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Here's What's Become Of A Historic All-Black Town (Mound Bayou) In The Mississippi Delta : NPR
Teddy Roosevelt proclaimed it "The Jewel of the Delta."

Booker T. Washington praised it as a model of "thrift and self-government."

Mound Bayou, in the Mississippi Delta: a town founded in 1887 by former slaves, with a vision that was revolutionary for its time.

From the start, it was designed to be a self-reliant, autonomous, all-black community.

For decades, Mound Bayou thrived and prospered, becoming famous for empowering its black citizens. The town also became known as a haven from the virulent racism of the Jim Crow South.

"It's almost like it was an inverted or alternate universe, where being black was a positive thing," says Rolando Herts, director of the Delta Center for Culture and Learning at Delta State University.
history  race  inequalities 
yesterday by oripsolob
Segregation in the Armed Forces During World War II and the Double V Campaign || The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross
Two months to the day after Pearl Harbor (Feb. 7, 1942), the most widely read black newspaper in America, the Pittsburgh Courier, found a way to split the difference — actually, the newspaper cleverly intertwined them into a symbol and a national campaign that urged black people to give their all for the war effort, while at the same time calling on the government to do all it could to make the rhetoric of the Declaration of Independence and the equal rights amendments to the Constitution real for every citizen, regardless of race. And in honor of the battle against enemies from without and within, they called it “the Double V Campaign.”
War  race  history  inequalities 
yesterday by oripsolob
The Second Middle Passage || The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross
That second forced migration was known as the domestic, or internal, slave trade: “In the seven decades between the ratification of the Constitution [in 1787] and the Civil War [1861],” the historian Walter Johnson tells us in his book Soul by Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market, “approximately one million enslaved people were relocated from the upper South to the lower South … two thirds of these through … the domestic slave trade.” In other words, two and a half times more African Americans were directly affected by the second Middle Passage than the first one.
race  history  Economics  inequalities 
yesterday by oripsolob
The Truth Behind '40 Acres and a Mule' || The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross
It is difficult to stress adequately how revolutionary this idea was: As the historian Eric Foner puts it in his book, Reconstruction: America’s Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877, “Here in coastal South Carolina and Georgia, the prospect beckoned of a transformation of Southern society more radical even than the end of slavery.”
War  race  history  inequalities 
yesterday by oripsolob
Derek Black and Matthew Stevenson — How Friendship and Quiet Conversations Transformed a White Nationalist - The On Being Project
Sociology Sal:
Retweeted Krista Tippett
This was a great episode. For #teachsoc it highlights ingroups/outgroups, stereotypes, and the importance of personal connection. #race
inequalities  sociology  race  Podcast  NPR 
3 days ago by oripsolob
Emmett Till’s Murder, and How America Remembers Its Darkest Moments - The New York Times
He walked into a store and it changed civil rights. That crumbling store has come to symbolize the struggle to address the nation’s racial violence.

MONEY, Miss. — Along the edge of Money Road, across from the railroad tracks, an old grocery store rots.

In August 1955, a 14-year-old black boy visiting from Chicago walked in to buy candy. After being accused of whistling at the white woman behind the counter, he was later kidnapped, tortured, lynched and dumped in the Tallahatchie River.

The murder of Emmett Till is remembered as one of the most hideous hate crimes of the 20th century, a brutal episode in American history that helped kindle the civil rights movement. And the place where it all began, Bryant’s Grocery & Meat Market, is still standing. Barely.
race  history  inequalities  Video 
26 days ago by oripsolob
How We Analyzed Video Gambling in Illinois | ProPublica Illinois
More often than not, video gambling machines are found in lower-income communities, our analysis of demographic data found. Devices can be found in Berwyn but not Oak Park, Waukegan but not Lake Forest, Harvey but not Palos Park. In fact, as the average income level of a community decreases, the average number of machines increases. The city of Chicago does not allow gambling machines within the city limits and has therefore been excluded from this analysis.

We found a significant negative correlation between the number of video gambling machines and the average household income of a city and a county.
Games  Video  sociology  class  inequalities 
28 days ago by oripsolob
How We Analyzed Video Gambling in Illinois | ProPublica Illinois
The first story in the series, published Jan. 16, looks at the finances behind the expansion of video gambling. For this story, we conducted a demographic analysis of where machines are distributed. The analysis found the number of machines increases as the average income level of the community decreases.
sociology  class  inequalities  Games 
28 days ago by oripsolob
'Unexampled Courage' Tells The Story That Inspired Integration Of U.S. Armed Forces : NPR
Isaac Woodard, Judge Jay Waties Waring (aristocratic descendant of slaveowners), and Harry Truman

Waring: "I had to decide whether I was going to be ruled by white supremacy or be a federal judge and decide the law."

Dissented in the landmark 1951 Briggs v. Elliott case.

Though the plaintiffs lost the case before the three judge panel which voted 2-1 for the defendants, Waring's eloquent dissent, and his phrase, "Segregation is per se inequality" set the stage for 1954 Brown v. Board.
race  politics  history  inequalities  War  NPR 
4 weeks ago by oripsolob
Female slaveholders profited as much as men, according to a new book.
Married women, who under the legal doctrine of coverture were not commonly allowed to hold property once they had husbands, petitioned courts to gain economic rights to the enslaved people they had owned before marriage—and judges often agreed with their pleas.

The stories from WPA narratives show that from the perspective of the enslaved, female slaveholders weren’t much different from their male counterparts. Many of them were just as physically cruel as men, and they didn’t hesitate to make decisions to “sell away” enslaved people or their relatives. Stories of women who whipped enslaved people with nettleweed or fed enslaved children spoiled meat, and an entire heartbreaking chapter about the practice of separating enslaved women from their infants so that they could act as wet nurses for their mistresses’ offspring, make it clear that Southern women who owned people weren’t kind “mothers” making the best of a bad situation. “If we look carefully at slave-owning women’s management styles, we find that these differed little from those used by slaveholding men—and they rarely treated enslaved people as their children,” Jones-Rogers writes.
women  history  race  inequalities 
4 weeks ago by oripsolob
The Gap | National Low Income Housing Coalition
No State Has an Adequate Supply of Affordable Rental Housing for the Lowest Income Renters
class  sociology  inequalities  housing 
4 weeks ago by oripsolob
Smart Justice: An Animated Series on Vimeo
Three short videos: 1) Life w/o parole, 2) Life after incarceration, and 3) Bail
prisons  race  women  gender  inequalities  videos 
5 weeks ago by oripsolob
Opinion | Why Girls Beat Boys at School and Lose to Them at the Office - The New York Times
As a psychologist who works with teenagers, I hear this concern often from the parents of many of my patients. They routinely remark that their sons do just enough to keep the adults off their backs, while their daughters relentlessly grind, determined to leave no room for error. The girls don’t stop until they’ve polished each assignment to a high shine and rewritten their notes with color-coded precision.

We need to ask: What if school is a confidence factory for our sons, but only a competence factory for our daughters?
gender  education  inequalities  sociology 
5 weeks ago by oripsolob
Photo series asks teens to edit photos until they're 'social media ready' - INSIDER
A photo series has shown the lengths some young people go to to edit their appearance before posting pictures on social media platforms like Instagram — and the results are pretty shocking.

The project, entitled Selfie Harm, saw renowned British photographer Rankin photograph 15 British teens aged 13-19.

The teens were then asked to spend five minutes editing the photo until they thought it looked "social media-ready."

The shots show not only how simple it is to change your appearance in a few minutes (thanks to the plethora of apps available nowadays), but also the pressure young people are under to look a certain way.
sociology  Social  Media  inequalities  gender  photos  editor 
6 weeks ago by oripsolob
Owned, A Tale of Two Americas | Gene Siskel Film Center
The dark side of the middle class ideal of home ownership, a bedrock component of the
American Dream, is explored with briskly-paced verve, giving this twisty tale of myth-making,
entrenched racism, and financial manipulation an urgent vibrancy.  The explosive growth of
post-WWII suburbia, exemplified by developments like Levittown, launched legions of returning
white G.I.s into a class upgrade that made them lords of the lawnmower and backyard grill,
while minorities were simultaneously being barred from the giddy prosperity party of the Fifties
by practices that included extensive redlining and covenant deeds that mandated racial and ethnic
exclusions.  Director Angelini (producer of MY FRIEND DAHMER) moves forward through
the decades to link house flipping, the McMansion craze, underwater mortgages, and the 2008
crash with the widening gap between the haves and have-nots.  DCP digital.
housing  sociology  race  inequalities 
8 weeks ago by oripsolob
Inside the GM plant where nooses and 'whites-only' signs intimidated workers - CNN
Boyd and other workers of color learned there was a coded language to talk about them, according to the lawsuit. White employees kept calling them "Dan." They thought some people didn't respect them enough to learn their names. But other colleagues told them it was a slur, an acronym for "dumb ass nigger."

The N-word was a regular part of life at Toledo Powertrain, where components are made for various Chevrolet, Buick, GMC and Cadillac vehicles, Boyd said. A white woman seen walking with him later found "Nigger lover" written on her pizza box.

It wasn't just Boyd and Brooks complaining. Another employee made a police report about the nooses and conversations about guns being brought to work. Others filed complaints with the Ohio Civil Rights Commission.

The commission, which enforces state laws against discrimination, announced the findings of a nine-month investigation last March: GM *did* allow a racially hostile environment.
race  sociology  Corporation  inequalities 
8 weeks ago by oripsolob
Why we still need John Berger’s Ways of Seeing | Dazed
But it’s Berger’s discussion of how we look at women which resonates most strongly in our current image-obsessed society. Today, the idea of the male gaze may seem well established, and Berger and his all-male team didn’t claim to invent the concept which would later be christened by film critic Laura Mulvey.
gender  women  sociology  inequalities  Video  tv  advertising 
10 weeks ago by oripsolob
Displaced: When the Eisenhower Expressway Moved in, Who Was Forced Out?
Mom lived at 623 S. Halsted.

Eisenhower Expressway built between 1949 and 1961. Displaced 13,000 people and 400 businesses.

Near West Side: "the community population of 50,000 includes chiefly persons of Italian, Mexican, Greek, Jewish, and Negro ancestry.”

“There was a tight-knit Greek community,” says Harry Lalagos, who was born in 1944 and lived at 642 S. Blue Island Ave. “Everybody knew everybody, and everybody had cousins and relatives that all lived in the same area. … My dad had a store down there, a grocery store and a restaurant.”

“Our doors were always open,” says Harry’s younger sister, Demetra Lalagos. “People were just popping in and out. … Everybody got along.”

But then came the expressway. “I remember the construction equipment digging down and putting in the overpasses,” Harry says. “If you were standing on the Halsted Street overpass and looking west, you would see the overpasses at Morgan Street and Racine, but it was just all dirt. And every one of the underpasses would flood from the rain. … We'd build a raft and just float around in there.”

The expressway wasn’t the only project that tore up Greektown and Little Italy. A decade later, even more people — including the Lalagos family — were forced out when the University of Illinois built a campus there. “That is what really broke up the Greektown area,” Demetra says. “It was a sad time.”

Their father was forced to close his business around 1959, and the family moved near North and Harlem avenues. “It broke his heart to move out of there, because it was his life,” Harry says.

Greektown’s surviving businesses shifted north of where they had been. “As far as the residential part of it, pretty much all of the people had scattered to different parts of the city,” Harry says.
history  chicago  sociology  inequalities 
12 weeks ago by oripsolob
How white racism destroys black wealth - The Washington Post
In the end, they were left with one number: $48,000.

That’s the amount the average home in a majority-black neighborhood is undervalued, relative to an identical home in an identical all-white neighborhood once you properly adjust for all the other structural and neighborhood characteristics that could plausibly affect that number. That’s the “cost of racial bias,” as the authors put it, “amounting to $156 billion in cumulative losses” accruing to black homeowners.
housing  race  inequalities  sociology 
november 2018 by oripsolob
Walking-to-Work Stories: Heartwarming or Harmful? | On the Media | WNYC Studios
We begin this week's transit-oriented theme show with a story of Good Samaritans and gratitude. Specifically, the beloved, "heartwarming" media trope of the person who walks miles and miles and miles to work — usually out of heartbreaking necessity — and is rewarded for their perseverance with a car, or a bike, or at least an appearance on the 5 o'clock news. Uplifting as these tales may sometimes be, they are also "terrible," as Streetsblog national reporter Angie Schmitt explained to Brooke.
story  race  class  car  sociology  inequalities  NPR  Podcast  radio  Media 
november 2018 by oripsolob
How Black Citizenship Was Won, and Lost - The New York Times
“Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow,” an exhibition about Reconstruction and its aftermath at the New-York Historical Society through March 3, doesn’t draw explicit parallels to today’s politics. But perhaps it doesn’t have to.

“The struggle over who has the right to citizenship and who belongs has been at the heart of American life over centuries,” Marci Reaven, vice president of history exhibitions at the museum, said on a recent afternoon.

Reconstruction can be a challenging story to tell, given how it cuts against deeply held American ideas about steady moral progress. It can also seem like a very abstract story, dominated by Constitutional amendments, legal battles and court decisions.
race  history  inequalities  constitution 
november 2018 by oripsolob
Great American High School: Reforming the Nation’s Remaining Low-Performing High Schools | America's Promise Alliance
Over the last two decades, the number of low-performing high schools has been cut in half, as high school graduation rates have reached an all-time high. While graduation at the remaining low-performing high schools still is just a 50-50 proposition, these schools make up a small percentage of high schools throughout the country, totaling just 10 percent of all traditional high schools enrolling 300 or more students.

From this progress, a clear vision emerges on how high schools can be reformed to once again serve as engines of economic and community development. This is why the Great American High School report, authored by Civic Enterprises and the Everyone Graduates Center at the Johns Hopkins University, was released in partnership with America’s Promise Alliance and the Alliance for Excellent Education, as part of the GradNation campaign working to increase the national on-time graduation rate to 90 percent.
education  inequalities  sociology 
october 2018 by oripsolob
Exclusive: we re-ran polls from 1991 on Anita Hill, this time on Christine Blasey Ford - Vox
The answer might seem obvious, but some of Kavanaugh’s defenders have argued that he should be confirmed — even if guilty. The understandably pseudonymous Federalist contributor Soren Midgley has argued that “what we know about Kavanaugh’s record for the last 30 years of his life tells us the realized negative consequences would be minimal if he were actually guilty.” Washington Post columnist Megan McArdle has gone further, stating, “I would be cool with a teen murderer getting a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court.”

Americans at large took a different stand in October 1991, and take a mostly identical one today. In both cases, a minority of 31-33 percent say that the allegations, if true, shouldn’t disqualify Thomas/Kavanaugh from the court, while 67-69 percent argue they should.

It’s easy, especially in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein revelations and #MeToo, to assume that the American public takes allegations of sexual harassment and assault more seriously than it did decades ago. And some parts of our survey confirm that, especially the findings that American voters think less of Trump and of senators who support Kavanaugh.

But in the crucial matter of whether a true accusation of sexual assault is important enough to derail a nomination, things haven’t changed much since 1991.

In part because of the demographic makeup of the parties, there are significant gaps based on age, race, and church attendance as well. Eighty-four percent of black respondents and 75 percent of Hispanic respondents say a true allegation is enough to reject, compared to 66 percent of whites. 78 percent of people between 18 and 30 said a true allegation would be enough, compared to 63 percent of people 66 or older.
politics  gender  women  inequalities  history  sociology 
october 2018 by oripsolob
The rape culture of the 1980s, explained by Sixteen Candles - Vox
Here are the basic ideas embedded in this plot:

• Girls who drink are asking for it. Girls who have sex are asking for it. Girls who go to parties are asking for it. They are asking for it even if they only drink and have sex and party with their monogamous boyfriends. Whatever happens to that kind of girl as a result is funny.

• Boys are owed girls. A good guy will help his nerdy bro to get a girl. Her consent is not necessary or desired.

• To avoid being the kind of girl who gets raped, you need to earn male approval. If you earn male approval, other girls might be raped, but you won’t be, and that will prove that you are special.

• Once you earn male approval, it can be taken away — as Caroline’s goes away once Jake tires of her — and then you’ll go from being the kind of girl who doesn’t get raped to the kind of girl who does.

• A good guy can participate in this whole system and remain an unsullied dream guy.

• The kind of girl who gets raped has no right to complain about what happens to her. Also it isn’t rape.

That’s how mainstream culture presented rape, and thus affirmed rape culture, in 1984.
culture  sociology  movies  gender  inequalities 
october 2018 by oripsolob
Opportunity Insights
"Translating Research Into Policy Action to Increase Upward Mobility"
class  race  sociology  inequalities  Map 
october 2018 by oripsolob
The Opportunity Atlas
Could be connected to the Social Class Stations activity, adding the dimension of race.
Map  sociology  class  inequalities  race 
october 2018 by oripsolob
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