recentpopularlog in

nhaliday : trees   55

What does it mean when a CSS rule is grayed out in Chrome's element inspector? - Stack Overflow
It seems that a strike-through indicates that a rule was overridden, but what does it mean when a style is grayed out?

--

Greyed/dimmed out text, can mean either

1. it's a default rule/property the browser applies, which includes defaulted short-hand properties.
2. It involves inheritance which is a bit more complicated.

...

In the case where a rule is applied to the currently selected element due to inheritance (i.e. the rule was applied to an ancestor, and the selected element inherited it), chrome will again display the entire ruleset.

The rules which are applied to the currently selected element appear in normal text.

If a rule exists in that set but is not applied because it's a non-inheritable property (e.g. background color), it will appear as greyed/dimmed text.

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/34712218/what-does-it-mean-when-chrome-dev-tools-shows-a-computed-property-greyed-out
Please note, not the Styles panel (I know what greyed-out means in that context—not applied), but the next panel over, the Computed properties panel.
--
The gray calculated properties are neither default, nor inherited. This only occurs on properties that were not defined for the element, but _calculated_ from either its children or parent _based on runtime layout rendering_.

Take this simple page as an example, display is default and font-size is inherited:
q-n-a  stackex  programming  frontend  web  DSL  form-design  devtools  explanation  trivia  tip-of-tongue  direct-indirect  trees  spreading  multi  nitty-gritty  static-dynamic  constraint-satisfaction  ui  browser  properties 
october 2019 by nhaliday
Ask HN: Favorite note-taking software? | Hacker News
Ask HN: What is your ideal note-taking software and/or hardware?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13221158

my wishlist as of 2019:
- web + desktop macOS + mobile iOS (at least viewing on the last but ideally also editing)
- sync across all those
- open-source data format that's easy to manipulate for scripting purposes
- flexible organization: mostly tree hierarchical (subsuming linear/unorganized) but with the option for directed (acyclic) graph (possibly a second layer of structure/linking)
- can store plain text, LaTeX, diagrams, sketches, and raster/vector images (video prob not necessary except as links to elsewhere)
- full-text search
- somehow digest/import data from Pinboard, Workflowy, Papers 3/Bookends, Skim, and iBooks/e-readers (esp. Kobo), ideally absorbing most of their functionality
- so, eg, track notes/annotations side-by-side w/ original PDF/DjVu/ePub documents (to replace Papers3/Bookends/Skim), and maybe web pages too (to replace Pinboard)
- OCR of handwritten notes (how to handle equations/diagrams?)
- various forms of NLP analysis of everything (topic models, clustering, etc)
- maybe version control (less important than export)

candidates?:
- Evernote prob ruled out do to heavy use of proprietary data formats (unless I can find some way to export with tolerably clean output)
- Workflowy/Dynalist are good but only cover a subset of functionality I want
- org-mode doesn't interact w/ mobile well (and I haven't evaluated it in detail otherwise)
- TiddlyWiki/Zim are in the running, but not sure about mobile
- idk about vimwiki but I'm not that wedded to vim and it seems less widely used than org-mode/TiddlyWiki/Zim so prob pass on that
- Quiver/Joplin/Inkdrop look similar and cover a lot of bases, TODO: evaluate more
- Trilium looks especially promising, tho read-only mobile and for macOS desktop look at this: https://github.com/zadam/trilium/issues/511
- RocketBook is interesting scanning/OCR solution but prob not sufficient due to proprietary data format
- TODO: many more candidates, eg, TreeSheets, Gingko, OneNote (macOS?...), Notion (proprietary data format...), Zotero, Nodebook (https://nodebook.io/landing), Polar (https://getpolarized.io), Roam (looks very promising)

Ask HN: What do you use for you personal note taking activity?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15736102

Ask HN: What are your note-taking techniques?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9976751

Ask HN: How do you take notes (useful note-taking strategies)?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13064215

Ask HN: How to get better at taking notes?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21419478

Ask HN: How do you keep your notes organized?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21810400

Ask HN: How did you build up your personal knowledge base?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21332957
nice comment from math guy on structure and difference between math and CS: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21338628
useful comment collating related discussions: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21333383
highlights:
Designing a Personal Knowledge base: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8270759
Ask HN: How to organize personal knowledge?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17892731
Do you use a personal 'knowledge base'?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21108527
Ask HN: How do you share/organize knowledge at work and life?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21310030
Managing my personal knowledge base: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=22000791
The sad state of personal data and infrastructure: https://beepb00p.xyz/sad-infra.html
Building personal search infrastructure for your knowledge and code: https://beepb00p.xyz/pkm-search.html

How to annotate literally everything: https://beepb00p.xyz/annotating.html
Ask HN: How do you organize document digests / personal knowledge?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21642289
Ask HN: Good solution for storing notes/excerpts from books?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21920143
Ask HN: What's your cross-platform pdf / ePub reading workflow?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=22170395
some related stuff in the reddit links at the bottom of this pin

https://beepb00p.xyz/grasp.html
How to capture information from your browser and stay sane

Ask HN: Best solutions for keeping a personal log?: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21906650

other stuff:
plain text: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21685660

https://www.getdnote.com/blog/how-i-built-personal-knowledge-base-for-myself/
Tiago Forte: https://www.buildingasecondbrain.com

hn search: https://hn.algolia.com/?query=notetaking&type=story

Slant comparison commentary: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=7011281

good comparison of options here in comments here (and Trilium itself looks good): https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18840990

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_note-taking_software

stuff from Andy Matuschak and Michael Nielsen on general note-taking:
https://twitter.com/andy_matuschak/status/1202663202997170176
https://archive.is/1i9ep
Software interfaces undervalue peripheral vision! (a thread)
https://twitter.com/andy_matuschak/status/1199378287555829760
https://archive.is/J06UB
This morning I implemented PageRank to sort backlinks in my prototype note system. Mixed results!
https://twitter.com/andy_matuschak/status/1211487900505792512
https://archive.is/BOiCG
https://archive.is/4zB37
One way to dream up post-book media to make reading more effective and meaningful is to systematize "expert" practices (e.g. How to Read a Book), so more people can do them, more reliably and more cheaply. But… the most erudite people I know don't actually do those things!

the memex essay and comments from various people including Andy on it: https://pinboard.in/u:nhaliday/b:1cddf69c0b31

some more stuff specific to Roam below, and cf "Why books don't work": https://pinboard.in/u:nhaliday/b:b4d4461f6378

wikis:
https://www.slant.co/versus/5116/8768/~tiddlywiki_vs_zim
https://www.wikimatrix.org/compare/tiddlywiki+zim
http://tiddlymap.org/
https://www.zim-wiki.org/manual/Plugins/BackLinks_Pane.html
https://zim-wiki.org/manual/Plugins/Link_Map.html

apps:
Roam: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21440289
https://www.reddit.com/r/RoamResearch/
https://twitter.com/hashtag/roamcult
https://twitter.com/search?q=RoamResearch%20fortelabs
https://twitter.com/search?q=from%3AQiaochuYuan%20RoamResearch&src=typd
https://twitter.com/vgr/status/1199391391803043840
https://archive.is/TJPQN
https://archive.is/CrNwZ
https://www.nateliason.com/blog/roam
https://twitter.com/andy_matuschak/status/1190102757430063106
https://archive.is/To30Q
https://archive.is/UrI1x
https://archive.is/Ww22V
Knowledge systems which display contextual backlinks to a node open up an interesting new behavior. You can bootstrap a new node extensionally (rather than intensionally) by simply linking to it from many other nodes—even before it has any content.
https://twitter.com/michael_nielsen/status/1220197017340612608
Curious: what are the most striking public @RoamResearch pages that you know? I'd like to see examples of people using it for interesting purposes, or in interesting ways.
https://acesounderglass.com/2019/10/24/epistemic-spot-check-the-fate-of-rome-round-2/
https://twitter.com/andy_matuschak/status/1206011493495513089
https://archive.is/xvaMh
If I weren't doing my own research on questions in knowledge systems (which necessitates tinkering with my own), and if I weren't allergic to doing serious work in webapps, I'd likely use Roam instead!
https://talk.dynalist.io/t/roam-research-new-web-based-outliner-that-supports-transclusion-wiki-features-thoughts/5911/16
http://forum.eastgate.com/t/roam-research-interesting-approach-to-note-taking/2713/10
interesting app: http://www.eastgate.com/Tinderbox/
https://www.theatlantic.com/notes/2016/09/labor-day-software-update-tinderbox-scrivener/498443/

intriguing but probably not appropriate for my needs: https://www.sophya.ai/

Inkdrop: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=20103589

Joplin: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15815040
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21555238

MindForgr: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=22088175
one comment links to this, mostly on Notion: https://tkainrad.dev/posts/managing-my-personal-knowledge-base/

https://wreeto.com/

Leo Editor (combines tree outlining w/ literate programming/scripting, I think?): https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17769892

Frame: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18760079

https://www.reddit.com/r/TheMotte/comments/cb18sy/anyone_use_a_personal_wiki_software_to_catalog/
https://archive.is/xViTY
Notion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=18904648
https://coda.io/welcome
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15543181

accounting: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19833881
Coda mentioned

https://www.reddit.com/r/slatestarcodex/comments/ap437v/modified_cornell_method_the_optimal_notetaking/
https://archive.is/e9oHu
https://www.reddit.com/r/slatestarcodex/comments/bt8a1r/im_about_to_start_a_one_month_journaling_test/
https://www.reddit.com/r/slatestarcodex/comments/9cot3m/question_how_do_you_guys_learn_things/
https://archive.is/HUH8V
https://www.reddit.com/r/slatestarcodex/comments/d7bvcp/how_to_read_a_book_for_understanding/
https://archive.is/VL2mi

Anki:
https://www.reddit.com/r/Anki/comments/as8i4t/use_anki_for_technical_books/
https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/how-anki-saved-my-engineering-career-293a90f70a73/
https://www.reddit.com/r/slatestarcodex/comments/ch24q9/anki_is_it_inferior_to_the_3x5_index_card_an/
https://archive.is/OaGc5
maybe not the best source for a review/advice

interesting comment(s) about tree outliners and spreadsheets: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21170434
https://lightsheets.app/

tablet:
https://www.inkandswitch.com/muse-studio-for-ideas.html
https://www.inkandswitch.com/capstone-manuscript.html
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=20255457
hn  discussion  recommendations  software  tools  desktop  app  notetaking  exocortex  wkfly  wiki  productivity  multi  comparison  crosstab  properties  applicability-prereqs  nlp  info-foraging  chart  webapp  reference  q-n-a  retention  workflow  reddit  social  ratty  ssc  learning  studying  commentary  structure  thinking  network-structure  things  collaboration  ocr  trees  graphs  LaTeX  search  todo  project  money-for-time  synchrony  pinboard  state  duplication  worrydream  simplification-normalization  links  minimalism  design  neurons  ai-control  openai  miri-cfar  parsimony  intricacy  meta:reading  examples  prepping  new-religion  deep-materialism  techtariat  review  critique  mobile  integration-extension  interface-compatibility  api  twitter  backup  vgr  postrat  personal-finance  pragmatic  stay-organized  project-management  news  org:mag  epistemic  steel-man  explore-exploit  correlation  cost-benefit  convexity-curvature  michael-nielsen  hci  ux  oly  skunkworks  europe  germanic 
october 2019 by nhaliday
Zettelkästen? | Hacker News
Here’s a LessWrong post that describes it (including the insight “I honestly didn’t think Zettelkasten sounded like a good idea before I tried it” which I also felt).

yeah doesn't sound like a good idea to me either. idk

the linked post: https://pinboard.in/u:nhaliday/b:7a49d1d287f5
hn  commentary  techtariat  germanic  productivity  workflow  notetaking  exocortex  gtd  explore-exploit  business  comparison  academia  tech  ratty  lesswrong  idk  thinking  neurons  network-structure  software  tools  app  metabuch  writing  trees  graphs  skeleton  meta:reading  wkfly  worrydream  stay-organized  structure  multi 
october 2019 by nhaliday
CppCon 2014: Chandler Carruth "Efficiency with Algorithms, Performance with Data Structures" - YouTube
- idk how I feel about this
- makes a distinction between efficiency (basically asymptotic complexity, "doing less work") and performance ("doing that work faster"). idiosyncratic terminology but similar to the "two performance aesthetics" described here: https://pinboard.in/u:nhaliday/b:913a284640c5
- some bikeshedding about vector::reserve and references
- "discontiguous data structures are the root of all evil" (cache-locality, don't use linked lists, etc)
- stacks? queues? just use vector. also suggests circular buffers. says std::deque is really bad
- std::map is bad too (for real SWE, not oly-programming). if you want ordered associative container, just binary search in vector
- std::unordered_map is poorly implemented, unfortunately (due to requirement for buckets in API)
- good implementation of hash table uses open addressing and local (linear?) probing
video  presentation  performance  nitty-gritty  best-practices  working-stiff  programming  c(pp)  systems  data-structures  algorithms  jvm  pls  metal-to-virtual  stylized-facts  rhetoric  expert-experience  google  llvm  efficiency  time-complexity  mobile  computer-memory  caching  oly-programming  common-case  hashing  multi  energy-resources  methodology  trees  techtariat  local-global 
october 2019 by nhaliday
Sci-Hub | The Moral Machine experiment. Nature | 10.1038/s41586-018-0637-6
Preference for inaction
Sparing pedestrians
Sparing the lawful
Sparing females
Sparing the fit
Sparing higher status
Sparing more characters
Sparing the young
Sparing humans

We selected the 130 countries with at least 100 respondents (n range 101–448,125), standardized the nine target AMCEs of each country, and conducted a hierarchical clustering on these nine scores, using Euclidean distance and Ward’s minimum variance method20. This analysis identified three distinct ‘moral clusters’ of countries. These are shown in Fig. 3a, and are broadly consistent with both geographical and cultural proximity according to the Inglehart–Welzel Cultural Map 2010–201421.

The first cluster (which we label the Western cluster) contains North America as well as many European countries of Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox Christian cultural groups. The internal structure within this cluster also exhibits notable face validity, with a sub-cluster containing Scandinavian countries, and a sub-cluster containing Commonwealth countries.

The second cluster (which we call the Eastern cluster) contains many far eastern countries such as Japan and Taiwan that belong to the Confucianist cultural group, and Islamic countries such as Indonesia, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia.

The third cluster (a broadly Southern cluster) consists of the Latin American countries of Central and South America, in addition to some countries that are characterized in part by French influence (for example, metropolitan France, French overseas territories, and territories that were at some point under French leadership). Latin American countries are cleanly separated in their own sub-cluster within the Southern cluster.

...

Fig. 3 | Country-level clusters.

[ed.: I actually rather like how the values the West has compare w/ the global mean according in this plot.]

...
Participants from individualistic cultures, which emphasize the distinctive value of each individual23, show a stronger preference for sparing the greater number of characters (Fig. 4a). Furthermore, participants from collectivistic cultures, which emphasize the respect that is due to older members of the community23, show a weaker preference for sparing younger characters (Fig. 4a, inset).
pdf  study  org:nat  psychology  social-psych  poll  values  data  experiment  empirical  morality  ethics  pop-diff  cultural-dynamics  tradeoffs  death  safety  ai  automation  things  world  gender  biases  status  class  egalitarianism-hierarchy  order-disorder  anarcho-tyranny  crime  age-generation  quantitative-qualitative  number  nature  piracy  exploratory  phalanges  n-factor  europe  the-great-west-whale  nordic  usa  anglo  anglosphere  sinosphere  asia  japan  china  islam  MENA  latin-america  gallic  wonkish  correlation  measure  similarity  dignity  universalism-particularism  law  leviathan  wealth  econ-metrics  institutions  demographics  religion  group-level  within-group  expression-survival  comparison  technocracy  visualization  trees  developing-world  regional-scatter-plots 
october 2019 by nhaliday
Parallel Computing: Theory and Practice
by Umut Acar who also co-authored a different book on parallel algorithms w/ Guy Blelloch from a more high-level and functional perspective
unit  books  cmu  cs  programming  tcs  algorithms  concurrency  c(pp)  divide-and-conquer  libraries  complexity  time-complexity  data-structures  orders  graphs  graph-theory  trees  models  functional  metal-to-virtual  systems 
september 2019 by nhaliday
selenium - What is the difference between cssSelector & Xpath and which is better with respect to performance for cross browser testing? - Stack Overflow
CSS selectors perform far better than Xpath and it is well documented in Selenium community. Here are some reasons,
- Xpath engines are different in each browser, hence make them inconsistent
- IE does not have a native xpath engine, therefore selenium injects its own xpath engine for compatibility of its API. Hence we lose the advantage of using native browser features that WebDriver inherently promotes.
- Xpath tend to become complex and hence make hard to read in my opinion
However there are some situations where, you need to use xpath, for example, searching for a parent element or searching element by its text (I wouldn't recommend the later).
--
I’m going to hold the unpopular on SO selenium tag opinion that XPath is preferable to CSS in the longer run.

This long post has two sections - first I'll put a back-of-the-napkin proof the performance difference between the two is 0.1-0.3 milliseconds (yes; that's 100 microseconds), and then I'll share my opinion why XPath is more powerful.

...

With the performance out of the picture, why do I think xpath is better? Simple – versatility, and power.

Xpath is a language developed for working with XML documents; as such, it allows for much more powerful constructs than css.
For example, navigation in every direction in the tree – find an element, then go to its grandparent and search for a child of it having certain properties.
It allows embedded boolean conditions – cond1 and not(cond2 or not(cond3 and cond4)); embedded selectors – "find a div having these children with these attributes, and then navigate according to it".
XPath allows searching based on a node's value (its text) – however frowned upon this practice is, it does come in handy especially in badly structured documents (no definite attributes to step on, like dynamic ids and classes - locate the element by its text content).

The stepping in css is definitely easier – one can start writing selectors in a matter of minutes; but after a couple of days of usage, the power and possibilities xpath has quickly overcomes css.
And purely subjective – a complex css is much harder to read than a complex xpath expression.
q-n-a  stackex  comparison  best-practices  programming  yak-shaving  python  javascript  web  frontend  performance  DSL  debate  grokkability  trees  grokkability-clarity 
august 2019 by nhaliday
Call graph - Wikipedia
I've found both static and dynamic versions useful (former mostly when I don't want to go thru pain of compiling something)

best options AFAICT:

C/C++ and maybe Go: https://github.com/gperftools/gperftools
https://gperftools.github.io/gperftools/cpuprofile.html

static: https://github.com/Vermeille/clang-callgraph
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/5373714/how-to-generate-a-calling-graph-for-c-code
I had to go through some extra pain to get this to work:
- if you use Homebrew LLVM (that's slightly incompatible w/ macOS c++filt, make sure to pass -n flag)
- similarly macOS sed needs two extra backslashes for each escape of the angle brackets

another option: doxygen

Go: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/31362332/creating-call-graph-in-golang
both static and dynamic in one tool

Java: https://github.com/gousiosg/java-callgraph
both static and dynamic in one tool

Python:
https://github.com/gak/pycallgraph
more up-to-date forks: https://github.com/daneads/pycallgraph2 and https://github.com/YannLuo/pycallgraph
old docs: https://pycallgraph.readthedocs.io/en/master/
I've had some trouble getting nice output from this (even just getting the right set of nodes displayed, not even taking into account layout and formatting).
- Argument parsing syntax is idiosyncratic. Just read `pycallgraph --help`.
- Options -i and -e take glob patterns (see pycallgraph2/{tracer,globbing_filter}.py), which are applied the function names qualified w/ module paths.
- Functions defined in the script you are running receive no module path. There is no easy way to filter for them using the -i and -e options.
- The --debug option gives you the graphviz for your own use instead of just writing the final image produced.

static: https://github.com/davidfraser/pyan
more up-to-date fork: https://github.com/itsayellow/pyan/
one way to good results: `pyan -dea --format yed $MODULE_FILES > output.graphml`, then open up in yEd and use hierarchical layout

various: https://github.com/jrfonseca/gprof2dot

I believe all the dynamic tools listed here support weighting nodes and edges by CPU time/samples (inclusive and exclusive of descendants) and discrete calls. In the case of the gperftools and the Java option you probably have to parse the output to get the latter, tho.

IIRC Dtrace has probes for function entry/exit. So that's an option as well.

old pin: https://github.com/nst/objc_dep
Graph the import dependancies in an Objective-C project
concept  wiki  reference  tools  devtools  graphs  trees  programming  code-dive  let-me-see  big-picture  libraries  software  recommendations  list  top-n  links  c(pp)  golang  python  javascript  jvm  stackex  q-n-a  howto  yak-shaving  visualization  dataviz  performance  structure  oss  osx  unix  linux  static-dynamic  repo  cocoa 
july 2019 by nhaliday
data structures - Why are Red-Black trees so popular? - Computer Science Stack Exchange
- AVL trees have smaller average depth than red-black trees, and thus searching for a value in AVL tree is consistently faster.
- Red-black trees make less structural changes to balance themselves than AVL trees, which could make them potentially faster for insert/delete. I'm saying potentially, because this would depend on the cost of the structural change to the tree, as this will depend a lot on the runtime and implemntation (might also be completely different in a functional language when the tree is immutable?)

There are many benchmarks online that compare AVL and Red-black trees, but what struck me is that my professor basically said, that usually you'd do one of two things:
- Either you don't really care that much about performance, in which case the 10-20% difference of AVL vs Red-black in most cases won't matter at all.
- Or you really care about performance, in which you case you'd ditch both AVL and Red-black trees, and go with B-trees, which can be tweaked to work much better (or (a,b)-trees, I'm gonna put all of those in one basket.)

--

> For some kinds of binary search trees, including red-black trees but not AVL trees, the "fixes" to the tree can fairly easily be predicted on the way down and performed during a single top-down pass, making the second pass unnecessary. Such insertion algorithms are typically implemented with a loop rather than recursion, and often run slightly faster in practice than their two-pass counterparts.

So a RedBlack tree insert can be implemented without recursion, on some CPUs recursion is very expensive if you overrun the function call cache (e.g SPARC due to is use of Register window)

--

There are some cases where you can't use B-trees at all.

One prominent case is std::map from C++ STL. The standard requires that insert does not invalidate existing iterators

...

I also believe that "single pass tail recursive" implementation is not the reason for red black tree popularity as a mutable data structure.

First of all, stack depth is irrelevant here, because (given log𝑛 height) you would run out of the main memory before you run out of stack space. Jemalloc is happy with preallocating worst case depth on the stack.
nibble  q-n-a  overflow  cs  algorithms  tcs  data-structures  functional  orders  trees  cost-benefit  tradeoffs  roots  explanans  impetus  performance  applicability-prereqs  programming  pls  c(pp)  ubiquity 
june 2019 by nhaliday
algorithm - Skip List vs. Binary Search Tree - Stack Overflow
Skip lists are more amenable to concurrent access/modification. Herb Sutter wrote an article about data structure in concurrent environments. It has more indepth information.

The most frequently used implementation of a binary search tree is a red-black tree. The concurrent problems come in when the tree is modified it often needs to rebalance. The rebalance operation can affect large portions of the tree, which would require a mutex lock on many of the tree nodes. Inserting a node into a skip list is far more localized, only nodes directly linked to the affected node need to be locked.
q-n-a  stackex  nibble  programming  tcs  data-structures  performance  concurrency  comparison  cost-benefit  applicability-prereqs  random  trees  tradeoffs 
may 2019 by nhaliday
Sacred text as cultural genome: an inheritance mechanism and method for studying cultural evolution: Religion, Brain & Behavior: Vol 7, No 3
Yasha M. Hartberg & David Sloan Wilson

Any process of evolution requires a mechanism of inheritance for the transmission of information across generations and the expression of phenotypes during each generation. Genetic inheritance mechanisms have been studied for over a century but mechanisms of inheritance for human cultural evolution are far less well understood. Sacred religious texts have the properties required for an inheritance system. They are replicated across generations with high fidelity and are transcribed into action every generation by the invocation and interpretation of selected passages. In this article we borrow concepts and methods from genetics and epigenetics to study the “expressed phenotypes” of six Christian churches that differ along a conservative–progressive axis. Their phenotypic differences, despite drawing upon the same sacred text, can be explained in part by differential expression of the sacred text. Since the invocation and interpretation of sacred texts are often well preserved, our methods allow the expressed phenotypes of religious groups to be studied at any time and place in history.
study  interdisciplinary  bio  sociology  cultural-dynamics  anthropology  religion  christianity  theos  protestant-catholic  politics  ideology  correlation  organizing  institutions  analogy  genetics  genomics  epigenetics  comparison  culture  pdf  piracy  density  flexibility  noble-lie  deep-materialism  new-religion  universalism-particularism  homo-hetero  hypocrisy  group-selection  models  coordination  info-dynamics  evolution  impact  left-wing  right-wing  time  tradition  spreading  sanctity-degradation  coalitions  trees  usa  social-capital  hari-seldon  wisdom  the-basilisk  frequency  sociality  ecology  analytical-holistic  phalanges 
january 2018 by nhaliday
Sequence Modeling with CTC
A visual guide to Connectionist Temporal Classification, an algorithm used to train deep neural networks in speech recognition, handwriting recognition and other sequence problems.
acmtariat  techtariat  org:bleg  nibble  better-explained  machine-learning  deep-learning  visual-understanding  visualization  analysis  let-me-see  research  sequential  audio  classification  model-class  exposition  language  acm  approximation  comparison  markov  iteration-recursion  concept  atoms  distribution  orders  DP  heuristic  optimization  trees  greedy  matching  gradient-descent  org:popup 
december 2017 by nhaliday
Ancient Admixture in Human History
- Patterson, Reich et al., 2012
Population mixture is an important process in biology. We present a suite of methods for learning about population mixtures, implemented in a software package called ADMIXTOOLS, that support formal tests for whether mixture occurred and make it possible to infer proportions and dates of mixture. We also describe the development of a new single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array consisting of 629,433 sites with clearly documented ascertainment that was specifically designed for population genetic analyses and that we genotyped in 934 individuals from 53 diverse populations. To illustrate the methods, we give a number of examples that provide new insights about the history of human admixture. The most striking finding is a clear signal of admixture into northern Europe, with one ancestral population related to present-day Basques and Sardinians and the other related to present-day populations of northeast Asia and the Americas. This likely reflects a history of admixture between Neolithic migrants and the indigenous Mesolithic population of Europe, consistent with recent analyses of ancient bones from Sweden and the sequencing of the genome of the Tyrolean “Iceman.”
nibble  pdf  study  article  methodology  bio  sapiens  genetics  genomics  population-genetics  migration  gene-flow  software  trees  concept  history  antiquity  europe  roots  gavisti  🌞  bioinformatics  metrics  hypothesis-testing  levers  ideas  libraries  tools  pop-structure 
november 2017 by nhaliday
Biopolitics | West Hunter
I have said before that no currently popular ideology acknowledges well-established results of behavioral genetics, quantitative genetics, or psychometrics. Or evolutionary psychology.

What if some ideology or political tradition did? what could they do? What problems could they solve, what capabilities would they have?

Various past societies knew a few things along these lines. They knew that there were significant physical and behavioral differences between the sexes, which is forbidden knowledge in modern academia. Some knew that close inbreeding had negative consequences, which knowledge is on its way to the forbidden zone as I speak. Some cultures with wide enough geographical experience had realistic notions of average cognitive differences between populations. Some people had a rough idea about regression to the mean [ in dynasties], and the Ottomans came up with a highly unpleasant solution – the law of fratricide. The Romans, during the Principate, dealt with the same problem through imperial adoption. The Chinese exam system is in part aimed at the same problem.

...

At least some past societies avoided the social patterns leading to the nasty dysgenic trends we are experiencing today, but for the most part that is due to the anthropic principle: if they’d done something else you wouldn’t be reading this. Also to between-group competition: if you fuck your self up when others don’t, you may be well be replaced. Which is still the case.

If you were designing an ideology from scratch you could make use of all of these facts – not that thinking about genetics and selection hands you the solution to every problem, but you’d have more strings to your bow. And, off the top of your head, you’d understand certain trends that are behind the mountains of Estcarp, for our current ruling classes : invisible and unthinkable, That Which Must Not Be Named. .

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2017/10/08/biopolitics/#comment-96613
“The closest…s the sort of libertarianism promulgated by Charles Murray”
Not very close..
A government that was fully aware of the implications and possibilities of human genetics, one that had the usual kind of state goals [ like persistence and increased power] , would not necessarily be particularly libertarian.

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2017/10/08/biopolitics/#comment-96797
And giving tax breaks to college-educated liberals to have babies wouldn’t appeal much to Trump voters, methinks.

It might be worth making a reasonably comprehensive of the facts and preferences that a good liberal is supposed to embrace and seem to believe. You would have to be fairly quick about it, before it changes. Then you could evaluate about the social impact of having more of them.

Rise and Fall: https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2018/01/18/rise-and-fall/
Every society selects for something: generally it looks as if the direction of selection pressue is more or less an accident. Although nations and empires in the past could have decided to select men for bravery or intelligence, there’s not much sign that anyone actually did this. I mean, they would have known how, if they’d wanted to, just as they knew how to select for destriers, coursers, and palfreys. It was still possible to know such things in the Middle Ages, because Harvard did not yet exist.

A rising empire needs quality human capital, which implies that at minimum that budding imperial society must not have been strongly dysgenic. At least not in the beginning. But winning changes many things, possibly including selective pressures. Imagine an empire with substantial urbanization, one in which talented guys routinely end up living in cities – cities that were demographic sinks. That might change things. Or try to imagine an empire in which survival challenges are greatly reduced, at least for elites, so that people have nothing to keep their minds off their minds and up worshiping Magna Mater. Imagine that an empire that conquers a rival with interesting local pathogens and brings some of them home. Or one that uses up a lot of its manpower conquering less-talented subjects and importing masses of those losers into the imperial heartland.

If any of those scenarios happened valid, they might eventually result in imperial decline – decline due to decreased biological capital.

Right now this is speculation. If we knew enough about the GWAS hits for intelligence, and had enough ancient DNA, we might be able to observe that rise and fall, just as we see dysgenic trends in contemporary populations. But that won’t happen for a long time. Say, a year.

hmm: https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2018/01/18/rise-and-fall/#comment-100350
“Although nations and empires in the past could have decided to select men for bravery or intelligence, there’s not much sign that anyone actually did this.”

Maybe the Chinese imperial examination could effectively have been a selection for intelligence.
--
Nope. I’ve modelled it: the fraction of winners is far too small to have much effect, while there were likely fitness costs from the arduous preparation. Moreover, there’s a recent
paper [Detecting polygenic adaptation in admixture graphs] that looks for indications of when selection for IQ hit northeast Asia: quite a while ago. Obvious though, since Japan has similar scores without ever having had that kind of examination system.

decline of British Empire and utility of different components: https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2018/01/18/rise-and-fall/#comment-100390
Once upon a time, India was a money maker for the British, mainly because they appropriate Bengali tax revenue, rather than trade. The rest of the Empire was not worth much: it didn’t materially boost British per-capita income or military potential. Silesia was worth more to Germany, conferred more war-making power, than Africa was to Britain.
--
If you get even a little local opposition, a colony won’t pay for itself. I seem to remember that there was some, in Palestine.
--
Angels from on high paid for the Boer War.

You know, someone in the 50’s asked for the numbers – how much various colonies cost and how much they paid.

Turned out that no one had ever asked. The Colonial Office had no idea.
west-hunter  scitariat  discussion  ideas  politics  polisci  sociology  anthropology  cultural-dynamics  social-structure  social-science  evopsych  agri-mindset  pop-diff  kinship  regression-to-mean  anthropic  selection  group-selection  impact  gender  gender-diff  conquest-empire  MENA  history  iron-age  mediterranean  the-classics  china  asia  sinosphere  technocracy  scifi-fantasy  aphorism  alt-inst  recruiting  applications  medieval  early-modern  institutions  broad-econ  biodet  behavioral-gen  gnon  civilization  tradition  leviathan  elite  competition  cocktail  🌞  insight  sapiens  arbitrage  paying-rent  realness  kumbaya-kult  war  slippery-slope  unintended-consequences  deep-materialism  inequality  malthus  dysgenics  multi  murray  poast  speculation  randy-ayndy  authoritarianism  time-preference  patience  long-short-run  leadership  coalitions  ideology  rant  westminster  truth  flux-stasis  new-religion  identity-politics  left-wing  counter-revolution  fertility  signaling  status  darwinian  orwellian  ability-competence  organizing 
october 2017 by nhaliday
Recitation 25: Data locality and B-trees
The same idea can be applied to trees. Binary trees are not good for locality because a given node of the binary tree probably occupies only a fraction of a cache line. B-trees are a way to get better locality. As in the hash table trick above, we store several elements in a single node -- as many as will fit in a cache line.

B-trees were originally invented for storing data structures on disk, where locality is even more crucial than with memory. Accessing a disk location takes about 5ms = 5,000,000ns. Therefore if you are storing a tree on disk you want to make sure that a given disk read is as effective as possible. B-trees, with their high branching factor, ensure that few disk reads are needed to navigate to the place where data is stored. B-trees are also useful for in-memory data structures because these days main memory is almost as slow relative to the processor as disk drives were when B-trees were introduced!
nibble  org:junk  org:edu  cornell  lecture-notes  exposition  programming  engineering  systems  dbs  caching  performance  memory-management  os  computer-memory  metal-to-virtual  trees  data-structures  local-global 
september 2017 by nhaliday
Anatomy of an SQL Index: What is an SQL Index
“An index makes the query fast” is the most basic explanation of an index I have ever seen. Although it describes the most important aspect of an index very well, it is—unfortunately—not sufficient for this book. This chapter describes the index structure in a less superficial way but doesn't dive too deeply into details. It provides just enough insight for one to understand the SQL performance aspects discussed throughout the book.

B-trees, etc.
techtariat  tutorial  explanation  performance  programming  engineering  dbs  trees  data-structures  nibble  caching  metal-to-virtual  abstraction  applications  nitty-gritty  ground-up  orders  systems 
september 2017 by nhaliday
Fundamental Theorems of Evolution: The American Naturalist: Vol 0, No 0
I suggest that the most fundamental theorem of evolution is the Price equation, both because of its simplicity and broad scope and because it can be used to derive four other familiar results that are similarly fundamental: Fisher’s average-excess equation, Robertson’s secondary theorem of natural selection, the breeder’s equation, and Fisher’s fundamental theorem. These derivations clarify both the relationships behind these results and their assumptions. Slightly less fundamental results include those for multivariate evolution and social selection. A key feature of fundamental theorems is that they have great simplicity and scope, which are often achieved by sacrificing perfect accuracy. Quantitative genetics has been more productive of fundamental theorems than population genetics, probably because its empirical focus on unknown genotypes freed it from the tyranny of detail and allowed it to focus on general issues.
study  essay  bio  evolution  population-genetics  fisher  selection  EGT  dynamical  exposition  methodology  🌞  big-picture  levers  list  nibble  article  chart  explanation  clarity  trees  ground-up  ideas  grokkability-clarity 
march 2017 by nhaliday
Faster than Fisher | West Hunter
There’s a simple model of the spread of an advantageous allele:  You take σ, the typical  distance people move in one generation, and s,  the selective advantage: the advantageous allele spreads as a nonlinear wave at speed  σ * √(2s).  The problem is, that’s slow.   Suppose that s = 0.10 (a large advantage), σ = 10 kilometers, and a generation time of 30 years: the allele would take almost 7,000 years to expand out 1000 kilometers.

...

This big expansion didn’t just happen from peasants marrying the girl next door: it required migrations and conquests. This one looks as if it rode with the Indo-European expansion: I’ll bet it started out in a group that had domesticated only horses.

The same processes, migration and conquest, must explain the wide distribution of many geographically widespread selective sweeps and partial sweeps. They were adaptive, all right, but expanded much faster than possible from purely local diffusion. We already have reason to think that SLC24A5 was carried to Europe by Middle Eastern farmers; the same is probably true for the haplotype that carries the high-activity ergothioniene transporter and the 35delG connexin-26/GJB2 deafness mutation. The Indo-Europeans probably introduced the T-13910 LCT mutation and the delta-F508 cystic fibrosis mutation, so we should see delta-F508 in northwest India and Pakistan – and we do !

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2014/11/22/faster-than-fisher/#comment-63067
To entertain a (possibly mistaken) physical analogy, it sounds like you’re suggested a sort genetic convection through space, as opposed to conduction. I.e. Entire masses of folks, carrying a new selected variant, are displacing others – as opposed to the slow gene flow process of “girl-next-door.” Is that about right? (Hopefully I haven’t revealed my ignorance of basic thermodynamics here…)

Has there been any attempt to estimate sigma from these time periods?

Genetic Convection: https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2015/02/22/genetic-convection/
People are sometimes interested in estimating the point of origin of a sweeping allele: this is probably effectively impossible even if diffusion were the only spread mechanism, since the selective advantage might well vary in both time and space. But that’s ok, since population movements – genetic convection – are real and very important. This means that the difficulties in estimating the origin of a Fisher wave are totally insignificant, compared to the difficulties of estimating the effects of past colonizations, conquests and Völkerwanderungs. So when Yuval Itan and Mark Thomas estimated that 13,910 T LCT allele originated in central Europe, in the early Neolithic, they didn’t just go wrong because of failing to notice that the same allele is fairly common in northern India: no, their whole notion was unsound in the first place. We’re talking turbulence on steroids. Hari Seldon couldn’t figure this one out from the existing geographic distribution.
west-hunter  genetics  population-genetics  street-fighting  levers  evolution  gavisti  🌞  selection  giants  nibble  fisher  speed  gene-flow  scitariat  stylized-facts  methodology  archaeology  waves  frontier  agri-mindset  analogy  visual-understanding  physics  thermo  interdisciplinary  spreading  spatial  geography  poast  multi  volo-avolo  accuracy  estimate  order-disorder  time  homo-hetero  branches  trees  distribution  data  hari-seldon  aphorism  cliometrics  aDNA  mutation  lexical 
november 2016 by nhaliday
Information Processing: Evidence for (very) recent natural selection in humans
height (+), infant head circumference (+), some biomolecular stuff, female hip size (+), male BMI (-), age of menarche (+, !!), and birth weight (+)

Strong selection in the recent past can cause allele frequencies to change significantly. Consider two different SNPs, which today have equal minor allele frequency (for simplicity, let this be equal to one half). Assume that one SNP was subject to strong recent selection, and another (neutral) has had approximately zero effect on fitness. The advantageous version of the first SNP was less common in the far past, and rose in frequency recently (e.g., over the last 2k years). In contrast, the two versions of the neutral SNP have been present in roughly the same proportion (up to fluctuations) for a long time. Consequently, in the total past breeding population (i.e., going back tens of thousands of years) there have been many more copies of the neutral alleles (and the chunks of DNA surrounding them) than of the positively selected allele. Each of the chunks of DNA around the SNPs we are considering is subject to a roughly constant rate of mutation.

Looking at the current population, one would then expect a larger variety of mutations in the DNA region surrounding the neutral allele (both versions) than near the favored selected allele (which was rarer in the population until very recently, and whose surrounding region had fewer chances to accumulate mutations). By comparing the difference in local mutational diversity between the two versions of the neutral allele (should be zero modulo fluctuations, for the case MAF = 0.5), and between the (+) and (-) versions of the selected allele (nonzero, due to relative change in frequency), one obtains a sensitive signal for recent selection. See figure at bottom for more detail. In the paper what I call mutational diversity is measured by looking at distance distribution of singletons, which are rare variants found in only one individual in the sample under study.

The 2,000 year selection of the British: http://www.unz.com/gnxp/the-2000-year-selection-of-the-british/

Detection of human adaptation during the past 2,000 years: http://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2016/05/07/052084

The key idea is that recent selection distorts the ancestral genealogy of sampled haplotypes at a selected site. In particular, the terminal (tip) branches of the genealogy tend to be shorter for the favored allele than for the disfavored allele, and hence, haplotypes carrying the favored allele will tend to carry fewer singleton mutations (Fig. 1A-C and SOM).

To capture this effect, we use the sum of distances to the nearest singleton in each direction from a test SNP as a summary statistic (Fig. 1D).

Figure 1. Illustration of the SDS method.

Figure 2. Properties of SDS.

Based on a recent model of European demography [25], we estimate that the mean tip length for a neutral sample of 3,000 individuals is 75 generations, or roughly 2,000 years (Fig. 2A). Since SDS aims to measure changes in tip lengths of the genealogy, we conjectured that it would be most likely to detect selection approximately within this timeframe.

Indeed, in simulated sweep models with samples of 3,000 individuals (Fig. 2B,C and fig. S2), we find that SDS focuses specifically on very recent time scales, and has equal power for hard and soft sweeps within this timeframe. At individual loci, SDS is powered to detect ~2% selection over 100 generations. Moreover, SDS has essentially no power to detect older selection events that stopped >100 generations before the present. In contrast, a commonly-used test for hard sweeps, iHS [12], integrates signal over much longer timescales (>1,000 generations), has no specificity to the more recent history, and has essentially no power for the soft sweep scenarios.

Catching evolution in the act with the Singleton Density Score: http://www.molecularecologist.com/2016/05/catching-evolution-in-the-act-with-the-singleton-density-score/
The Singleton Density Score (SDS) is a measure based on the idea that changes in allele frequencies induced by recent selection can be observed in a sample’s genealogy as differences in the branch length distribution.

You don’t need a weatherman: https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2016/05/08/you-dont-need-a-weatherman/
You can do a million cool things with this method. Since the effective time scale goes inversely with sample size, you could look at evolution in England over the past 1000 years or the past 500. Differencing, over the period 1-1000 AD. Since you can look at polygenic traits, you can see whether the alleles favoring higher IQs have increased or decreased in frequency over various stretches of time. You can see if Greg Clark’s proposed mechanism really happened. You can (soon) tell if creeping Pinkerization is genetic, or partly genetic.

You could probably find out if the Middle Easterners really have gotten slower, and when it happened.

Looking at IQ alleles, you could not only show whether the Ashkenazi Jews really are biologically smarter but if so, when it happened, which would give you strong hints as to how it happened.

We know that IQ-favoring alleles are going down (slowly) right now (not counting immigration, which of course drastically speeds it up). Soon we will know if this was true while Russia was under the Mongol yoke – we’ll know how smart Periclean Athenians were and when that boost occurred. And so on. And on!

...

“The pace has been so rapid that humans have changed significantly in body and mind over recorded history."

bicameral mind: https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2016/05/08/you-dont-need-a-weatherman/#comment-78934

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2016/05/08/you-dont-need-a-weatherman/#comment-78939
Chinese, Koreans, Japanese and Ashkenazi Jews all have high levels of myopia. Australian Aborigines have almost none, I think.

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2016/05/08/you-dont-need-a-weatherman/#comment-79094
I expect that the fall of all great empires is based on long term dysgenic trends. There is no logical reason why so many empires and civilizations throughout history could grow so big and then not simply keep growing, except for dysgenics.
--
I can think of about twenty other possible explanations off the top of my head, but dysgenics is a possible cause.
--
I agree with DataExplorer. The largest factor in the decay of civilizations is dysgenics. The discussion by R. A. Fisher 1930 p. 193 is very cogent on this matter. Soon we will know for sure.
--
Sometimes it can be rapid. Assume that the upper classes are mostly urban, and somewhat sharper than average. Then the Mongols arrive.
sapiens  study  genetics  evolution  hsu  trends  data  visualization  recent-selection  methodology  summary  GWAS  2016  scitariat  britain  commentary  embodied  biodet  todo  control  multi  gnxp  pop-diff  stat-power  mutation  hypothesis-testing  stats  age-generation  QTL  gene-drift  comparison  marginal  aDNA  simulation  trees  time  metrics  density  measurement  conquest-empire  pinker  population-genetics  aphorism  simler  dennett  👽  the-classics  iron-age  mediterranean  volo-avolo  alien-character  russia  medieval  spearhead  gregory-clark  bio  preprint  domestication  MENA  iq  islam  history  poast  west-hunter  scale  behavioral-gen  gotchas  cost-benefit  genomics  bioinformatics  stylized-facts  concept  levers  🌞  pop-structure  nibble  explanation  ideas  usa  dysgenics  list  applicability-prereqs  cohesion  judaism  visuo  correlation  china  asia  japan  korea  civilization  gibbon  rot  roots  fisher  giants  books  old-anglo  selection  agri-mindset  hari-seldon  disease 
august 2016 by nhaliday
Coefficient of relationship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
relatedness by consanguinity

Average percent DNA shared between relatives – 23andMe Customer Care: https://customercare.23andme.com/hc/en-us/articles/212170668-Average-percent-DNA-shared-between-relatives
summary of relatedness by consanguinity
shouldn't it be 2^-4 ~ 6% for first cousins?
wiki  sapiens  reference  genetics  evolution  concept  cheatsheet  kinship  metrics  intersection-connectedness  multi  brands  biotech  data  graphs  trees  magnitude  identity  estimate  measurement  inference 
july 2016 by nhaliday
soft question - How do you not forget old math? - MathOverflow
Terry Tao:
I find that blogging about material that I would otherwise forget eventually is extremely valuable in this regard. (I end up consulting my own blog posts on a regular basis.) EDIT: and now I remember I already wrote on this topic: terrytao.wordpress.com/career-advice/write-down-what-youve-d‌​one

fedja:
The only way to cope with this loss of memory I know is to do some reading on systematic basis. Of course, if you read one paper in algebraic geometry (or whatever else) a month (or even two months), you may not remember the exact content of all of them by the end of the year but, since all mathematicians in one field use pretty much the same tricks and draw from pretty much the same general knowledge, you'll keep the core things in your memory no matter what you read (provided it is not patented junk, of course) and this is about as much as you can hope for.

Relating abstract things to "real life stuff" (and vice versa) is automatic when you work as a mathematician. For me, the proof of the Chacon-Ornstein ergodic theorem is just a sandpile moving over a pit with the sand falling down after every shift. I often tell my students that every individual term in the sequence doesn't matter at all for the limit but somehow together they determine it like no individual human is of any real importance while together they keep this civilization running, etc. No special effort is needed here and, moreover, if the analogy is not natural but contrived, it'll not be helpful or memorable. The standard mnemonic techniques are pretty useless in math. IMHO (the famous "foil" rule for the multiplication of sums of two terms is inferior to the natural "pair each term in the first sum with each term in the second sum" and to the picture of a rectangle tiled with smaller rectangles, though, of course, the foil rule sounds way more sexy).

One thing that I don't think the other respondents have emphasized enough is that you should work on prioritizing what you choose to study and remember.

Timothy Chow:
As others have said, forgetting lots of stuff is inevitable. But there are ways you can mitigate the damage of this information loss. I find that a useful technique is to try to organize your knowledge hierarchically. Start by coming up with a big picture, and make sure you understand and remember that picture thoroughly. Then drill down to the next level of detail, and work on remembering that. For example, if I were trying to remember everything in a particular book, I might start by memorizing the table of contents, and then I'd work on remembering the theorem statements, and then finally the proofs. (Don't take this illustration too literally; it's better to come up with your own conceptual hierarchy than to slavishly follow the formal hierarchy of a published text. But I do think that a hierarchical approach is valuable.)

Organizing your knowledge like this helps you prioritize. You can then consciously decide that certain large swaths of knowledge are not worth your time at the moment, and just keep a "stub" in memory to remind you that that body of knowledge exists, should you ever need to dive into it. In areas of higher priority, you can plunge more deeply. By making sure you thoroughly internalize the top levels of the hierarchy, you reduce the risk of losing sight of entire areas of important knowledge. Generally it's less catastrophic to forget the details than to forget about a whole region of the big picture, because you can often revisit the details as long as you know what details you need to dig up. (This is fortunate since the details are the most memory-intensive.)

Having a hierarchy also helps you accrue new knowledge. Often when you encounter something new, you can relate it to something you already know, and file it in the same branch of your mental tree.
thinking  math  growth  advice  expert  q-n-a  🎓  long-term  tradeoffs  scholar  overflow  soft-question  gowers  mathtariat  ground-up  hi-order-bits  intuition  synthesis  visual-understanding  decision-making  scholar-pack  cartoons  lens  big-picture  ergodic  nibble  zooming  trees  fedja  reflection  retention  meta:research  wisdom  skeleton  practice  prioritizing  concrete  s:***  info-dynamics  knowledge  studying  the-trenches  chart  expert-experience  quixotic  elegance  heavyweights 
june 2016 by nhaliday
How Old Are Fairy Tales? - The Atlantic
Many folklorists disagreed. Some have claimed that many classic fairy tales are recent inventions that followed the advent of mass-printed literature. Others noted that human stories, unlike human genes, aren't just passed down vertically through generations, but horizontally within generations. “They’re passed across societies through trade, exchange, migration, and conquest,” says Tehrani. “The consensus was that these processes would have destroyed any deep signatures of descent from ancient ancestral populations.”

Not so. Tehrani and da Silva found that although neighboring cultures can easily exchange stories, they also often reject the tales of their neighbors. Several stories were less likely to appear in one population if they were told within an adjacent one.

Meanwhile, a quarter of the Tales of Magic showed clear signatures of shared descent from ancient ancestors. “Most people would assume that folktales are rapidly changing and easily exchanged between social groups,” says Simon Greenhill from the Australian National University. “But this shows that many tales are actually surprisingly stable over time and seem to track population history well.” Similarly, a recent study found that flood “myths” among Aboriginal Australians can be traced back to real sea level rises 7,000 years ago.

Many of the Tales of Magic were similarly ancient, as the Grimms suggested. Beauty and the Beast and Rumpelstiltskin were first written down in the 17th and 18th centuries respectively, but they are actually between 2,500 and 6,000 years old—not quite tales as old as time, but perhaps as old as wheels and writing.

The Smith and the Devil is probably 6,000 years old, too. In this story, a crafty blacksmith sells his soul to an evil supernatural entity in exchange for awesome smithing powers, which he then uses to leash the entity to an immovable object. The basic tale has been adapted in everything from Faust to blues lore, but the most ancient version, involving the blacksmith, comes from the Bronze Age! It predates the last common ancestor of all Indo-European languages. “It's constantly being updated and recycled, but it's older than Christianity,” says Tehrani.

This result might help to settle a debate about the origins of Indo-European languages. It rules out the idea that these tongues originated among Neolithic farmers, who lived 9,000 years ago in what is now modern Turkey. After all, how could these people, who hadn’t invented metallurgy, have concocted a story where the hero is a blacksmith? A rival hypothesis becomes far more likely: Indo-European languages emerged 5,000 to 6,000 years ago among pastoralists from the Russian steppes, who knew how to work metal.

The Smith and the Devil: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Smith_and_the_Devil
The Smith and the Devil is a European fairy tale. The story is of a smith who makes a pact with a malevolent being—commonly the Devil (in later times), Death or a genie—selling his soul for some power, then tricks the devil out of his prize. In one version, the smith gains the power to weld any materials, then uses this power to stick the devil to an immovable object, allowing the smith to renege on the bargain.[1]

...

According to George Monbiot, the blacksmith is a motif of folklore throughout (and beyond) Europe associated with malevolence (the medieval vision of Hell may draw upon the image the smith at his forge), and several variant tales tell of smiths entering into a pact with the devil to obtain fire and the means of smelting metal.[6]

According to research applying phylogenetic techniques to linguistics by folklorist Sara Graça da Silva and anthropologist Jamie Tehrani,[7] "The Smith and the Devil" may be one of the oldest European folk tales, with the basic plot stable throughout the Indo-European speaking world from India to Scandinavia, possibly being first told in Indo-European 6,000 years ago in the Bronze Age.[1][8][9] Folklorist John Lindow, however, notes that a word for "smith" may not have existed in Indo-European, and if so the tale may not be that old.[9]

https://www.unz.com/akarlin/faustian-europe/
According to phylogenetic analyses, the oldest Indo-European common story features a Smith selling his soul to the Devil in return for power, before tricking him out of his prize.

Which, as a frand observed, later came to be known as the tale of Faust. So Europe is a Faustian civilization in the most direct sense.

Revealed: how Indigenous Australian storytelling accurately records sea level rises 7,000 years ago: http://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2015/sep/16/indigenous-australian-storytelling-records-sea-level-rises-over-millenia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geomythology

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2017/07/26/legends/
I wonder how long oral history lasts. What’s the oldest legend that has some clear fragment of truth in it?

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2017/07/26/legends/#comment-93821
The Black Sea deluge hypothesis, being the origin of the different deluge myths around the Middle East?
--
People have lived in river valleys for a long time now, and they flood. I mean, deluge myths could also go back to the end of the Ice Age, when many lands went underwater as sea level rose. But how can you tell? Now if there was a one-time thing that had a special identifying trait, say purple rain, that might be convincing.

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2017/07/26/legends/#comment-93883
RE: untangling actual historical events and personages from myth and legend,

Obviously, it’s pretty damn tough. In most cases (THE ILIAD, the Pentateuch, etc), we simply lack the proper controls (literary sources written down at a time reasonably close to the events in question). Hence, we have to rely on a combination of archaeology plus intuition.Was a city sacked at roughly the proper time? Does a given individual appear to be based on a real person?

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2017/07/26/legends/#comment-93867
I’m partial to the notion that the “forbidden fruit” was wheat, making the Garden of Eden a story about the dawn of agriculture, and the story of Cain and Abel the first conflict between settled farmer and semi-nomadic pastoralist. That would make it perhaps 6 millennia old when first written down.
--
The story of Cain and Abel is indeed the conflict between the agricultural and pastoral ways of life

same conclusion as me: https://pinboard.in/u:nhaliday/b:9130f5f3c17b

great blog: https://biblicalsausage.wordpress.com/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euhemerus
Euhemerus (also spelled Euemeros or Evemerus; Ancient Greek: Εὐήμερος Euhēmeros, "happy; prosperous"; late fourth century BC), was a Greek mythographer at the court of Cassander, the king of Macedon. Euhemerus' birthplace is disputed, with Messina in Sicily as the most probable location, while others suggest Chios or Tegea.[citation needed]

The philosophy attributed to and named for Euhemerus, euhemerism, holds that many mythological tales can be attributed to historical persons and events, the accounts of which have become altered and exaggerated over time.

Euhemerus's work combined elements of fiction and political utopianism. In the ancient world he was considered an atheist. Early Christian writers, such as Lactantius, used Euhemerus's belief that the ancient gods were originally human to confirm their inferiority regarding the Christian God.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euhemerism
In the ancient skeptic philosophical tradition of Theodorus of Cyrene and the Cyrenaics, Euhemerus forged a new method of interpretation for the contemporary religious beliefs. Though his work is lost, the reputation of Euhemerus was that he believed that much of Greek mythology could be interpreted as natural or historical events subsequently given supernatural characteristics through retelling. Subsequently Euhemerus was considered to be an atheist by his opponents, most notably Callimachus.[7]

...

Euhemerus' views were rooted in the deification of men, usually kings, into gods through apotheosis. In numerous cultures, kings were exalted or venerated into the status of divine beings and worshipped after their death, or sometimes even while they ruled. Dion, the tyrant ruler of Syracuse, was deified while he was alive and modern scholars consider his apotheosis to have influenced Euhemerus' views on the origin of all gods.[8] Euhemerus was also living during the contemporaneous deification of the Seleucids and "pharaoization" of the Ptolemies in a fusion of Hellenic and Egyptian traditions.

...

Hostile to paganism, the early Christians, such as the Church Fathers, embraced euhemerism in attempt to undermine the validity of pagan gods.[13] The usefulness of euhemerist views to early Christian apologists may be summed up in Clement of Alexandria's triumphant cry in Cohortatio ad gentes: "Those to whom you bow were once men like yourselves."[14]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_king
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_cult
culture  history  cocktail  anthropology  news  myth  org:mag  narrative  roots  spreading  theos  archaeology  tradition  multi  climate-change  environment  oceans  h2o  org:lite  anglo  org:anglo  west-hunter  scitariat  accuracy  truth  trees  ed-yong  sapiens  farmers-and-foragers  fluid  trivia  nihil  flux-stasis  time  antiquity  retention  age-generation  estimate  epidemiology  evolution  migration  cultural-dynamics  language  gavisti  foreign-lang  wormholes  religion  christianity  interdisciplinary  fiction  speculation  poast  discussion  writing  speaking  communication  thick-thin  whole-partial-many  literature  analysis  nitty-gritty  blog  stream  deep-materialism  new-religion  apollonian-dionysian  subjective-objective  absolute-relative  hmm  big-peeps  iron-age  the-classics  mediterranean  antidemos  leviathan  sanctity-degradation  signal-noise  stylized-facts  conquest-empire  the-devil  god-man-beast-victim  ideology  illusion  intricacy  tip-of-tongue  exegesis-hermeneutics  interpretation  linguistics  traces  bible  judaism  realness  paganism  sequential  europe  the-gre 
january 2016 by nhaliday

Copy this bookmark:





to read