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antivirus - How to scan a PDF for malware? - Information Security Stack Exchange
Didier Stevens is the main focus when looking at PDF based malware.
- linked tools are more generally useful beyond malware (eg, get statistics on internal composition of PDFs)
- pdfid.py at least is kinda slow (6 minutes for a 100MB file)
q-n-a  stackex  security  tools  software  recommendations  terminal  pdf  yak-shaving 
november 2019 by nhaliday
Is the bounty system effective? - Meta Stack Exchange
https://math.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/20155/how-effective-are-bounties
could do some kinda econometric analysis using the data explorer to determine this once and for all: https://pinboard.in/u:nhaliday/b:c0cd449b9e69
maybe some kinda RDD in time, or difference-in-differences?
I don't think answer quality/quantity by time meets the common trend assumption for DD, tho... Questions that eventually receive bounty are prob higher quality in the first place, and higher quality answers accumulate more and better answers regardless. Hmm.
q-n-a  stackex  forum  community  info-foraging  efficiency  cost-benefit  data  analysis  incentives  attention  quality  ubiquity  supply-demand  multi  math  causation  endogenous-exogenous  intervention  branches  control  tactics  sleuthin  hmm  idk  todo  data-science  overflow  dbs  regression  shift  methodology  econometrics 
november 2019 by nhaliday
Ask HN: Getting into NLP in 2018? | Hacker News
syllogism (spaCy author):
I think it's probably a bad strategy to try to be the "NLP guy" to potential employers. You'd do much better off being a software engineer on a project with people with ML or NLP expertise.

NLP projects fail a lot. If you line up a job as a company's first NLP person, you'll probably be setting yourself up for failure. You'll get handed an idea that can't work, you won't know enough about how to push back to change it into something that might, etc. After the project fails, you might get a chance to fail at a second one, but maybe not a third. This isn't a great way to move into any new field.

I think a cunning plan would be to angle to be the person who "productionises" models.
...
.--
...

Basically, don't just work on having more powerful solutions. Make sure you've tried hard to have easier problems as well --- that part tends to be higher leverage.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14008752
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=12916498
https://algorithmia.com/blog/introduction-natural-language-processing-nlp
hn  q-n-a  discussion  tech  programming  machine-learning  nlp  strategy  career  planning  human-capital  init  advice  books  recommendations  course  unit  links  automation  project  examples  applications  multi  mooc  lectures  video  data-science  org:com  roadmap  summary  error  applicability-prereqs  ends-means  telos-atelos  cost-benefit 
november 2019 by nhaliday
REST is the new SOAP | Hacker News
hn  commentary  techtariat  org:ngo  programming  engineering  web  client-server  networking  rant  rhetoric  contrarianism  idk  org:med  best-practices  working-stiff  api  models  protocol-metadata  internet  state  structure  chart  multi  q-n-a  discussion  expert-experience  track-record  reflection  cost-benefit  design  system-design  comparison  code-organizing  flux-stasis  interface-compatibility  trends  gotchas  stackex  state-of-art  distributed  concurrency  abstraction  concept  conceptual-vocab  python  ubiquity  list  top-n  duplication  synchrony  performance  caching 
november 2019 by nhaliday
Ask HN: What's a promising area to work on? | Hacker News
hn  discussion  q-n-a  ideas  impact  trends  the-bones  speedometer  technology  applications  tech  cs  programming  list  top-n  recommendations  lens  machine-learning  deep-learning  security  privacy  crypto  software  hardware  cloud  biotech  CRISPR  bioinformatics  biohacking  blockchain  cryptocurrency  crypto-anarchy  healthcare  graphics  SIGGRAPH  vr  automation  universalism-particularism  expert-experience  reddit  social  arbitrage  supply-demand  ubiquity  cost-benefit  compensation  chart  career  planning  strategy  long-term  advice  sub-super  commentary  rhetoric  org:com  techtariat  human-capital  prioritizing  tech-infrastructure  working-stiff  data-science 
november 2019 by nhaliday
The Definitive Guide To Website Authentication | Hacker News
hn  commentary  q-n-a  stackex  programming  identification-equivalence  security  web  client-server  crypto  checklists  best-practices  objektbuch  api  multi  cheatsheet  chart  system-design  nitty-gritty  yak-shaving  comparison  explanation  summary  jargon  state  networking  protocol-metadata  time 
november 2019 by nhaliday
javascript - ReactJS - Does render get called any time "setState" is called? - Stack Overflow
By default - yes.

There is a method boolean shouldComponentUpdate(object nextProps, object nextState), each component has this method and it's responsible to determine "should component update (run render function)?" every time you change state or pass new props from parent component.

You can write your own implementation of shouldComponentUpdate method for your component, but default implementation always returns true - meaning always re-run render function.

...

Next part of your question:

If so, why? I thought the idea was that React only rendered as little as needed - when state changed.

There are two steps of what we may call "render":

Virtual DOM render: when render method is called it returns a new virtual dom structure of the component. As I mentioned before, this render method is called always when you call setState(), because shouldComponentUpdate always returns true by default. So, by default, there is no optimization here in React.

Native DOM render: React changes real DOM nodes in your browser only if they were changed in the Virtual DOM and as little as needed - this is that great React's feature which optimizes real DOM mutation and makes React fast.
q-n-a  stackex  programming  intricacy  nitty-gritty  abstraction  state  frontend  web  javascript  libraries  facebook  frameworks  explanation  summary  models 
october 2019 by nhaliday
javascript - What is the purpose of double curly braces in React's JSX syntax? - Stack Overflow
The exterior set of curly braces are letting JSX know you want a JS expression. The interior set of curly braces represent a JavaScript object, meaning you’re passing in an object to the style attribute.
q-n-a  stackex  programming  explanation  trivia  gotchas  syntax  javascript  frontend  DSL  intricacy  facebook  libraries  frameworks 
october 2019 by nhaliday
How is definiteness expressed in languages with no definite article, clitic or affix? - Linguistics Stack Exchange
All languages, as far as we know, do something to mark information status. Basically this means that when you refer to an X, you have to do something to indicate the answer to questions like:
1. Do you have a specific X in mind?
2. If so, you think your hearer is familiar with the X you're talking about?
3. If so, have you already been discussing that X for a while, or is it new to the conversation?
4. If you've been discussing the X for a while, has it been the main topic of conversation?

Question #2 is more or less what we mean by "definiteness."
...

But there are lots of other information-status-marking strategies that don't directly involve definiteness marking. For example:
...
q-n-a  stackex  language  foreign-lang  linguistics  lexical  syntax  concept  conceptual-vocab  thinking  things  span-cover  direction  degrees-of-freedom  communication  anglo  japan  china  asia  russia  mediterranean  grokkability-clarity  intricacy  uniqueness  number  universalism-particularism  whole-partial-many  usa  latin-america  farmers-and-foragers  nordic  novelty  trivia  duplication  dependence-independence  spanish  context  orders  water  comparison 
october 2019 by nhaliday
What does it mean when a CSS rule is grayed out in Chrome's element inspector? - Stack Overflow
It seems that a strike-through indicates that a rule was overridden, but what does it mean when a style is grayed out?

--

Greyed/dimmed out text, can mean either

1. it's a default rule/property the browser applies, which includes defaulted short-hand properties.
2. It involves inheritance which is a bit more complicated.

...

In the case where a rule is applied to the currently selected element due to inheritance (i.e. the rule was applied to an ancestor, and the selected element inherited it), chrome will again display the entire ruleset.

The rules which are applied to the currently selected element appear in normal text.

If a rule exists in that set but is not applied because it's a non-inheritable property (e.g. background color), it will appear as greyed/dimmed text.

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/34712218/what-does-it-mean-when-chrome-dev-tools-shows-a-computed-property-greyed-out
Please note, not the Styles panel (I know what greyed-out means in that context—not applied), but the next panel over, the Computed properties panel.
--
The gray calculated properties are neither default, nor inherited. This only occurs on properties that were not defined for the element, but _calculated_ from either its children or parent _based on runtime layout rendering_.

Take this simple page as an example, display is default and font-size is inherited:
q-n-a  stackex  programming  frontend  web  DSL  form-design  devtools  explanation  trivia  tip-of-tongue  direct-indirect  trees  spreading  multi  nitty-gritty  static-dynamic  constraint-satisfaction  ui  browser  properties 
october 2019 by nhaliday
Advantages and disadvantages of building a single page web application - Software Engineering Stack Exchange
Advantages
- All data has to be available via some sort of API - this is a big advantage for my use case as I want to have an API to my application anyway. Right now about 60-70% of my calls to get/update data are done through a REST API. Doing a single page application will allow me to better test my REST API since the application itself will use it. It also means that as the application grows, the API itself will grow since that is what the application uses; no need to maintain the API as an add-on to the application.
- More responsive application - since all data loaded after the initial page is kept to a minimum and transmitted in a compact format (like JSON), data requests should generally be faster, and the server will do slightly less processing.

Disadvantages
- Duplication of code - for example, model code. I am going to have to create models both on the server side (PHP in this case) and the client side in Javascript.
- Business logic in Javascript - I can't give any concrete examples on why this would be bad but it just doesn't feel right to me having business logic in Javascript that anyone can read.
- Javascript memory leaks - since the page never reloads, Javascript memory leaks can happen, and I would not even know where to begin to debug them.

--

Disadvantages I often see with Single Page Web Applications:
- Inability to link to a specific part of the site, there's often only 1 entry point.
- Disfunctional back and forward buttons.
- The use of tabs is limited or non-existant.
(especially mobile:)
- Take very long to load.
- Don't function at all.
- Can't reload a page, a sudden loss of network takes you back to the start of the site.

This answer is outdated, Most single page application frameworks have a way to deal with the issues above – Luis May 27 '14 at 1:41
@Luis while the technology is there, too often it isn't used. – Pieter B Jun 12 '14 at 6:53

https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/201838/building-a-web-application-that-is-almost-completely-rendered-by-javascript-whi

https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/143194/what-advantages-are-conferred-by-using-server-side-page-rendering
Server-side HTML rendering:
- Fastest browser rendering
- Page caching is possible as a quick-and-dirty performance boost
- For "standard" apps, many UI features are pre-built
- Sometimes considered more stable because components are usually subject to compile-time validation
- Leans on backend expertise
- Sometimes faster to develop*
*When UI requirements fit the framework well.

Client-side HTML rendering:
- Lower bandwidth usage
- Slower initial page render. May not even be noticeable in modern desktop browsers. If you need to support IE6-7, or many mobile browsers (mobile webkit is not bad) you may encounter bottlenecks.
- Building API-first means the client can just as easily be an proprietary app, thin client, another web service, etc.
- Leans on JS expertise
- Sometimes faster to develop**
**When the UI is largely custom, with more interesting interactions. Also, I find coding in the browser with interpreted code noticeably speedier than waiting for compiles and server restarts.

https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/237537/progressive-enhancement-vs-single-page-apps

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/21862054/single-page-application-advantages-and-disadvantages
=== ADVANTAGES ===
1. SPA is extremely good for very responsive sites:
2. With SPA we don't need to use extra queries to the server to download pages.
3.May be any other advantages? Don't hear about any else..

=== DISADVANTAGES ===
1. Client must enable javascript.
2. Only one entry point to the site.
3. Security.

https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/287819/should-you-write-your-back-end-as-an-api
focused on .NET

https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/337467/is-it-normal-design-to-completely-decouple-backend-and-frontend-web-applications
A SPA comes with a few issues associated with it. Here are just a few that pop in my mind now:
- it's mostly JavaScript. One error in a section of your application might prevent other sections of the application to work because of that Javascript error.
- CORS.
- SEO.
- separate front-end application means separate projects, deployment pipelines, extra tooling, etc;
- security is harder to do when all the code is on the client;

- completely interact in the front-end with the user and only load data as needed from the server. So better responsiveness and user experience;
- depending on the application, some processing done on the client means you spare the server of those computations.
- have a better flexibility in evolving the back-end and front-end (you can do it separately);
- if your back-end is essentially an API, you can have other clients in front of it like native Android/iPhone applications;
- the separation might make is easier for front-end developers to do CSS/HTML without needing to have a server application running on their machine.

Create your own dysfunctional single-page app: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18341993
I think are three broadly assumed user benefits of single-page apps:
1. Improved user experience.
2. Improved perceived performance.
3. It’s still the web.

5 mistakes to create a dysfunctional single-page app
Mistake 1: Under-estimate long-term development and maintenance costs
Mistake 2: Use the single-page app approach unilaterally
Mistake 3: Under-invest in front end capability
Mistake 4: Use naïve dev practices
Mistake 5: Surf the waves of framework hype

The disadvantages of single page applications: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9879685
You probably don't need a single-page app: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19184496
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=20384738
MPA advantages:
- Stateless requests
- The browser knows how to deal with a traditional architecture
- Fewer, more mature tools
- SEO for free

When to go for the single page app:
- Core functionality is real-time (e.g Slack)
- Rich UI interactions are core to the product (e.g Trello)
- Lots of state shared between screens (e.g. Spotify)

Hybrid solutions
...
Github uses this hybrid approach.
...

Ask HN: Is it ok to use traditional server-side rendering these days?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13212465

https://www.reddit.com/r/webdev/comments/cp9vb8/are_people_still_doing_ssr/
https://www.reddit.com/r/webdev/comments/93n60h/best_javascript_modern_approach_to_multi_page/
https://www.reddit.com/r/webdev/comments/aax4k5/do_you_develop_solely_using_spa_these_days/
The SEO issues with SPAs is a persistent concern you hear about a lot, yet nobody ever quantifies the issues. That is because search engines keep the operation of their crawler bots and indexing secret. I have read into it some, and it seems that problem used to exist, somewhat, but is more or less gone now. Bots can deal with SPAs fine.
--
I try to avoid building a SPA nowadays if possible. Not because of SEO (there are now server-side solutions to help with that), but because a SPA increases the complexity of the code base by a magnitude. State management with Redux... Async this and that... URL routing... And don't forget to manage page history.

How about just render pages with templates and be done?

If I need a highly dynamic UI for a particular feature, then I'd probably build an embeddable JS widget for it.
q-n-a  stackex  programming  engineering  tradeoffs  system-design  design  web  frontend  javascript  cost-benefit  analysis  security  state  performance  traces  measurement  intricacy  code-organizing  applicability-prereqs  multi  comparison  smoothness  shift  critique  techtariat  chart  ui  coupling-cohesion  interface-compatibility  hn  commentary  best-practices  discussion  trends  client-server  api  composition-decomposition  cycles  frameworks  ecosystem  degrees-of-freedom  dotnet  working-stiff  reddit  social  project-management 
october 2019 by nhaliday
exponential function - Feynman's Trick for Approximating $e^x$ - Mathematics Stack Exchange
1. e^2.3 ~ 10
2. e^.7 ~ 2
3. e^x ~ 1+x
e = 2.71828...

errors (absolute, relative):
1. +0.0258, 0.26%
2. -0.0138, -0.68%
3. 1 + x approximates e^x on [-.3, .3] with absolute error < .05, and relative error < 5.6% (3.7% for [0, .3]).
nibble  q-n-a  overflow  math  feynman  giants  mental-math  calculation  multiplicative  AMT  identity  objektbuch  explanation  howto  estimate  street-fighting  stories  approximation  data  trivia  nitty-gritty 
october 2019 by nhaliday
Ask HN: How do you manage your one-man project? | Hacker News
The main thing is to not fall into the "productivity porn" trap of trying to find the best tool instead of actually getting stuff done - when something simple is more than enough.
hn  discussion  productivity  workflow  exocortex  management  prioritizing  parsimony  recommendations  software  desktop  app  webapp  notetaking  discipline  q-n-a  stay-organized  project-management 
october 2019 by nhaliday
When to use margin vs padding in CSS - Stack Overflow
TL;DR: By default I use margin everywhere, except when I have a border or background and want to increase the space inside that visible box.

To me, the biggest difference between padding and margin is that vertical margins auto-collapse, and padding doesn't.

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/5958699/difference-between-margin-and-padding
One key thing that is missing in the answers here:

Top/Bottom margins are collapsible.

So if you have a 20px margin at the bottom of an element and a 30px margin at the top of the next element, the margin between the two elements will be 30px rather than 50px. This does not apply to left/right margin or padding.
--
Note that there are very specific circumstances in which vertical margins collapse - not just any two vertical margins will do so. Which just makes it all the more confusing (unless you're very familiar with the box model).

[ed.: roughly, separation = padding(A) + padding(B) + max{margin(A), margin(B)}, border in between padding and margin]
q-n-a  stackex  comparison  explanation  summary  best-practices  form-design  DSL  web  frontend  stylized-facts  methodology  programming  multi 
october 2019 by nhaliday
Ask HN: Learning modern web design and CSS | Hacker News
Ask HN: Best way to learn HTML and CSS for web design?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=11048409
Ask HN: How to learn design as a hacker?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8182084

Ask HN: How to learn front-end beyond the basics?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19468043
Ask HN: What is the best JavaScript stack for a beginner to learn?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8780385
Free resources for learning full-stack web development: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13890114

Ask HN: What is essential reading for learning modern web development?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14888251
Ask HN: A Syllabus for Modern Web Development?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=2184645

Ask HN: Modern day web development for someone who last did it 15 years ago: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=20656411
hn  discussion  design  form-design  frontend  web  tutorial  links  recommendations  init  pareto  efficiency  minimum-viable  move-fast-(and-break-things)  advice  roadmap  multi  hacker  games  puzzles  learning  guide  dynamic  retention  DSL  working-stiff  q-n-a  javascript  frameworks  ecosystem  libraries  client-server  hci  ux  books  chart 
october 2019 by nhaliday
Ask HN: Favorite note-taking software? | Hacker News
Ask HN: What is your ideal note-taking software and/or hardware?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13221158

my wishlist as of 2019:
- web + desktop macOS + mobile iOS (at least viewing on the last but ideally also editing)
- sync across all those
- open-source data format that's easy to manipulate for scripting purposes
- flexible organization: mostly tree hierarchical (subsuming linear/unorganized) but with the option for directed (acyclic) graph (possibly a second layer of structure/linking)
- can store plain text, LaTeX, diagrams, sketches, and raster/vector images (video prob not necessary except as links to elsewhere)
- full-text search
- somehow digest/import data from Pinboard, Workflowy, Papers 3/Bookends, Skim, and iBooks/e-readers (esp. Kobo), ideally absorbing most of their functionality
- so, eg, track notes/annotations side-by-side w/ original PDF/DjVu/ePub documents (to replace Papers3/Bookends/Skim), and maybe web pages too (to replace Pinboard)
- OCR of handwritten notes (how to handle equations/diagrams?)
- various forms of NLP analysis of everything (topic models, clustering, etc)
- maybe version control (less important than export)

candidates?:
- Evernote prob ruled out do to heavy use of proprietary data formats (unless I can find some way to export with tolerably clean output)
- Workflowy/Dynalist are good but only cover a subset of functionality I want
- org-mode doesn't interact w/ mobile well (and I haven't evaluated it in detail otherwise)
- TiddlyWiki/Zim are in the running, but not sure about mobile
- idk about vimwiki but I'm not that wedded to vim and it seems less widely used than org-mode/TiddlyWiki/Zim so prob pass on that
- Quiver/Joplin/Inkdrop look similar and cover a lot of bases, TODO: evaluate more
- Trilium looks especially promising, tho read-only mobile and for macOS desktop look at this: https://github.com/zadam/trilium/issues/511
- RocketBook is interesting scanning/OCR solution but prob not sufficient due to proprietary data format
- TODO: many more candidates, eg, TreeSheets, Gingko, OneNote (macOS?...), Notion (proprietary data format...), Zotero, Nodebook (https://nodebook.io/landing), Polar (https://getpolarized.io), Roam (looks very promising)

Ask HN: What do you use for you personal note taking activity?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15736102

Ask HN: What are your note-taking techniques?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9976751

Ask HN: How do you take notes (useful note-taking strategies)?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13064215

Ask HN: How to get better at taking notes?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21419478

Ask HN: How do you keep your notes organized?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21810400

Ask HN: How did you build up your personal knowledge base?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21332957
nice comment from math guy on structure and difference between math and CS: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21338628
useful comment collating related discussions: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21333383
highlights:
Designing a Personal Knowledge base: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8270759
Ask HN: How to organize personal knowledge?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17892731
Do you use a personal 'knowledge base'?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21108527
Ask HN: How do you share/organize knowledge at work and life?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21310030
Managing my personal knowledge base: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=22000791
The sad state of personal data and infrastructure: https://beepb00p.xyz/sad-infra.html
Building personal search infrastructure for your knowledge and code: https://beepb00p.xyz/pkm-search.html

How to annotate literally everything: https://beepb00p.xyz/annotating.html
Ask HN: How do you organize document digests / personal knowledge?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21642289
Ask HN: Good solution for storing notes/excerpts from books?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21920143
Ask HN: What's your cross-platform pdf / ePub reading workflow?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=22170395
some related stuff in the reddit links at the bottom of this pin

https://beepb00p.xyz/grasp.html
How to capture information from your browser and stay sane

Ask HN: Best solutions for keeping a personal log?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21906650

other stuff:
plain text: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21685660

https://www.getdnote.com/blog/how-i-built-personal-knowledge-base-for-myself/
Tiago Forte: https://www.buildingasecondbrain.com

hn search: https://hn.algolia.com/?query=notetaking&type=story

Slant comparison commentary: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=7011281

good comparison of options here in comments here (and Trilium itself looks good): https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18840990

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_note-taking_software

stuff from Andy Matuschak and Michael Nielsen on general note-taking:
https://twitter.com/andy_matuschak/status/1202663202997170176
https://archive.is/1i9ep
Software interfaces undervalue peripheral vision! (a thread)
https://twitter.com/andy_matuschak/status/1199378287555829760
https://archive.is/J06UB
This morning I implemented PageRank to sort backlinks in my prototype note system. Mixed results!
https://twitter.com/andy_matuschak/status/1211487900505792512
https://archive.is/BOiCG
https://archive.is/4zB37
One way to dream up post-book media to make reading more effective and meaningful is to systematize "expert" practices (e.g. How to Read a Book), so more people can do them, more reliably and more cheaply. But… the most erudite people I know don't actually do those things!

the memex essay and comments from various people including Andy on it: https://pinboard.in/u:nhaliday/b:1cddf69c0b31

some more stuff specific to Roam below, and cf "Why books don't work": https://pinboard.in/u:nhaliday/b:b4d4461f6378

wikis:
https://www.slant.co/versus/5116/8768/~tiddlywiki_vs_zim
https://www.wikimatrix.org/compare/tiddlywiki+zim
http://tiddlymap.org/
https://www.zim-wiki.org/manual/Plugins/BackLinks_Pane.html
https://zim-wiki.org/manual/Plugins/Link_Map.html

apps:
Roam: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21440289
https://www.reddit.com/r/RoamResearch/
https://twitter.com/hashtag/roamcult
https://twitter.com/search?q=RoamResearch%20fortelabs
https://twitter.com/search?q=from%3AQiaochuYuan%20RoamResearch&src=typd
https://twitter.com/vgr/status/1199391391803043840
https://archive.is/TJPQN
https://archive.is/CrNwZ
https://www.nateliason.com/blog/roam
https://twitter.com/andy_matuschak/status/1190102757430063106
https://archive.is/To30Q
https://archive.is/UrI1x
https://archive.is/Ww22V
Knowledge systems which display contextual backlinks to a node open up an interesting new behavior. You can bootstrap a new node extensionally (rather than intensionally) by simply linking to it from many other nodes—even before it has any content.
https://twitter.com/michael_nielsen/status/1220197017340612608
Curious: what are the most striking public @RoamResearch pages that you know? I'd like to see examples of people using it for interesting purposes, or in interesting ways.
https://acesounderglass.com/2019/10/24/epistemic-spot-check-the-fate-of-rome-round-2/
https://twitter.com/andy_matuschak/status/1206011493495513089
https://archive.is/xvaMh
If I weren't doing my own research on questions in knowledge systems (which necessitates tinkering with my own), and if I weren't allergic to doing serious work in webapps, I'd likely use Roam instead!
https://talk.dynalist.io/t/roam-research-new-web-based-outliner-that-supports-transclusion-wiki-features-thoughts/5911/16
http://forum.eastgate.com/t/roam-research-interesting-approach-to-note-taking/2713/10
interesting app: http://www.eastgate.com/Tinderbox/
https://www.theatlantic.com/notes/2016/09/labor-day-software-update-tinderbox-scrivener/498443/

intriguing but probably not appropriate for my needs: https://www.sophya.ai/

Inkdrop: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=20103589

Joplin: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15815040
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21555238

MindForgr: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=22088175
one comment links to this, mostly on Notion: https://tkainrad.dev/posts/managing-my-personal-knowledge-base/

https://wreeto.com/

Leo Editor (combines tree outlining w/ literate programming/scripting, I think?): https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17769892

Frame: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18760079

https://www.reddit.com/r/TheMotte/comments/cb18sy/anyone_use_a_personal_wiki_software_to_catalog/
https://archive.is/xViTY
Notion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18904648
https://coda.io/welcome
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15543181

accounting: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19833881
Coda mentioned

https://www.reddit.com/r/slatestarcodex/comments/ap437v/modified_cornell_method_the_optimal_notetaking/
https://archive.is/e9oHu
https://www.reddit.com/r/slatestarcodex/comments/bt8a1r/im_about_to_start_a_one_month_journaling_test/
https://www.reddit.com/r/slatestarcodex/comments/9cot3m/question_how_do_you_guys_learn_things/
https://archive.is/HUH8V
https://www.reddit.com/r/slatestarcodex/comments/d7bvcp/how_to_read_a_book_for_understanding/
https://archive.is/VL2mi

Anki:
https://www.reddit.com/r/Anki/comments/as8i4t/use_anki_for_technical_books/
https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/how-anki-saved-my-engineering-career-293a90f70a73/
https://www.reddit.com/r/slatestarcodex/comments/ch24q9/anki_is_it_inferior_to_the_3x5_index_card_an/
https://archive.is/OaGc5
maybe not the best source for a review/advice

interesting comment(s) about tree outliners and spreadsheets: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21170434
https://lightsheets.app/

tablet:
https://www.inkandswitch.com/muse-studio-for-ideas.html
https://www.inkandswitch.com/capstone-manuscript.html
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=20255457
hn  discussion  recommendations  software  tools  desktop  app  notetaking  exocortex  wkfly  wiki  productivity  multi  comparison  crosstab  properties  applicability-prereqs  nlp  info-foraging  chart  webapp  reference  q-n-a  retention  workflow  reddit  social  ratty  ssc  learning  studying  commentary  structure  thinking  network-structure  things  collaboration  ocr  trees  graphs  LaTeX  search  todo  project  money-for-time  synchrony  pinboard  state  duplication  worrydream  simplification-normalization  links  minimalism  design  neurons  ai-control  openai  miri-cfar  parsimony  intricacy  meta:reading  examples  prepping  new-religion  deep-materialism  techtariat  review  critique  mobile  integration-extension  interface-compatibility  api  twitter  backup  vgr  postrat  personal-finance  pragmatic  stay-organized  project-management  news  org:mag  epistemic  steel-man  explore-exploit  correlation  cost-benefit  convexity-curvature  michael-nielsen  hci  ux  oly  skunkworks  europe  germanic 
october 2019 by nhaliday
Is there a common method for detecting the convergence of the Gibbs sampler and the expectation-maximization algorithm? - Quora
In practice and theory it is much easier to diagnose convergence in EM (vanilla or variational) than in any MCMC algorithm (including Gibbs sampling).

https://www.quora.com/How-can-you-determine-if-your-Gibbs-sampler-has-converged
There is a special case when you can actually obtain the stationary distribution, and be sure that you did! If your markov chain consists of a discrete state space, then take the first time that a state repeats in your chain: if you randomly sample an element between the repeating states (but only including one of the endpoints) you will have a sample from your true distribution.

One can achieve this 'exact MCMC sampling' more generally by using the coupling from the past algorithm (Coupling from the past).

Otherwise, there is no rigorous statistical test for convergence. It may be possible to obtain a theoretical bound for the convergence rates: but these are quite difficult to obtain, and quite often too large to be of practical use. For example, even for the simple case of using the Metropolis algorithm for sampling from a two-dimensional uniform distribution, the best convergence rate upper bound achieved, by Persi Diaconis, was something with an astronomical constant factor like 10^300.

In fact, it is fair to say that for most high dimensional problems, we have really no idea whether Gibbs sampling ever comes close to converging, but the best we can do is use some simple diagnostics to detect the most obvious failures.
nibble  q-n-a  qra  acm  stats  probability  limits  convergence  distribution  sampling  markov  monte-carlo  ML-MAP-E  checking  equilibrium  stylized-facts  gelman  levers  mixing  empirical  plots  manifolds  multi  fixed-point  iteration-recursion  heuristic  expert-experience  theory-practice  project 
october 2019 by nhaliday
online resources - How to write special set notation by hand? - Mathematics Stack Exchange
Your ℕN is “incorrect” in that a capital N in any serif font has the diagonal thickened, not the verticals. In fact, the rule (in Latin alphabet) is that negative slopes are thick, positive ones are thin. Verticals are sometimes thin, sometimes thick. Unique exception: Z. Just look in a newspaper at A, V, X, M, and N.
nibble  q-n-a  overflow  math  writing  notetaking  howto  pic  notation  trivia 
october 2019 by nhaliday
C++ IDE for Linux? - Stack Overflow
A:
- Vim/Emacs + Unix/GNU tools,
- VSCode or Sublime
- CodeLite
- Netbeans
- QT Creator
q-n-a  stackex  programming  c(pp)  devtools  tools  ide  software  recommendations  unix  linux 
september 2019 by nhaliday
python - Why do some languages like C++ and Java have a built-in LinkedList datastructure? - Stack Overflow
I searched through Guido's Python History blog, because I was sure he'd written about this, but apparently that's not where he did so. So, this is based on a combination of reasoning (aka educated guessing) and memory (possibly faulty).

Let's start from the end: Without knowing why Guido didn't add linked lists in Python 0.x, do we at least know why the core devs haven't added them since then, even though they've added a bunch of other types from OrderedDict to set?

Yes, we do. The short version is: Nobody has asked for it, in over two decades. Almost of what's been added to builtins or the standard library over the years has been (a variation on) something that's proven to be useful and popular on PyPI or the ActiveState recipes. That's where OrderedDict and defaultdict came from, for example, and enum and dataclass (based on attrs). There are popular libraries for a few other container types—various permutations of sorted dict/set, OrderedSet, trees and tries, etc., and both SortedContainers and blist have been proposed, but rejected, for inclusion in the stdlib.

But there are no popular linked list libraries, and that's why they're never going to be added.

So, that brings the question back a step: Why are there no popular linked list libraries?
q-n-a  stackex  impetus  roots  programming  pls  python  tradeoffs  cost-benefit  design  data-structures 
august 2019 by nhaliday
selenium - What is the difference between cssSelector & Xpath and which is better with respect to performance for cross browser testing? - Stack Overflow
CSS selectors perform far better than Xpath and it is well documented in Selenium community. Here are some reasons,
- Xpath engines are different in each browser, hence make them inconsistent
- IE does not have a native xpath engine, therefore selenium injects its own xpath engine for compatibility of its API. Hence we lose the advantage of using native browser features that WebDriver inherently promotes.
- Xpath tend to become complex and hence make hard to read in my opinion
However there are some situations where, you need to use xpath, for example, searching for a parent element or searching element by its text (I wouldn't recommend the later).
--
I’m going to hold the unpopular on SO selenium tag opinion that XPath is preferable to CSS in the longer run.

This long post has two sections - first I'll put a back-of-the-napkin proof the performance difference between the two is 0.1-0.3 milliseconds (yes; that's 100 microseconds), and then I'll share my opinion why XPath is more powerful.

...

With the performance out of the picture, why do I think xpath is better? Simple – versatility, and power.

Xpath is a language developed for working with XML documents; as such, it allows for much more powerful constructs than css.
For example, navigation in every direction in the tree – find an element, then go to its grandparent and search for a child of it having certain properties.
It allows embedded boolean conditions – cond1 and not(cond2 or not(cond3 and cond4)); embedded selectors – "find a div having these children with these attributes, and then navigate according to it".
XPath allows searching based on a node's value (its text) – however frowned upon this practice is, it does come in handy especially in badly structured documents (no definite attributes to step on, like dynamic ids and classes - locate the element by its text content).

The stepping in css is definitely easier – one can start writing selectors in a matter of minutes; but after a couple of days of usage, the power and possibilities xpath has quickly overcomes css.
And purely subjective – a complex css is much harder to read than a complex xpath expression.
q-n-a  stackex  comparison  best-practices  programming  yak-shaving  python  javascript  web  frontend  performance  DSL  debate  grokkability  trees  grokkability-clarity 
august 2019 by nhaliday
syntax highlighting - List known filetypes - Vi and Vim Stack Exchange
Type :setfiletype (with a space afterwards), then press Ctrl-d.
q-n-a  stackex  editors  howto  list  pls  config 
august 2019 by nhaliday
How can lazy importing be implemented in Python? - Quora
The Mercurial revision control system has the most solid lazy import implementation I know of. Note well that it's licensed under the GPL, so you can't simply use that code in a project of your own.
- Bryan O'Sullivan
q-n-a  qra  programming  python  howto  examples  performance  tricks  time  latency-throughput  yak-shaving  expert-experience  hg  build-packaging  oss  property-rights  intellectual-property 
august 2019 by nhaliday
multithreading - C++11 introduced a standardized memory model. What does it mean? And how is it going to affect C++ programming? - Stack Overflow
I like the analogy of abandonment of sequential consistency to special relativity tho I think (emphasis on *think*, not know...) GR might be actually be the more appropriate one
q-n-a  stackex  programming  pls  c(pp)  systems  metal-to-virtual  computer-memory  concurrency  intricacy  nitty-gritty  analogy  comparison  physics  relativity  advanced 
august 2019 by nhaliday
Could diving into water save you from a hail of bullets like in movies? - Quora
I believe that while water could help keep you safe in a hail from bullets, there are many flaws, such as being stuck in a low depth pool or running out of oxygen.
q-n-a  qra  embodied  safety  death  fighting  stylized-facts  trivia  fluid  swimming  survival  arms  martial  prepping  short-circuit 
august 2019 by nhaliday
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