recentpopularlog in

oripsolob : social   445

« earlier  
Facial recognition's 'dirty little secret': Millions of online photos scraped without consent
Facial recognition can log you into your iPhone, track criminals through crowds and identify loyal customers in stores.

The technology — which is imperfect but improving rapidly — is based on algorithms that learn how to recognize human faces and the hundreds of ways in which each one is unique.

To do this well, the algorithms must be fed hundreds of thousands of images of a diverse array of faces. Increasingly, those photos are coming from the internet, where they’re swept up by the millions without the knowledge of the people who posted them, categorized by age, gender, skin tone and dozens of other metrics, and shared with researchers at universities and companies.
privacy  1984  photos  sociology  Social  Media  Corporation 
5 days ago by oripsolob
They Left Me Out, and I Saw It All - The New York Times
FOMO versus actually knowing that you are missing out
sociology  Social  Media 
18 days ago by oripsolob
From Blackface To Blackfishing : NPR: Mickey Mouse
Mickey's early appearances were just layered with markers of blackface minstrelsy.

SAMMOND: His facial characteristics, the gloves he sometimes wears, the way that he acts, his bodily plasticity, his ability to take punishment all are kind of markers of the minstrel that are actually - had - were kind of established by the time he came on the scene in the late 1920s.

"Turkey in the Straw"

Nicholas said these cartoons were not just inspired by minstrelsy. They were quite literally minstrels in cartoons that had the same structure as minstrel shows with real people. And the audience that's watching those shorts in those days, they understood them as minstrel shows. By the time Mickey Mouse debuts, vaudeville is already on the wane. But blackface didn't die. It just left the stage and moved over to this new medium.

...

Nicholas told me that in the script for "Dumbo," the lead crow was actually called Jim Crow.

...
"Coal Black And De Sebben Dwarfs," by the way, that short is part of what's now called the Censored Eleven - a bunch of Warner Brothers cartoons that have since been taken out of syndication for being too racist. So Coal Black was happening alongside Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny and Felix the Cat. But Nicholas said this newer version of blackface with these much more markedly racist caricatures, it's, like, so obviously racist that people just stopped paying attention to how racist Mickey Mouse and Felix the Cat were.

...
After World War II, the nascent civil rights movement and the advent of television changed the terrain for blackface again. "Amos 'N' Andy," that long-running blackface radio show, tried to make the jump to TV in 1951 only with an entire cast of black actors in those lead roles. But the show's blackface reputation preceded it. And civil rights groups, including the NAACP, successfully petitioned CBS to cancel the show. So it was gone after three seasons. The weird twist to that is there wouldn't be another TV show with a majority black cast for another two decades. That's "Sanford And Son" in case you were wondering.
...
And this isn't just about blackface. This is about the white fantasy of black culture generally, right? So I mean, that's where I see this coming from. It's that there's this is deep, deep fetishistic desire for temporary blackness or the benefits of blackness that then triggers an equally deep shame on the other side of it because they - people know it's wrong at some level, you know? I mean, how else do you explain something that just has been roundly condemned for generations and just keeps happening.

DEMBY: Which brings us to this phenomenon that people are referring to as a new form of blackface - blackfishing, you know, like catfishing
race  history  humor  NPR  Music  sociology  Social  Media 
25 days ago by oripsolob
Photo series asks teens to edit photos until they're 'social media ready' - INSIDER
A photo series has shown the lengths some young people go to to edit their appearance before posting pictures on social media platforms like Instagram — and the results are pretty shocking.

The project, entitled Selfie Harm, saw renowned British photographer Rankin photograph 15 British teens aged 13-19.

The teens were then asked to spend five minutes editing the photo until they thought it looked "social media-ready."

The shots show not only how simple it is to change your appearance in a few minutes (thanks to the plethora of apps available nowadays), but also the pressure young people are under to look a certain way.
sociology  Social  Media  inequalities  gender  photos  editor 
5 weeks ago by oripsolob
‘What the Hell Is This?’ Officer in Viral Subway Video Didn’t Know He Had Gone Viral - The New York Times
The video was not the first time Officer Ali had gotten noticed online. He had achieved a small measure of attention after Customs and Border Protection detained him at Kennedy Airport in the early months of the Trump administration, even though he was a citizen, a New York police officer and a combat veteran who had spent two years in Kuwait.
Video  sociology  Social  Media  ferguson 
11 weeks ago by oripsolob
Delete or Ignore? Pretend You're a Facebook Content Moderator | Blog | Independent Lens | PBS
In 2018, after much debate and controversy, Facebook finally published its censorship policies. All 27 pages of them. The move, wrote the LA Times, “adds a new degree of transparency to a process that users, the public and advocates have criticized as arbitrary and opaque.” But as explored in the Independent Lens film The Cleaners, to what end do those policies translate into something sensible that a contractor hired to do the actual censoring can understand and apply?

And if you were one of those “cleaners,” what decisions would you make based on FB policy and your background?

This quiz is based on real scenarios as well as Facebook’s own censorship guidelines. Your task: Imagine that you yourself are a censor for hire, a “cleaner” whose job it is to monitor a social media feed. Get into the mindset of these real-life cleaners and try to guess what they actually decided.

Delete or ignore? Choose One.
Speech  Social  Media  constitution  Test 
november 2018 by oripsolob
Jonathan Haidt: Can a divided America heal? | TED Talk
We evolved for tribalism. One of the simplest and greatest insights into human social nature is the Bedouin proverb: "Me against my brother; me and my brother against our cousin; me and my brother and cousins against the stranger."

And that tribalism allowed us to create large societies and to come together in order to compete with others. That brought us out of the jungle and out of small groups, but it means that we have eternal conflict. The question you have to look at is: What aspects of our society are making that more bitter, and what are calming them down?

Diversity and immigration do a lot of good things. But what the globalists, I think, don't see, what they don't want to see, is that ethnic diversity cuts social capital and trust.

There's a very important study by Robert Putnam, the author of "Bowling Alone," looking at social capital databases. And basically, the more people feel that they are the same, the more they trust each other, the more they can have a redistributionist welfare state.

There's wonderful work by a political scientist named Karen Stenner, who shows that when people have a sense that we are all united, we're all the same, there are many people who have a predisposition to authoritarianism. Those people aren't particularly racist when they feel as through there's not a threat to our social and moral order. But if you prime them experimentally by thinking we're coming apart, people are getting more different, then they get more racist, homophobic, they want to kick out the deviants. So it's in part that you get an authoritarian reaction. The left, following through the Lennonist line -- the John Lennon line -- does things that create an authoritarian reaction.

JH: You have to see six to ten different threads all coming together. I'll just list a couple of them. So in America, one of the big -- actually, America and Europe -- one of the biggest ones is World War II. There's interesting research from Joe Henrich and others that says if your country was at war, especially when you were young, then we test you 30 years later in a commons dilemma or a prisoner's dilemma, you're more cooperative. Because of our tribal nature, if you're -- my parents were teenagers during World War II, and they would go out looking for scraps of aluminum to help the war effort. I mean, everybody pulled together. And so then these people go on, they rise up through business and government, they take leadership positions. They're really good at compromise and cooperation. They all retire by the '90s. So we're left with baby boomers by the end of the '90s. And their youth was spent fighting each other within each country, in 1968 and afterwards. The loss of the World War II generation, "The Greatest Generation," is huge. So that's one.
Video  politics  culture  Psychology  sociology  Social  Media  WWII  history 
october 2018 by oripsolob
Exploring the Bounds of Fair Use: Graham v. Prince
Caution: "Since 2013 the Copyright Alliance has partnered with New York based Cravath, Swaine and Moore LLP to assist in finding potential clients for an externship program at Columbia Law School to provide pro bono legal representation to individuals and small businesses in lawsuits involving cutting edge copyright issues. This case was one of the cases selected through that program."

Does not say whether the case AGAINST Prince was successful; importantly, that Prince's motion to DISMISS was not successful. Hmmmm...
COPYRIGHT  art  Social  Media 
september 2018 by oripsolob
The internet isn’t why Trump won, Stanford and Brown study finds.
Trump performed worse than previous Republican candidates among internet users and people who got campaign news online, the authors find in a paper published July 18 in the journal PLOS One. And he outperformed his predecessors among the demographic groups least likely to be online. In other words, Mitt Romney and John McCain got more support from internet users than Trump did.

The paper, from Stanford economists Levi Boxell and Matthew Gentzkow and Brown economist Jesse Shapiro, adds to a growing body of research indicating that the internet’s effects on U.S. political opinion may be overstated. The same authors found in 2017 that the country’s polarization has been most intense among the oldest Americans, who also spend the least time online. Cable news has been a more significant driver of partisan divisions, research suggests. In November 2016, just weeks after Trump’s election, media studies professors Keith Hampton and Eszter Hargittai made a persuasive case in the Hill that Trump’s win wasn’t Facebook’s fault. Hampton and Hargittai pointed out that research shows Facebook users are more likely to be connected to different kinds of people, while disconnection from the internet is broadly associated with social isolation and intolerance. Trump voters were also far less likely to use Twitter or Reddit than Clinton voters, they noted.

***Still, the authors were careful to acknowledge that more research is needed. The conclusion that “the internet was not a source of advantage to Trump,” they explain, relies on a series of three assumptions, each of which could be called into question.

If any media platform is to blame, it is not the web. It is more likely television, which is a more important source of political information. Growing polarization may also result from structural economic changes, like rising inequality, that have occurred in recent decades.
Social  Media  politics  literacy  election  mythology  tv 
july 2018 by oripsolob
Robin Dunbar: Is There A Limit To How Many Friends We Can Have? : NPR
Anthropologist Robin Dunbar believes the evolutionary structure of social networks limits us to 150 meaningful relationships at a time — even with the rise of social media
sociology  Video  Psychology  Social  Media 
july 2018 by oripsolob
The Risks of Social Media Use by Employees, and How Public Employers Can Create Strong Social Media Policies: Foster Swift
FREEDOM OF SPEECH IN PUBLIC SECTOR EMPLOYMENT

Over the years, courts have made a clear distinction between the rights entitled to a private citizen, and a public sector employee. Social media has blurred the lines between professional and personal life. The First Amendment guarantees free speech rights, but it is not without limits. This is true both online and offline.

In order to challenge an employment-related decision under the First Amendment, a public sector employee must (1) show their speech addresses a matter of public concern, and (2) show free-speech interests outweigh the employer’s efficiency interests.

If an employee can show that comments made through social media involve a matter of public concern, courts will evaluate whether the speech:

Impairs discipline or harmony among co-workers.
Has a detrimental impact on close working relationships for which personal loyalty and confidence are necessary.
Interferes with the normal operation of the employer’s business.
free  Speech  Social  Media  constitution 
july 2018 by oripsolob
Public Employees, Private Speech: 1st Amendment doesn't always protect government workers
Nonetheless, public employees often lose free speech cases because courts defer to an employer’s judgment that the employee’s inflammatory posts will cause disharmony or make the public view the public employer with derision or disrespect.

COMMUNITY CONCERNS
When a public employee’s posts create a real fear of backlash from the community, courts often defer to the employer’s judgments. “For example, I think such concerns are especially strong where a police officer’s off-duty speech—on social media or elsewhere—undermines a police department’s ability credibly to communicate its commitment to evenhanded law enforcement regardless of race,” Norton explains. “For example, consider the message sent to the public if a police chief were to march in a Klan parade while off duty—or sends a series of racist tweets.”
free  Speech  constitution  Social  Media 
july 2018 by oripsolob
To Tweet or not to Tweet: Government Employees and Social Media | Freedom Forum Institute
1) First of all, government employees are only protected by the First Amendment when they are speaking as private citizens. If their speech is part of their official job duties, then they can be fired or disciplined for it.

This rule comes from a 2006 Supreme Court case, Garcetti v. Ceballos. Obviously, it isn’t always easy to differentiate when a government employee is speaking as a private citizen, and when they are speaking as a government employee.

The Supreme Court established this as a necessary element for a government employee’s speech to be protected by the First Amendment in Pickering v. Board of Education. In a later case, Connick v. Myers, the Supreme Court instructed that the question of whether an employee’s speech addresses a matter of public concern should be determined by looking at the content, form, and context of a given statement, as revealed by the whole record, and not by applying a common, standardized rule. The Court also said that this was a question of law, meaning that it should be left to the court to decide, not a jury.

3) If a government employee was speaking as a private citizen on a matter of public concern, the next question is whether the government employer’s interest in efficiently fulfilling its public services is greater than the employee’s interest in speaking freely.

4) Special Note: Federal government employees have extra restrictions on their speech, which are imposed by the Hatch Act.

The Hatch Act, or the Act to Prevent Pernicious Political Activities, was passed in 1939. The purpose of the Hatch Act was to prevent federal employees from engaging in partisan political activities, such as endorsing particular political candidates.
Speech  constitution  Social  Media 
july 2018 by oripsolob
Government Employees Get to Have Opinions, Too | American Civil Liberties Union
What do federal employees remain free to say? The Supreme Court has stated clearly that public employees cannot be fired for speaking on issues of public concern as private individuals. Practically speaking, this means that – with the possible exception of certain high-ranking government officials – an employee can speak on personal time and in a personal capacity about matters that affect the public. Their protections are strongest when they are speaking about issues that do not relate to their job duties. For example, a scientist who works at the Environmental Protection Agency is free to research and write academic papers on her own time, which she can then publish under her own name. A State Department employee can attend a local school board meeting and express support for a measure being proposed. To the extent their speech meets the above requirements, employees can even speak anonymously. (One Twitter account that launched last night seems to be run by a handful of National Park Service rangers apparently writing during their personal time.)

DEMAND TRANSPARENCY FROM TRUMP

DEMAND TRANSPARENCY These are general rules, and there are exceptions, such as when an employee’s speech causes disruption to the workplace. But properly construed, any exceptions should apply only in those cases where the government’s interest in carrying out its duties is truly impaired by what an employee has said.  
Social  Media  constitution  Speech 
july 2018 by oripsolob
Public Employee’s Offensive Social Media Comments Unprotected
Although the court resolved the balancing test in favor of the employer in this case, it emphasized that government employees do not necessarily lose their right to free speech by working for the government and expressly cautioned that an employer's interest in maintaining efficiency will not always outweigh the interests of an employee in speaking on matters of public concern.

Grutzmacher v. Howard County, Md., 4th Cir., No. 15-2066 (March 20, 2017).

Professional Pointer: While the employer won this case, employers nevertheless should be careful when drafting and enforcing social media policies so that they do not interfere unnecessarily with employees' First Amendment rights.  
Social  Media  Speech  constitution 
july 2018 by oripsolob
Derek Powazek - I’m Not The Product, But I Play One On The Internet
Assumption: You’re either the product or the customer.
I’ve worked for, and even run, many companies in the last 20 years with various business models. Some provided something free in an attempt to build an audience large enough to sell advertising, some charged customers directly, and some did a combination of both. All treated their users with varying levels of respect. There was no correlation between how much money users paid and how well they were treated.

Assumption: Companies you pay treat you better.
I should be able to answer this with one word: AT&T. Or: Comcast. Or: Wells Fargo. Or: the government.

We all routinely pay companies that treat us like shit. In fact, I’d argue that, in general, online companies that I do not pay have far better customer policies and support than the companies I do pay.
Social  Media  Corporation  Money  advertising  literacy 
april 2018 by oripsolob
Are you really Facebook’s product? The history of a dangerous idea.
But even that isn’t where the story begins, because “you are the product” had been deployed to criticize media decades long before “social” entered the equation. Whether or not blue_beetle knew it, a version of the quote predates not just Facebook and Digg but the entire modern consumer internet. The invaluable online resource Quote Investigator traces it all the way back to 1973, and an unlikely source: a short film by the artists Carlota Fay Schoolman and Richard Serra called “Television Delivers People.”
...
This was not a novel idea even then: You can hear in “Television Delivers People” echoes of Gil Scott-Heron’s 1970 protest anthem, “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised.” These works aimed to expose broadcast television as a corporate-sponsored force for homogeneity and conformity, an obstacle to social or political change.

In this respect, Facebook is nearly TV’s opposite. The social network stands accused of unduly amplifying, not crushing, divisive views—of polarizing rather than homogenizing us.

There are at least two alternative ways of viewing our relationship to Facebook that hold more promise for making that relationship a healthier and less exploitive one. The first is to view ourselves as customers of Facebook, paying with our time, attention, and data instead of with money. This implies greater responsibility on both sides. If we understood that Facebook and other “free” online services exact real costs to things we value, we might use them more sparingly and judiciously.

The second is to view ourselves as part of Facebook’s labor force. Just as bees labor unwittingly on beekeepers’ behalf, our posts and status updates continually enrich Facebook. But we’re humans, not bees, and as such we have the capacity to collectively demand better treatment.

How about this, then, as an (admittedly ungainly) alternative to that overused maxim: “If you aren’t paying for it with money, you’re paying for it in other ways.”
advertising  Media  Social  Corporation  Video  art  tv  politics 
april 2018 by oripsolob
Having Your Smartphone Nearby Takes a Toll on Your Thinking (Even When It’s Silent and Facedown)
[I]ndividuals who completed these tasks while their phones were in another room performed the best, followed by those who left their phones in their pockets. In last place were those whose phones were on their desks. We saw similar results when participants’ phones were turned off: people performed worst when their phones were nearby, and best when they were away in a separate room. Thus, merely having their smartphones out on the desk led to a small but statistically significant impairment of individuals’ cognitive capacity — on par with effects of lacking sleep.

Beyond these cognitive and health-related consequences, smartphones may impair our social functioning: having your smartphone out can distract you during social experiences and make them less enjoyable.
shallows  Technology  phone  Social  Psychology  sociology 
march 2018 by oripsolob
Why Facebook Is the Junk Food of Socializing
Similarly, when we interact with “friends” on social-networking sites or through texting, it can feel like we’re getting quality social contact, but we are not. It turns out that face-to-face interaction with other people—real people, right in front of us, not characters on TV or friends we communicate via text messages—is absolutely vital for longevity and happiness. In fact, it is a larger contributor than exercise or diet!
Social  Media  sociology 
november 2017 by oripsolob
How Facebook Figures Out Everyone You've Ever Met
Shadow contact information has been a known feature of Facebook for a few years now. But most users remain unaware of its reach and power. Because shadow-profile connections happen inside Facebook’s algorithmic black box, people can’t see how deep the data-mining of their lives truly is, until an uncanny recommendation pops up.

Facebook isn’t scanning the work email of the attorney above. But it likely has her work email address on file, even if she never gave it to Facebook herself. If anyone who has the lawyer’s address in their contacts has chosen to share it with Facebook, the company can link her to anyone else who has it, such as the defense counsel in one of her cases.

It’s what the sociologist danah boyd calls “networked privacy”: All the people who know you and who choose to share their contacts with Facebook are making it easier for Facebook to make connections you may not want it to make—say if you’re in a profession like law, medicine, social work, or even journalism, where you might not want to be connected to people you encounter at work, because of what it could reveal about them or you, or because you may not have had a friendly encounter with them.
privacy  Social  Media 
november 2017 by oripsolob
First Evidence That Online Dating Is Changing the Nature of Society - MIT Technology Review
“Our model predicts nearly complete racial integration upon the emergence of online dating, even if the number of partners that individuals meet from newly formed ties is small,” say Ortega and Hergovich.

And there is another surprising effect. The team measure the strength of marriages by measuring the average distance between partners before and after the introduction of online dating. “Our model also predicts that marriages created in a society with online dating tend to be stronger,”
culture  marriage  sociology  Social  Media  race 
october 2017 by oripsolob
This Is How Your Fear and Outrage Are Being Sold for Profit
PRINT FOR STUDENTS

The News Feed Editor is a robot editor, and it is far better at capturing attention than normal human editors. It can predict what you’ll click on better than anyone you know. It’s what professor Pablo Boczkowski of Northwestern has called “the greatest editor in the history of humanity.”

A simplified version of the Facebook News Feed Editor’s Algorithm. Source: TC
It shows you stories, tracks your responses, and filters out the ones that you are least likely to respond to. It follows the videos you watch, the photos you hover over, and every link you click on. It is mapping your brain, seeking patterns of engagement.
It uses this map to create a private personal pipeline of media just for you. In doing this it has essentially become the editor-in-chief of a personalized newspaper that 2 billion people read every month.
By traditional journalistic standards, however, the News Feed Editor is a very, very bad editor. It doesn’t differentiate between factual information and things that merely look like facts (as we saw with the massive explosion of viral hoaxes during the 2016 election). It doesn’t identify content that is profoundly biased, or stories that are designed to propagate fear, mistrust, or outrage.
Media  literacy  Social  election  9/11  sociology  Money 
july 2017 by oripsolob
HODC seeks city aid for Brummel building | Evanston Now
This is a comment from the Wilmette HODC Low Income Housing closed Facebook group:

"In one of his meetings, Richard Koenig assured Wilmette residents that he would never come to Wilmette for handouts related to his Legion Hall project because he keeps reserves for his buildings. Wilmette residents were skeptical of his assurances because it has been HODC's habit to ask host communities for money for building repairs and improvements. Sure enough, just read this article about another of HODC's projects in Evanston."

Here was my comment in response: "I'm genuinely confused. How does this application for a federal loan constitute a "handout" from a "host community"?
housing  sociology  social  Media  literacy 
june 2017 by oripsolob
Does Facebook really care about you? - CNN.com
Facebook's real customers are the companies who actually pay them for this data, and for access to our eyeballs in the form of advertisements. The hours Facebook users put into their profiles and lists and updates is the labor that Facebook then sells to the market researchers and advertisers it serves. Deep down, most users sense this, which is why every time Facebook makes a change they are awakened from the net trance for long enough to be reminded of what is really going on. They see that their "news feeds" are going to be prioritized by an algorithm they will never understand. They begin to suspect that Facebook is about to become more useful to the companies who want to keep "important" stories from getting lost in the churn -- and less useful for the humans.
social  media  corporation  advertising  ais 
july 2014 by oripsolob
Twitter, Facebook, Instagram: It’s possible to use social media mindfully.
Sherry Turkle wrote about putting our lives “on pause" in order to tweet, text, or take a selfie: “When you get accustomed to a life of stops and starts, you get less accustomed to reflecting on where you are and what you are thinking.” A few months ago, also in the Times, Nick Bilton wrote that we're all so busy capturing moments, we're not living in them. This is a false choice. You can live in the moment and capture it.
shallows  iphone  photography  social  media  technology 
december 2013 by oripsolob
Haitian Photographer Wins Major U.S. Copyright Victory - NYTimes.com
His photographs were originally posted on TwitPic, a website that allows users to put pictures on Twitter, by Mr. Morel hours after the earthquake on Jan. 12, 2010. It was then reposted by a Twitter user named Lisandro Suero, who claimed they were his. Agence France-Presse took the photos from TwitPic and distributed them to clients. Getty Images distributed the photos in the United States.
copyright  photos  photography  social  media 
november 2013 by oripsolob
Simone Collins: The Value of Being Alone Together
Here is where being alone together comes in. While many aren't able to enjoy extended periods of intense socialization, they can engage in what I like to call parallel play- doing quiet, independent activities in the presence of others. As a very introverted child (and a still rather introverted adult), parallel play is one of my favorite pastimes. The ubiquity of the internet and preponderance of mobile devices and laptops available today have revolutionized parallel play. Now, there are more opportunities than ever for people to spend time together in a quiet, independent, but non-awkward manner.
technology  social  psychology  personality 
august 2013 by oripsolob
Common Core and Print
Before we bury our books, magazines and newspapers, as an advocate for print, I would like to press pause on education's electronic obsession. As teachers, we find that our students concentrate better, read with greater clarity, and analyze text more critically when reading with physical copies of books and newspapers.
books  social  education  media  shallows 
february 2013 by oripsolob
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read