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The Politics of the Professoriat: Political diversity on campus | CBC Radio
"We've created a hostile climate for people who don't fit in intellectually. We've marginalized them. We've made it clear they don't belong; they're not welcome. And then the really smart ones among them don't apply! And what we're left with is a politically homogeneous field of inquiry, which therefore has problems studying anything that is politically valenced."
– Jonathan Haidt

Why does a "political monoculture" hurt social science research?

ophobophobia = fear of being branded Islamophobic, homophobic, etc. For example, to address poverty/inequality, three factors are critical in why certain groups or individuals do better than others:

1) Whether parents are married (even if you're poor)
2) Subculture that emphasizes importance of education and/or delayed gratification
3) IQ

But though these are the most important determinants, we have not made progress in research, because of ophobophobia: "no one dares address these major factors"; instead, more focus on structural racism, etc. And this issue of poverty/inequality must be solved. But ophobophobia rules out 90% of the causal factors.

"Students and professors know, he adds, that 'if you step out of line at all, you will be called a racist, sexist or homophobe. In fact it’s gotten so bad out there that there’s a new term—‘ophobophobia,’ which is the fear of being called x-ophobic."

"Human beings are tribal creatures. We evolved for small religions....We're really good at making something sacred and trusting each other....You can see this easily with fundamentalist Xians. Some of the them will deny evolution -- seems silly from the outside. You can see the same thing on college campuses. The causes of college campuses are laudable, but we should pursue them practically, pragmatically, and rationally. But "when we make them into a religion, that's when we activate all of our 'religious software', which is a set of mental concepts that include blasphemy, heresy, burning at the stake, witch hunts. The basic language is one of sin, and blasphemy, and punishment. No one speaks up for anyone because then they'll be called a witch.

But there is NO ROLE for religion in the classroom in intellectual matters. There we need communities in which NOTHING is sacred. Now there so much that is sacred on campus, can't be said."

The Religion of Social Justice. Justice is a good thing, but when Social Justice becomes a religion...

IGen believes in the concept that "words are violence".
politics  Podcast  sociology  education  race  inequalities  religion  Speech 
6 weeks ago by oripsolob
The Risks of Social Media Use by Employees, and How Public Employers Can Create Strong Social Media Policies: Foster Swift
FREEDOM OF SPEECH IN PUBLIC SECTOR EMPLOYMENT

Over the years, courts have made a clear distinction between the rights entitled to a private citizen, and a public sector employee. Social media has blurred the lines between professional and personal life. The First Amendment guarantees free speech rights, but it is not without limits. This is true both online and offline.

In order to challenge an employment-related decision under the First Amendment, a public sector employee must (1) show their speech addresses a matter of public concern, and (2) show free-speech interests outweigh the employer’s efficiency interests.

If an employee can show that comments made through social media involve a matter of public concern, courts will evaluate whether the speech:

Impairs discipline or harmony among co-workers.
Has a detrimental impact on close working relationships for which personal loyalty and confidence are necessary.
Interferes with the normal operation of the employer’s business.
free  Speech  Social  Media  constitution 
july 2018 by oripsolob
Public Employees, Private Speech: 1st Amendment doesn't always protect government workers
Nonetheless, public employees often lose free speech cases because courts defer to an employer’s judgment that the employee’s inflammatory posts will cause disharmony or make the public view the public employer with derision or disrespect.

COMMUNITY CONCERNS
When a public employee’s posts create a real fear of backlash from the community, courts often defer to the employer’s judgments. “For example, I think such concerns are especially strong where a police officer’s off-duty speech—on social media or elsewhere—undermines a police department’s ability credibly to communicate its commitment to evenhanded law enforcement regardless of race,” Norton explains. “For example, consider the message sent to the public if a police chief were to march in a Klan parade while off duty—or sends a series of racist tweets.”
free  Speech  constitution  Social  Media 
july 2018 by oripsolob
To Tweet or not to Tweet: Government Employees and Social Media | Freedom Forum Institute
1) First of all, government employees are only protected by the First Amendment when they are speaking as private citizens. If their speech is part of their official job duties, then they can be fired or disciplined for it.

This rule comes from a 2006 Supreme Court case, Garcetti v. Ceballos. Obviously, it isn’t always easy to differentiate when a government employee is speaking as a private citizen, and when they are speaking as a government employee.

The Supreme Court established this as a necessary element for a government employee’s speech to be protected by the First Amendment in Pickering v. Board of Education. In a later case, Connick v. Myers, the Supreme Court instructed that the question of whether an employee’s speech addresses a matter of public concern should be determined by looking at the content, form, and context of a given statement, as revealed by the whole record, and not by applying a common, standardized rule. The Court also said that this was a question of law, meaning that it should be left to the court to decide, not a jury.

3) If a government employee was speaking as a private citizen on a matter of public concern, the next question is whether the government employer’s interest in efficiently fulfilling its public services is greater than the employee’s interest in speaking freely.

4) Special Note: Federal government employees have extra restrictions on their speech, which are imposed by the Hatch Act.

The Hatch Act, or the Act to Prevent Pernicious Political Activities, was passed in 1939. The purpose of the Hatch Act was to prevent federal employees from engaging in partisan political activities, such as endorsing particular political candidates.
Speech  constitution  Social  Media 
july 2018 by oripsolob
Government Employees Get to Have Opinions, Too | American Civil Liberties Union
What do federal employees remain free to say? The Supreme Court has stated clearly that public employees cannot be fired for speaking on issues of public concern as private individuals. Practically speaking, this means that – with the possible exception of certain high-ranking government officials – an employee can speak on personal time and in a personal capacity about matters that affect the public. Their protections are strongest when they are speaking about issues that do not relate to their job duties. For example, a scientist who works at the Environmental Protection Agency is free to research and write academic papers on her own time, which she can then publish under her own name. A State Department employee can attend a local school board meeting and express support for a measure being proposed. To the extent their speech meets the above requirements, employees can even speak anonymously. (One Twitter account that launched last night seems to be run by a handful of National Park Service rangers apparently writing during their personal time.)

DEMAND TRANSPARENCY FROM TRUMP

DEMAND TRANSPARENCY These are general rules, and there are exceptions, such as when an employee’s speech causes disruption to the workplace. But properly construed, any exceptions should apply only in those cases where the government’s interest in carrying out its duties is truly impaired by what an employee has said.  
Social  Media  constitution  Speech 
july 2018 by oripsolob
Public Employee’s Offensive Social Media Comments Unprotected
Although the court resolved the balancing test in favor of the employer in this case, it emphasized that government employees do not necessarily lose their right to free speech by working for the government and expressly cautioned that an employer's interest in maintaining efficiency will not always outweigh the interests of an employee in speaking on matters of public concern.

Grutzmacher v. Howard County, Md., 4th Cir., No. 15-2066 (March 20, 2017).

Professional Pointer: While the employer won this case, employers nevertheless should be careful when drafting and enforcing social media policies so that they do not interfere unnecessarily with employees' First Amendment rights.  
Social  Media  Speech  constitution 
july 2018 by oripsolob
School Walkouts: Teens Say ‘We’re Fighting For Our Lives’ | WBEZ
Schools across Chicago have been grappling with how best to respond to the walkouts and have come up with a range of response and approaches.

Many school districts are embracing a role in the national gun debate, and are either supporting or tolerating student walkouts. That includes Chicago Public Schools and New Trier High School on the North Shore, where the teen organizers said students can protest or get a free period — no student will face consequences for either participating or not participating in the walkout.

A smaller number of school districts are actively discouraging walkouts, and a few are threatening discipline for students who participate.
Speech  education  Student 
march 2018 by oripsolob
Report: At least 50 teams were paid by Department of Defense for patriotic displays - The Washington Post
The 145-page report cites contributions to 18 NFL teams, 10 MLB teams, eight NBA teams, six NHL teams, eight soccer teams, as well as NASCAR, Iron Dog and Indiana University Purdue University.

The Atlanta Falcons, for instance, were the top recipients, getting $879,000 over four years. Over the same period, for instance, the New England Patriots received $700,000 and the Buffalo Bills $650,000.
sociology  Media  literacy  Speech  Money 
october 2017 by oripsolob
How the NFL sold patriotism to the U.S. military for millions – ThinkProgress
What the president failed to acknowledge in his rant was that many of the military displays present at NFL games were, at one time, financed by the government. Rather than organic, wholesome expressions of patriotism — the kind Trump has claimed NFL players are disrespectfully protesting — the tradition of players standing for the national anthem is a recent tradition that may have coincided with a marketing ploy meant to sell cheap, manufactured nationalism.

As recently as 2015, the Department of Defense was doling out millions to the NFL for such things as military flyovers, flag unfurlings, emotional color guard ceremonies, enlistment campaigns, and — interestingly enough — national anthem performances. Additionally, according to Vice, the NFL’s policy on players standing for the national anthem also changed in 2009, with athletes “encouraged” thereafter to participate. Prior to that, teams were not given any specific instructions on the matter; some chose to remain in the locker room until after opening ceremonies were completed. (It’s unclear whether the policy change was implemented as a direct result of any Defense Department contracts.)
sociology  history  Speech  Media  literacy  Money 
october 2017 by oripsolob
A silent protest parade in 1917 set the stage for civil rights marches | Miami Herald
"The only sounds were those of muffled drums, the shuffling of feet and the gentle sobs of some of the estimated 20,000 onlookers. The women and children wore all white. The men dressed in black.

On the afternoon of Saturday, July 28, 1917, nearly 10,000 African-Americans marched down Fifth Avenue, in silence, to protest racial violence and white supremacy in the United States.

New York City, and the nation, had never before witnessed such a remarkable scene.

The “Silent Protest Parade,” as it came to be known, was the first mass African-American demonstration of its kind and marked a watershed moment in the history of the civil rights movement."

Ultimate cause of the CRM

Prior to the “Silent Protest Parade,” mob violence and the lynching of African-Americans had grown even more gruesome. In Waco, a mob of 10,000 white Texans attended the May 15, 1916, lynching of a black farmer, Jesse Washington. One year later, on May 22, 1917, a black woodcutter, Ell Persons, died at the hands of over 5,000 vengeance-seeking whites in Memphis.

Even by these grisly standards, East St. Louis later that same summer was shocking. Simmering labor tensions between white and black workers exploded on the evening of July 2, 1917.

For 24 hours, white mobs indiscriminately stabbed, shot and lynched anyone with black skin. Men, women, children, the elderly, the disabled — no one was spared. Homes were torched and occupants shot down as they attempted to flee. The death toll likely ran as high as 200 people.
race  inequalities  history  Speech  constitution 
july 2017 by oripsolob
“The Drum Major Instinct"**
The inspiration for Mavis Staples' MLK Song
history  speech 
january 2017 by oripsolob
Mandatory Union Fees Getting Hard Look by Supreme Court - The New York Times
Logical fallacy of false equivalence: “I get to choose what movie I want to go see,” Mr. Elrich said. “I get to choose what church I want to go to. I get to choose what gym I want to join.” He should have the same choice, he said, about whether to support a union. Kamala D. Harris, California’s attorney general, told the justices in a brief that workers who objected to the positions taken by unions suffered no First Amendment injuries because “they remain free to communicate their views to school officials, their colleagues and the public at large.”
labor  money  education  speech  constitution 
january 2016 by oripsolob
Slavery’s Long Shadow - The New York Times
“Why Doesn’t the United States Have a European-style Welfare State?” Its authors — who are not, by the way, especially liberal — explored a number of hypotheses, but eventually concluded that race is central, because in America programs that help the needy are all too often seen as programs that help Those People: “Within the United States, race is the single most important predictor of support for welfare. America’s troubled race relations are clearly a major reason for the absence of an American welfare state.”
race  speech  history 
june 2015 by oripsolob
NPR making changes to voice of underwriting credits | Current.org
The announcement of Farhi’s hire on NPR.org, accompanied by a sampler reel of her voice, prompted complaints about vocal fry. And founding Morning Edition editor William Drummond said on Current’s The Pub podcast last week that Farhi’s voice is “different in a pejorative sense.”
npr  gender  women  inequalities  speech 
february 2015 by oripsolob
Can Students Have Too Much Tech? - NYTimes.com
The problem is the differential impact on children from poor families. Babies born to low-income parents spend at least 40 percent of their waking hours in front of a screen — more than twice the time spent by middle-class babies. They also get far less cuddling and bantering over family meals than do more privileged children. The give-and-take of these interactions is what predicts robust vocabularies and school success. Apps and videos don’t. If children who spend more time with electronic devices are also more likely to be out of sync with their peers’ behavior and learning by the fourth grade, why would adding more viewing and clicking to their school days be considered a good idea?
shallows  education  technology  class  inequalities  sociology  ais  speech  politics 
january 2015 by oripsolob
The Great War - BackStory with the American History Guys
World War I was sometimes called “the war to end all wars.” But a hundred years after the fighting began, it’s become a war that’s often forgotten in American history, or viewed as a prelude to WWII. In this episode, we explore some of the ways the conflict affected Americans far beyond the battlefields of Europe — from debates about the meaning of free speech (featuring Geoffrey Stone), to the fight over how the war would be remembered. Special attention to the struggles of African-Americans and the legacy of the Progressive Movement.
radio  npr  history  ais  speech  constitution  race  women 
august 2014 by oripsolob
Frederick Douglass' Fourth of July Speech | BackStory with the American History Guys
Historian David Blight narrates a reenactment of Frederick Douglass’ 1852 speech, “The Meaning of the Fourth of July for the Negro,” widely known as one of the greatest Abolitionist speeches ever. In it, Douglass highlights the hypocrisy of celebrating liberty in a nation that allows slavery.
history  speech  race 
may 2013 by oripsolob
Free Speech, Context, and Visibility: Protesting Racist Ads
On Tuesday, Egyptian-American activist Mona Eltahawy was arrested for "criminal mischief" - or "the willful damaging of property" - when she responded to disturbingly racist ads that were posted in the New York City subway system with spray paint.
religion  2012  constitution  video  AIS  speech 
september 2012 by oripsolob
Un-Convention-al Coverage: Heidi Boghosian | Smiley & West
Heidi Boghosian, executive director of the National Lawyers Guild, reveals the dark tactics at both conventions to quiet protests outside, including the use of “free speech zones”.
9/11  conference  constitution  speech 
september 2012 by oripsolob
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