3]).
nibble  q-n-a  overflow  math  feynman  giants  mental-math  calculation  multiplicative  AMT  identity  objektbuch  explanation  howto  estimate  street-fighting  stories  approximation  data  trivia  nitty-gritty 
october 2019 by nhaliday
Is there a common method for detecting the convergence of the Gibbs sampler and the expectation-maximization algorithm? - Quora
In practice and theory it is much easier to diagnose convergence in EM (vanilla or variational) than in any MCMC algorithm (including Gibbs sampling).

https://www.quora.com/How-can-you-determine-if-your-Gibbs-sampler-has-converged
There is a special case when you can actually obtain the stationary distribution, and be sure that you did! If your markov chain consists of a discrete state space, then take the first time that a state repeats in your chain: if you randomly sample an element between the repeating states (but only including one of the endpoints) you will have a sample from your true distribution.

One can achieve this 'exact MCMC sampling' more generally by using the coupling from the past algorithm (Coupling from the past).

Otherwise, there is no rigorous statistical test for convergence. It may be possible to obtain a theoretical bound for the convergence rates: but these are quite difficult to obtain, and quite often too large to be of practical use. For example, even for the simple case of using the Metropolis algorithm for sampling from a two-dimensional uniform distribution, the best convergence rate upper bound achieved, by Persi Diaconis, was something with an astronomical constant factor like 10^300.

In fact, it is fair to say that for most high dimensional problems, we have really no idea whether Gibbs sampling ever comes close to converging, but the best we can do is use some simple diagnostics to detect the most obvious failures.
nibble  q-n-a  qra  acm  stats  probability  limits  convergence  distribution  sampling  markov  monte-carlo  ML-MAP-E  checking  equilibrium  stylized-facts  gelman  levers  mixing  empirical  plots  manifolds  multi  fixed-point  iteration-recursion  heuristic  expert-experience  theory-practice  project 
october 2019 by nhaliday
online resources - How to write special set notation by hand? - Mathematics Stack Exchange
Your ℕN is “incorrect” in that a capital N in any serif font has the diagonal thickened, not the verticals. In fact, the rule (in Latin alphabet) is that negative slopes are thick, positive ones are thin. Verticals are sometimes thin, sometimes thick. Unique exception: Z. Just look in a newspaper at A, V, X, M, and N.
nibble  q-n-a  overflow  math  writing  notetaking  howto  pic  notation  trivia 
october 2019 by nhaliday
Shuffling - Wikipedia
The Gilbert–Shannon–Reeds model provides a mathematical model of the random outcomes of riffling, that has been shown experimentally to be a good fit to human shuffling[2] and that forms the basis for a recommendation that card decks be riffled seven times in order to randomize them thoroughly.[3] Later, mathematicians Lloyd M. Trefethen and Lloyd N. Trefethen authored a paper using a tweaked version of the Gilbert-Shannon-Reeds model showing that the minimum number of riffles for total randomization could also be 5, if the method of defining randomness is changed.[4][5]
nibble  tidbits  trivia  cocktail  wiki  reference  games  howto  random  models  math  applications  probability  math.CO  mixing  markov  sampling  best-practices  acm 
august 2019 by nhaliday
Anti-hash test. - Codeforces
- Thue-Morse sequence
- nice paper: http://www.mii.lt/olympiads_in_informatics/pdf/INFOL119.pdf
In general, polynomial string hashing is a useful technique in construction of efficient string algorithms. One simply needs to remember to carefully select the modulus M and the variable of the polynomial p depending on the application. A good rule of thumb is to pick both values as prime numbers with M as large as possible so that no integer overflow occurs and p being at least the size of the alphabet.
2.2. Upper Bound on M
[stuff about 32- and 64-bit integers]
2.3. Lower Bound on M
On the other side Mis bounded due to the well-known birthday paradox: if we consider a collection of m keys with m ≥ 1.2√M then the chance of a collision to occur within this collection is at least 50% (assuming that the distribution of fingerprints is close to uniform on the set of all strings). Thus if the birthday paradox applies then one needs to choose M=ω(m^2)to have a fair chance to avoid a collision. However, one should note that not always the birthday paradox applies. As a benchmark consider the following two problems.

I generally prefer to use Schwartz-Zippel to reason about collision probabilities w/ this kind of thing, eg, https://people.eecs.berkeley.edu/~sinclair/cs271/n3.pdf.

A good way to get more accurate results: just use multiple primes and the Chinese remainder theorem to get as large an M as you need w/o going beyond 64-bit arithmetic.

more on this: https://codeforces.com/blog/entry/60442
oly  oly-programming  gotchas  howto  hashing  algorithms  strings  random  best-practices  counterexample  multi  pdf  papers  nibble  examples  fields  polynomials  lecture-notes  yoga  probability  estimate  magnitude  hacker  adversarial  CAS  lattice  discrete 
august 2019 by nhaliday
Modules Matter Most | Existential Type
note comment from gasche (significant OCaml contributor) critiquing modules vs typeclasses: https://existentialtype.wordpress.com/2011/04/16/modules-matter-most/#comment-735
I also think you’re unfair to type classes. You’re right that they are not completely satisfying as a modularity tool, but your presentation make them sound bad in all aspects, which is certainly not true. The limitation of only having one instance per type may be a strong one, but it allows for a level of impliciteness that is just nice. There is a reason why, for example, monads are relatively nice to use in Haskell, while using monads represented as modules in a SML/OCaml programs is a real pain.

It’s a fact that type-classes are widely adopted and used in the Haskell circles, while modules/functors are only used for relatively coarse-gained modularity in the ML community. It should tell you something useful about those two features: they’re something that current modules miss (or maybe a trade-off between flexibility and implicitness that plays against modules for “modularity in the small”), and it’s dishonest and rude to explain the adoption difference by “people don’t know any better”.
nibble  org:bleg  techtariat  programming  pls  plt  ocaml-sml  functional  haskell  types  composition-decomposition  coupling-cohesion  engineering  structure  intricacy  arrows  matching  network-structure  degrees-of-freedom  linearity  nonlinearity  span-cover  direction  multi  poast  expert-experience  blowhards  static-dynamic  protocol-metadata  cmu 
july 2019 by nhaliday
The Reason Why | West Hunter
There are odd things about the orbits of trans-Neptunian objects that suggest ( to some) that there might be an undiscovered super-Earth-sized planet  a few hundred AU from the Sun..

We haven’t seen it, but then it would be very hard to see. The underlying reason is simple enough, but I have never seen anyone mention it: the signal from such objects drops as the fourth power of distance from the Sun.   Not the second power, as is the case with luminous objects like stars, or faraway objects that are close to a star.  We can image close-in planets of other stars that are light-years distant, but it’s very difficult to see a fair-sized planet a few hundred AU out.
--
interesting little fun fact
west-hunter  scitariat  nibble  tidbits  scale  magnitude  visuo  electromag  spatial  space  measurement  paradox  physics 
july 2019 by nhaliday
Rational Sines of Rational Multiples of p
For which rational multiples of p is the sine rational? We have the three trivial cases
[0, pi/2, pi/6]
and we wish to show that these are essentially the only distinct rational sines of rational multiples of p.

The assertion about rational sines of rational multiples of p follows from two fundamental lemmas. The first is

Lemma 1: For any rational number q the value of sin(qp) is a root of a monic polynomial with integer coefficients.

[Pf uses some ideas unfamiliar to me: similarity parameter of Moebius (linear fraction) transformations, and finding a polynomial for a desired root by constructing a Moebius transformation with a finite period.]

...

Lemma 2: Any root of a monic polynomial f(x) with integer coefficients must either be an integer or irrational.

[Gauss's Lemma, cf Dummit-Foote.]

...
nibble  tidbits  org:junk  analysis  trivia  math  algebra  polynomials  fields  characterization  direction  math.CA  math.CV  ground-up 
july 2019 by nhaliday
The Existential Risk of Math Errors - Gwern.net
How big is this upper bound? Mathematicians have often made errors in proofs. But it’s rarer for ideas to be accepted for a long time and then rejected. But we can divide errors into 2 basic cases corresponding to type I and type II errors:

1. Mistakes where the theorem is still true, but the proof was incorrect (type I)
2. Mistakes where the theorem was false, and the proof was also necessarily incorrect (type II)

Before someone comes up with a final answer, a mathematician may have many levels of intuition in formulating & working on the problem, but we’ll consider the final end-product where the mathematician feels satisfied that he has solved it. Case 1 is perhaps the most common case, with innumerable examples; this is sometimes due to mistakes in the proof that anyone would accept is a mistake, but many of these cases are due to changing standards of proof. For example, when David Hilbert discovered errors in Euclid’s proofs which no one noticed before, the theorems were still true, and the gaps more due to Hilbert being a modern mathematician thinking in terms of formal systems (which of course Euclid did not think in). (David Hilbert himself turns out to be a useful example of the other kind of error: his famous list of 23 problems was accompanied by definite opinions on the outcome of each problem and sometimes timings, several of which were wrong or questionable5.) Similarly, early calculus used ‘infinitesimals’ which were sometimes treated as being 0 and sometimes treated as an indefinitely small non-zero number; this was incoherent and strictly speaking, practically all of the calculus results were wrong because they relied on an incoherent concept - but of course the results were some of the greatest mathematical work ever conducted6 and when later mathematicians put calculus on a more rigorous footing, they immediately re-derived those results (sometimes with important qualifications), and doubtless as modern math evolves other fields have sometimes needed to go back and clean up the foundations and will in the future.7

...

Isaac Newton, incidentally, gave two proofs of the same solution to a problem in probability, one via enumeration and the other more abstract; the enumeration was correct, but the other proof totally wrong and this was not noticed for a long time, leading Stigler to remark:

...

TYPE I > TYPE II?
“Lefschetz was a purely intuitive mathematician. It was said of him that he had never given a completely correct proof, but had never made a wrong guess either.”
- Gian-Carlo Rota13

Case 2 is disturbing, since it is a case in which we wind up with false beliefs and also false beliefs about our beliefs (we no longer know that we don’t know). Case 2 could lead to extinction.

...

Except, errors do not seem to be evenly & randomly distributed between case 1 and case 2. There seem to be far more case 1s than case 2s, as already mentioned in the early calculus example: far more than 50% of the early calculus results were correct when checked more rigorously. Richard Hamming attributes to Ralph Boas a comment that while editing Mathematical Reviews that “of the new results in the papers reviewed most are true but the corresponding proofs are perhaps half the time plain wrong”.

...

Gian-Carlo Rota gives us an example with Hilbert:

...

Olga labored for three years; it turned out that all mistakes could be corrected without any major changes in the statement of the theorems. There was one exception, a paper Hilbert wrote in his old age, which could not be fixed; it was a purported proof of the continuum hypothesis, you will find it in a volume of the Mathematische Annalen of the early thirties.

...

Leslie Lamport advocates for machine-checked proofs and a more rigorous style of proofs similar to natural deduction, noting a mathematician acquaintance guesses at a broad error rate of 1/329 and that he routinely found mistakes in his own proofs and, worse, believed false conjectures30.

[more on these "structured proofs":
https://academia.stackexchange.com/questions/52435/does-anyone-actually-publish-structured-proofs
https://mathoverflow.net/questions/35727/community-experiences-writing-lamports-structured-proofs
]

We can probably add software to that list: early software engineering work found that, dismayingly, bug rates seem to be simply a function of lines of code, and one would expect diseconomies of scale. So one would expect that in going from the ~4,000 lines of code of the Microsoft DOS operating system kernel to the ~50,000,000 lines of code in Windows Server 2003 (with full systems of applications and libraries being even larger: the comprehensive Debian repository in 2007 contained ~323,551,126 lines of code) that the number of active bugs at any time would be… fairly large. Mathematical software is hopefully better, but practitioners still run into issues (eg Durán et al 2014, Fonseca et al 2017) and I don’t know of any research pinning down how buggy key mathematical systems like Mathematica are or how much published mathematics may be erroneous due to bugs. This general problem led to predictions of doom and spurred much research into automated proof-checking, static analysis, and functional languages31.

[related:
https://mathoverflow.net/questions/11517/computer-algebra-errors
I don't know any interesting bugs in symbolic algebra packages but I know a true, enlightening and entertaining story about something that looked like a bug but wasn't.

Define sinc𝑥=(sin𝑥)/𝑥.

Someone found the following result in an algebra package: ∫∞0𝑑𝑥sinc𝑥=𝜋/2
They then found the following results:

...

So of course when they got:

∫∞0𝑑𝑥sinc𝑥sinc(𝑥/3)sinc(𝑥/5)⋯sinc(𝑥/15)=(467807924713440738696537864469/935615849440640907310521750000)𝜋

hmm:
Which means that nobody knows Fourier analysis nowdays. Very sad and discouraging story... – fedja Jan 29 '10 at 18:47

--

Because the most popular systems are all commercial, they tend to guard their bug database rather closely -- making them public would seriously cut their sales. For example, for the open source project Sage (which is quite young), you can get a list of all the known bugs from this page. 1582 known issues on Feb.16th 2010 (which includes feature requests, problems with documentation, etc).

That is an order of magnitude less than the commercial systems. And it's not because it is better, it is because it is younger and smaller. It might be better, but until SAGE does a lot of analysis (about 40% of CAS bugs are there) and a fancy user interface (another 40%), it is too hard to compare.

I once ran a graduate course whose core topic was studying the fundamental disconnect between the algebraic nature of CAS and the analytic nature of the what it is mostly used for. There are issues of logic -- CASes work more or less in an intensional logic, while most of analysis is stated in a purely extensional fashion. There is no well-defined 'denotational semantics' for expressions-as-functions, which strongly contributes to the deeper bugs in CASes.]

...

Should such widely-believed conjectures as P≠NP or the Riemann hypothesis turn out be false, then because they are assumed by so many existing proofs, a far larger math holocaust would ensue38 - and our previous estimates of error rates will turn out to have been substantial underestimates. But it may be a cloud with a silver lining, if it doesn’t come at a time of danger.

https://mathoverflow.net/questions/338607/why-doesnt-mathematics-collapse-down-even-though-humans-quite-often-make-mista

more on formal methods in programming:
https://www.quantamagazine.org/formal-verification-creates-hacker-proof-code-20160920/
https://intelligence.org/2014/03/02/bob-constable/

https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/375342/what-are-the-barriers-that-prevent-widespread-adoption-of-formal-methods
Update: measured effort
In the October 2018 issue of Communications of the ACM there is an interesting article about Formally verified software in the real world with some estimates of the effort.

Interestingly (based on OS development for military equipment), it seems that producing formally proved software requires 3.3 times more effort than with traditional engineering techniques. So it's really costly.

On the other hand, it requires 2.3 times less effort to get high security software this way than with traditionally engineered software if you add the effort to make such software certified at a high security level (EAL 7). So if you have high reliability or security requirements there is definitively a business case for going formal.

WHY DON'T PEOPLE USE FORMAL METHODS?: https://www.hillelwayne.com/post/why-dont-people-use-formal-methods/
You can see examples of how all of these look at Let’s Prove Leftpad. HOL4 and Isabelle are good examples of “independent theorem” specs, SPARK and Dafny have “embedded assertion” specs, and Coq and Agda have “dependent type” specs.6

If you squint a bit it looks like these three forms of code spec map to the three main domains of automated correctness checking: tests, contracts, and types. This is not a coincidence. Correctness is a spectrum, and formal verification is one extreme of that spectrum. As we reduce the rigour (and effort) of our verification we get simpler and narrower checks, whether that means limiting the explored state space, using weaker types, or pushing verification to the runtime. Any means of total specification then becomes a means of partial specification, and vice versa: many consider Cleanroom a formal verification technique, which primarily works by pushing code review far beyond what’s humanly possible.

...

The question, then: “is 90/95/99% correct significantly cheaper than 100% correct?” The answer is very yes. We all are comfortable saying that a codebase we’ve well-tested and well-typed is mostly correct modulo a few fixes in prod, and we’re even writing more than four lines of code a day. In fact, the vast… [more]
ratty  gwern  analysis  essay  realness  truth  correctness  reason  philosophy  math  proofs  formal-methods  cs  programming  engineering  worse-is-better/the-right-thing  intuition  giants  old-anglo  error  street-fighting  heuristic  zooming  risk  threat-modeling  software  lens  logic  inference  physics  differential  geometry  estimate  distribution  robust  speculation  nonlinearity  cost-benefit  convexity-curvature  measure  scale  trivia  cocktail  history  early-modern  europe  math.CA  rigor  news  org:mag  org:sci  miri-cfar  pdf  thesis  comparison  examples  org:junk  q-n-a  stackex  pragmatic  tradeoffs  cracker-prog  techtariat  invariance  DSL  chart  ecosystem  grokkability  heavyweights  CAS  static-dynamic  lower-bounds  complexity  tcs  open-problems  big-surf  ideas  certificates-recognition  proof-systems  PCP  mediterranean  SDP  meta:prediction  epistemic  questions  guessing  distributed  overflow  nibble  soft-question  track-record  big-list  hmm  frontier  state-of-art  move-fast-(and-break-things)  grokkability-clarity  technical-writing  trust 
july 2019 by nhaliday
Factorization of polynomials over finite fields - Wikipedia
In mathematics and computer algebra the factorization of a polynomial consists of decomposing it into a product of irreducible factors. This decomposition is theoretically possible and is unique for polynomials with coefficients in any field, but rather strong restrictions on the field of the coefficients are needed to allow the computation of the factorization by means of an algorithm. In practice, algorithms have been designed only for polynomials with coefficients in a finite field, in the field of rationals or in a finitely generated field extension of one of them.

All factorization algorithms, including the case of multivariate polynomials over the rational numbers, reduce the problem to this case; see polynomial factorization. It is also used for various applications of finite fields, such as coding theory (cyclic redundancy codes and BCH codes), cryptography (public key cryptography by the means of elliptic curves), and computational number theory.

As the reduction of the factorization of multivariate polynomials to that of univariate polynomials does not have any specificity in the case of coefficients in a finite field, only polynomials with one variable are considered in this article.

...

In the algorithms that follow, the complexities are expressed in terms of number of arithmetic operations in Fq, using classical algorithms for the arithmetic of polynomials.

[ed.: Interesting choice...]

...

Factoring algorithms
Many algorithms for factoring polynomials over finite fields include the following three stages:

Square-free factorization
Distinct-degree factorization
Equal-degree factorization
An important exception is Berlekamp's algorithm, which combines stages 2 and 3.

Berlekamp's algorithm
Main article: Berlekamp's algorithm
The Berlekamp's algorithm is historically important as being the first factorization algorithm, which works well in practice. However, it contains a loop on the elements of the ground field, which implies that it is practicable only over small finite fields. For a fixed ground field, its time complexity is polynomial, but, for general ground fields, the complexity is exponential in the size of the ground field.

[ed.: This actually looks fairly implementable.]
wiki  reference  concept  algorithms  calculation  nibble  numerics  math  algebra  math.CA  fields  polynomials  levers  multiplicative  math.NT 
july 2019 by nhaliday
c++ - Which is faster: Stack allocation or Heap allocation - Stack Overflow
On my machine, using g++ 3.4.4 on Windows, I get "0 clock ticks" for both stack and heap allocation for anything less than 100000 allocations, and even then I get "0 clock ticks" for stack allocation and "15 clock ticks" for heap allocation. When I measure 10,000,000 allocations, stack allocation takes 31 clock ticks and heap allocation takes 1562 clock ticks.

so maybe around 100x difference? what does that work out to in terms of total workload?

hmm:
http://vlsiarch.eecs.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/asplos17mallacc.pdf
Recent work shows that dynamic memory allocation consumes nearly 7% of all cycles in Google datacenters.

That's not too bad actually. Seems like I shouldn't worry about shifting from heap to stack/globals unless profiling says it's important, particularly for non-oly stuff.

edit: Actually, factor x100 for 7% is pretty high, could be increase constant factor by almost an order of magnitude.

edit: Well actually that's not the right math. 93% + 7%*.01 is not much smaller than 100%
q-n-a  stackex  programming  c(pp)  systems  memory-management  performance  intricacy  comparison  benchmarks  data  objektbuch  empirical  google  papers  nibble  time  measure  pro-rata  distribution  multi  pdf  oly-programming  computer-memory 
june 2019 by nhaliday
data structures - Why are Red-Black trees so popular? - Computer Science Stack Exchange
- AVL trees have smaller average depth than red-black trees, and thus searching for a value in AVL tree is consistently faster.
- Red-black trees make less structural changes to balance themselves than AVL trees, which could make them potentially faster for insert/delete. I'm saying potentially, because this would depend on the cost of the structural change to the tree, as this will depend a lot on the runtime and implemntation (might also be completely different in a functional language when the tree is immutable?)

There are many benchmarks online that compare AVL and Red-black trees, but what struck me is that my professor basically said, that usually you'd do one of two things:
- Either you don't really care that much about performance, in which case the 10-20% difference of AVL vs Red-black in most cases won't matter at all.
- Or you really care about performance, in which you case you'd ditch both AVL and Red-black trees, and go with B-trees, which can be tweaked to work much better (or (a,b)-trees, I'm gonna put all of those in one basket.)

--

> For some kinds of binary search trees, including red-black trees but not AVL trees, the "fixes" to the tree can fairly easily be predicted on the way down and performed during a single top-down pass, making the second pass unnecessary. Such insertion algorithms are typically implemented with a loop rather than recursion, and often run slightly faster in practice than their two-pass counterparts.

So a RedBlack tree insert can be implemented without recursion, on some CPUs recursion is very expensive if you overrun the function call cache (e.g SPARC due to is use of Register window)

--

There are some cases where you can't use B-trees at all.

One prominent case is std::map from C++ STL. The standard requires that insert does not invalidate existing iterators

...

I also believe that "single pass tail recursive" implementation is not the reason for red black tree popularity as a mutable data structure.

First of all, stack depth is irrelevant here, because (given log𝑛 height) you would run out of the main memory before you run out of stack space. Jemalloc is happy with preallocating worst case depth on the stack.
nibble  q-n-a  overflow  cs  algorithms  tcs  data-structures  functional  orders  trees  cost-benefit  tradeoffs  roots  explanans  impetus  performance  applicability-prereqs  programming  pls  c(pp)  ubiquity 
june 2019 by nhaliday
Interview with Donald Knuth | Interview with Donald Knuth | InformIT
Andrew Binstock and Donald Knuth converse on the success of open source, the problem with multicore architecture, the disappointing lack of interest in literate programming, the menace of reusable code, and that urban legend about winning a programming contest with a single compilation.

Reusable vs. re-editable code: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01966146/document
- Konrad Hinsen

https://www.johndcook.com/blog/2008/05/03/reusable-code-vs-re-editable-code/
I think whether code should be editable or in “an untouchable black box” depends on the number of developers involved, as well as their talent and motivation. Knuth is a highly motivated genius working in isolation. Most software is developed by large teams of programmers with varying degrees of motivation and talent. I think the further you move away from Knuth along these three axes the more important black boxes become.
nibble  interview  giants  expert-experience  programming  cs  software  contrarianism  carmack  oss  prediction  trends  linux  concurrency  desktop  comparison  checking  debugging  stories  engineering  hmm  idk  algorithms  books  debate  flux-stasis  duplication  parsimony  best-practices  writing  documentation  latex  intricacy  structure  hardware  caching  workflow  editors  composition-decomposition  coupling-cohesion  exposition  technical-writing  thinking  cracker-prog  code-organizing  grokkability  multi  techtariat  commentary  pdf  reflection  essay  examples  python  data-science  libraries  grokkability-clarity  project-management 
june 2019 by nhaliday
Bareiss algorithm - Wikipedia
During the execution of Bareiss algorithm, every integer that is computed is the determinant of a submatrix of the input matrix. This allows, using the Hadamard inequality, to bound the size of these integers. Otherwise, the Bareiss algorithm may be viewed as a variant of Gaussian elimination and needs roughly the same number of arithmetic operations.
nibble  ground-up  cs  tcs  algorithms  complexity  linear-algebra  numerics  sci-comp  fields  calculation  nitty-gritty 
june 2019 by nhaliday
What's the expected level of paper for top conferences in Computer Science - Academia Stack Exchange
Top. The top level.

My experience on program committees for STOC, FOCS, ITCS, SODA, SOCG, etc., is that there are FAR more submissions of publishable quality than can be accepted into the conference. By "publishable quality" I mean a well-written presentation of a novel, interesting, and non-trivial result within the scope of the conference.

...

There are several questions that come up over and over in the FOCS/STOC review cycle:

- How surprising / novel / elegant / interesting is the result?
- How surprising / novel / elegant / interesting / general are the techniques?
- How technically difficult is the result? Ironically, FOCS and STOC committees have a reputation for ignoring the distinction between trivial (easy to derive from scratch) and nondeterministically trivial (easy to understand after the fact).
- What is the expected impact of this result? Is this paper going to change the way people do theoretical computer science over the next five years?
- Is the result of general interest to the theoretical computer science community? Or is it only of interest to a narrow subcommunity? In particular, if the topic is outside the STOC/FOCS mainstream—say, for example, computational topology—does the paper do a good job of explaining and motivating the results to a typical STOC/FOCS audience?
nibble  q-n-a  overflow  academia  tcs  cs  meta:research  publishing  scholar  lens  properties  cost-benefit  analysis  impetus  increase-decrease  soft-question  motivation  proofs  search  complexity  analogy  problem-solving  elegance  synthesis  hi-order-bits  novelty  discovery 
june 2019 by nhaliday
classification - ImageNet: what is top-1 and top-5 error rate? - Cross Validated
Now, in the case of top-1 score, you check if the top class (the one having the highest probability) is the same as the target label.

In the case of top-5 score, you check if the target label is one of your top 5 predictions (the 5 ones with the highest probabilities).
nibble  q-n-a  overflow  machine-learning  deep-learning  metrics  comparison  ranking  top-n  classification  computer-vision  benchmarks  dataset  accuracy  error  jargon 
june 2019 by nhaliday
What every computer scientist should know about floating-point arithmetic
Floating-point arithmetic is considered as esoteric subject by many people. This is rather surprising, because floating-point is ubiquitous in computer systems: Almost every language has a floating-point datatype; computers from PCs to supercomputers have floating-point accelerators; most compilers will be called upon to compile floating-point algorithms from time to time; and virtually every operating system must respond to floating-point exceptions such as overflow. This paper presents a tutorial on the aspects of floating-point that have a direct impact on designers of computer systems. It begins with background on floating-point representation and rounding error, continues with a discussion of the IEEE floating point standard, and concludes with examples of how computer system builders can better support floating point.

Float Toy: http://evanw.github.io/float-toy/
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=22113485

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/2729637/does-epsilon-really-guarantees-anything-in-floating-point-computations
"you must use an epsilon when dealing with floats" is a knee-jerk reaction of programmers with a superficial understanding of floating-point computations, for comparisons in general (not only to zero).

This is usually unhelpful because it doesn't tell you how to minimize the propagation of rounding errors, it doesn't tell you how to avoid cancellation or absorption problems, and even when your problem is indeed related to the comparison of two floats, it doesn't tell you what value of epsilon is right for what you are doing.

...

Regarding the propagation of rounding errors, there exists specialized analyzers that can help you estimate it, because it is a tedious thing to do by hand.

https://www.di.ens.fr/~cousot/projects/DAEDALUS/synthetic_summary/CEA/Fluctuat/index.html

This was part of HW1 of CS24:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kahan_summation_algorithm
In particular, simply summing n numbers in sequence has a worst-case error that grows proportional to n, and a root mean square error that grows as {\displaystyle {\sqrt {n}}} {\sqrt {n}} for random inputs (the roundoff errors form a random walk).[2] With compensated summation, the worst-case error bound is independent of n, so a large number of values can be summed with an error that only depends on the floating-point precision.[2]

cf:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pairwise_summation
In numerical analysis, pairwise summation, also called cascade summation, is a technique to sum a sequence of finite-precision floating-point numbers that substantially reduces the accumulated round-off error compared to naively accumulating the sum in sequence.[1] Although there are other techniques such as Kahan summation that typically have even smaller round-off errors, pairwise summation is nearly as good (differing only by a logarithmic factor) while having much lower computational cost—it can be implemented so as to have nearly the same cost (and exactly the same number of arithmetic operations) as naive summation.

In particular, pairwise summation of a sequence of n numbers xn works by recursively breaking the sequence into two halves, summing each half, and adding the two sums: a divide and conquer algorithm. Its worst-case roundoff errors grow asymptotically as at most O(ε log n), where ε is the machine precision (assuming a fixed condition number, as discussed below).[1] In comparison, the naive technique of accumulating the sum in sequence (adding each xi one at a time for i = 1, ..., n) has roundoff errors that grow at worst as O(εn).[1] Kahan summation has a worst-case error of roughly O(ε), independent of n, but requires several times more arithmetic operations.[1] If the roundoff errors are random, and in particular have random signs, then they form a random walk and the error growth is reduced to an average of {\displaystyle O(\varepsilon {\sqrt {\log n}})} O(\varepsilon {\sqrt {\log n}}) for pairwise summation.[2]

A very similar recursive structure of summation is found in many fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithms, and is responsible for the same slow roundoff accumulation of those FFTs.[2][3]

https://eng.libretexts.org/Bookshelves/Electrical_Engineering/Book%3A_Fast_Fourier_Transforms_(Burrus)/10%3A_Implementing_FFTs_in_Practice/10.8%3A_Numerical_Accuracy_in_FFTs
However, these encouraging error-growth rates only apply if the trigonometric “twiddle” factors in the FFT algorithm are computed very accurately. Many FFT implementations, including FFTW and common manufacturer-optimized libraries, therefore use precomputed tables of twiddle factors calculated by means of standard library functions (which compute trigonometric constants to roughly machine precision). The other common method to compute twiddle factors is to use a trigonometric recurrence formula—this saves memory (and cache), but almost all recurrences have errors that grow as O(n‾√) , O(n) or even O(n2) which lead to corresponding errors in the FFT.

...

There are, in fact, trigonometric recurrences with the same logarithmic error growth as the FFT, but these seem more difficult to implement efficiently; they require that a table of Θ(logn) values be stored and updated as the recurrence progresses. Instead, in order to gain at least some of the benefits of a trigonometric recurrence (reduced memory pressure at the expense of more arithmetic), FFTW includes several ways to compute a much smaller twiddle table, from which the desired entries can be computed accurately on the fly using a bounded number (usually <3) of complex multiplications. For example, instead of a twiddle table with n entries ωkn , FFTW can use two tables with Θ(n‾√) entries each, so that ωkn is computed by multiplying an entry in one table (indexed with the low-order bits of k ) by an entry in the other table (indexed with the high-order bits of k ).

[ed.: Nicholas Higham's "Accuracy and Stability of Numerical Algorithms" seems like a good reference for this kind of analysis.]
nibble  pdf  papers  programming  systems  numerics  nitty-gritty  intricacy  approximation  accuracy  types  sci-comp  multi  q-n-a  stackex  hmm  oly-programming  accretion  formal-methods  yak-shaving  wiki  reference  algorithms  yoga  ground-up  divide-and-conquer  fourier  books  tidbits  chart  caltech  nostalgia  dynamic  calculator  visualization  protocol-metadata  identity 
may 2019 by nhaliday
[1803.00085] Chinese Text in the Wild
We introduce Chinese Text in the Wild, a very large dataset of Chinese text in street view images.

...

We give baseline results using several state-of-the-art networks, including AlexNet, OverFeat, Google Inception and ResNet for character recognition, and YOLOv2 for character detection in images. Overall Google Inception has the best performance on recognition with 80.5% top-1 accuracy, while YOLOv2 achieves an mAP of 71.0% on detection. Dataset, source code and trained models will all be publicly available on the website.
nibble  pdf  papers  preprint  machine-learning  deep-learning  deepgoog  state-of-art  china  asia  writing  language  dataset  error  accuracy  computer-vision  pic  ocr  org:mat  benchmarks  questions 
may 2019 by nhaliday
algorithm - Skip List vs. Binary Search Tree - Stack Overflow
Skip lists are more amenable to concurrent access/modification. Herb Sutter wrote an article about data structure in concurrent environments. It has more indepth information.

The most frequently used implementation of a binary search tree is a red-black tree. The concurrent problems come in when the tree is modified it often needs to rebalance. The rebalance operation can affect large portions of the tree, which would require a mutex lock on many of the tree nodes. Inserting a node into a skip list is far more localized, only nodes directly linked to the affected node need to be locked.
q-n-a  stackex  nibble  programming  tcs  data-structures  performance  concurrency  comparison  cost-benefit  applicability-prereqs  random  trees  tradeoffs 
may 2019 by nhaliday
Burrito: Rethinking the Electronic Lab Notebook
Seems very well-suited for ML experiments (if you can get it to work), also the nilfs aspect is cool and basically implements exactly one of the my project ideas (mini-VCS for competitive programming). Unfortunately gnarly installation instructions specify running it on Linux VM: https://github.com/pgbovine/burrito/blob/master/INSTALL. Linux is hard requirement due to nilfs.
techtariat  project  tools  devtools  linux  programming  yak-shaving  integration-extension  nitty-gritty  workflow  exocortex  scholar  software  python  app  desktop  notetaking  state  machine-learning  data-science  nibble  sci-comp  oly  vcs  multi  repo  paste  homepage  research 
may 2019 by nhaliday
Philip Guo - Research Design Patterns
List of ways to generate research directions. Some are pretty specific to applied CS.
techtariat  nibble  academia  meta:research  scholar  cs  systems  list  top-n  checklists  ideas  creative  frontier  memes(ew)  info-dynamics  innovation  novelty  the-trenches  tactics 
may 2019 by nhaliday
ON THE GEOMETRY OF NASH EQUILIBRIA AND CORRELATED EQUILIBRIA
Abstract: It is well known that the set of correlated equilibrium distributions of an n-player noncooperative game is a convex polytope that includes all the Nash equilibrium distributions. We demonstrate an elementary yet surprising result: the Nash equilibria all lie on the boundary of the polytope.
pdf  nibble  papers  ORFE  game-theory  optimization  geometry  dimensionality  linear-algebra  equilibrium  structure  differential  correlation  iidness  acm  linear-programming  spatial  characterization  levers 
may 2019 by nhaliday
A Recipe for Training Neural Networks
acmtariat  org:bleg  nibble  machine-learning  deep-learning  howto  tutorial  guide  nitty-gritty  gotchas  init  list  checklists  expert-experience  abstraction  composition-decomposition  gradient-descent  data-science  error  debugging  benchmarks  programming  engineering  best-practices  dataviz  checking  plots  generalization  regularization  unsupervised  optimization  ensembles  random  methodology  multi  twitter  social  discussion  techtariat  links  org:med  pdf  visualization  python  recommendations  advice  devtools 
april 2019 by nhaliday
soft question - What are good non-English languages for mathematicians to know? - MathOverflow
I'm with Deane here: I think learning foreign languages is not a very mathematically productive thing to do; of course, there are lots of good reasons to learn foreign languages, but doing mathematics is not one of them. Not only are there few modern mathematics papers written in languages other than English, but the primary other language they are written (French) in is pretty easy to read without actually knowing it.

Even though I've been to France several times, my spoken French mostly consists of "merci," "si vous plait," "d'accord" and some food words; I've still skimmed 100 page long papers in French without a lot of trouble.

If nothing else, think of reading a paper in French as a good opportunity to teach Google Translate some mathematical French.
q-n-a  overflow  math  academia  learning  foreign-lang  publishing  science  french  soft-question  math.AG  nibble  quixotic  comparison  language  china  asia  trends 
february 2019 by nhaliday
[1804.04268] Incomplete Contracting and AI Alignment
We suggest that the analysis of incomplete contracting developed by law and economics researchers can provide a useful framework for understanding the AI alignment problem and help to generate a systematic approach to finding solutions. We first provide an overview of the incomplete contracting literature and explore parallels between this work and the problem of AI alignment. As we emphasize, misalignment between principal and agent is a core focus of economic analysis. We highlight some technical results from the economics literature on incomplete contracts that may provide insights for AI alignment researchers. Our core contribution, however, is to bring to bear an insight that economists have been urged to absorb from legal scholars and other behavioral scientists: the fact that human contracting is supported by substantial amounts of external structure, such as generally available institutions (culture, law) that can supply implied terms to fill the gaps in incomplete contracts. We propose a research agenda for AI alignment work that focuses on the problem of how to build AI that can replicate the human cognitive processes that connect individual incomplete contracts with this supporting external structure.
nibble  preprint  org:mat  papers  ai  ai-control  alignment  coordination  contracts  law  economics  interests  culture  institutions  number  context  behavioral-econ  composition-decomposition  rent-seeking  whole-partial-many 
april 2018 by nhaliday
Theory of Self-Reproducing Automata - John von Neumann
Fourth Lecture: THE ROLE OF HIGH AND OF EXTREMELY HIGH COMPLICATION

Comparisons between computing machines and the nervous systems. Estimates of size for computing machines, present and near future.

Estimates for size for the human central nervous system. Excursus about the “mixed” character of living organisms. Analog and digital elements. Observations about the “mixed” character of all componentry, artificial as well as natural. Interpretation of the position to be taken with respect to these.

Evaluation of the discrepancy in size between artificial and natural automata. Interpretation of this discrepancy in terms of physical factors. Nature of the materials used.

The probability of the presence of other intellectual factors. The role of complication and the theoretical penetration that it requires.

Questions of reliability and errors reconsidered. Probability of individual errors and length of procedure. Typical lengths of procedure for computing machines and for living organisms--that is, for artificial and for natural automata. Upper limits on acceptable probability of error in individual operations. Compensation by checking and self-correcting features.

Differences of principle in the way in which errors are dealt with in artificial and in natural automata. The “single error” principle in artificial automata. Crudeness of our approach in this case, due to the lack of adequate theory. More sophisticated treatment of this problem in natural automata: The role of the autonomy of parts. Connections between this autonomy and evolution.

- 10^10 neurons in brain, 10^4 vacuum tubes in largest computer at time
- machines faster: 5 ms from neuron potential to neuron potential, 10^-3 ms for vacuum tubes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_von_Neumann#Computing
pdf  article  papers  essay  nibble  math  cs  computation  bio  neuro  neuro-nitgrit  scale  magnitude  comparison  acm  von-neumann  giants  thermo  phys-energy  speed  performance  time  density  frequency  hardware  ems  efficiency  dirty-hands  street-fighting  fermi  estimate  retention  physics  interdisciplinary  multi  wiki  links  people  🔬  atoms  duplication  iteration-recursion  turing  complexity  measure  nature  technology  complex-systems  bits  information-theory  circuits  robust  structure  composition-decomposition  evolution  mutation  axioms  analogy  thinking  input-output  hi-order-bits  coding-theory  flexibility  rigidity  automata-languages 
april 2018 by nhaliday
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read