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Affordable Housing Units Proposed In Deerbrook Development Plan | Patch
The developers hoping to build 246 residential units behind the Deerbrook Shopping Center offered to include 18 affordable apartments for at least 25 years.

That's 7% "affordable" housing, which according to the developer means available to persons earning less than 120% AMI.
housing  sociology 
yesterday by oripsolob
Americans' Perceptions of U.S. Crime Problem Are Steady
Google Doc in Prisons folder / can specify which cities to make it local
sociology  prisons  lessons 
9 days ago by oripsolob
How white racism destroys black wealth - The Washington Post
In the end, they were left with one number: $48,000.

That’s the amount the average home in a majority-black neighborhood is undervalued, relative to an identical home in an identical all-white neighborhood once you properly adjust for all the other structural and neighborhood characteristics that could plausibly affect that number. That’s the “cost of racial bias,” as the authors put it, “amounting to $156 billion in cumulative losses” accruing to black homeowners.
housing  race  inequalities  sociology 
15 days ago by oripsolob
Walking-to-Work Stories: Heartwarming or Harmful? | On the Media | WNYC Studios
We begin this week's transit-oriented theme show with a story of Good Samaritans and gratitude. Specifically, the beloved, "heartwarming" media trope of the person who walks miles and miles and miles to work — usually out of heartbreaking necessity — and is rewarded for their perseverance with a car, or a bike, or at least an appearance on the 5 o'clock news. Uplifting as these tales may sometimes be, they are also "terrible," as Streetsblog national reporter Angie Schmitt explained to Brooke.
story  race  class  car  sociology  inequalities  NPR  Podcast  radio  Media 
21 days ago by oripsolob
Starship Troopers: One of the Most Misunderstood Movies Ever - The Atlantic
But those critics had missed the point. Starship Troopers is satire, a ruthlessly funny and keenly self-aware sendup of right-wing militarism.
Movie  sociology  War  history 
7 weeks ago by oripsolob
Large Majorities Dislike Political Correctness - The Atlantic
With the exception of the small tribe of devoted conservatives, progressive activists are the most racially homogeneous group in the country.

One obvious question is what people mean by “political correctness.” In the extended interviews and focus groups, participants made clear that they were concerned about their day-to-day ability to express themselves: They worry that a lack of familiarity with a topic, or an unthinking word choice, could lead to serious social sanctions for them. But since the survey question did not define political correctness for respondents, we cannot be sure what, exactly, the 80 percent of Americans who regard it as a problem have in mind.
politics  race  sociology 
9 weeks ago by oripsolob
Jonathan Haidt: Can a divided America heal? | TED Talk
We evolved for tribalism. One of the simplest and greatest insights into human social nature is the Bedouin proverb: "Me against my brother; me and my brother against our cousin; me and my brother and cousins against the stranger."

And that tribalism allowed us to create large societies and to come together in order to compete with others. That brought us out of the jungle and out of small groups, but it means that we have eternal conflict. The question you have to look at is: What aspects of our society are making that more bitter, and what are calming them down?

Diversity and immigration do a lot of good things. But what the globalists, I think, don't see, what they don't want to see, is that ethnic diversity cuts social capital and trust.

There's a very important study by Robert Putnam, the author of "Bowling Alone," looking at social capital databases. And basically, the more people feel that they are the same, the more they trust each other, the more they can have a redistributionist welfare state.

There's wonderful work by a political scientist named Karen Stenner, who shows that when people have a sense that we are all united, we're all the same, there are many people who have a predisposition to authoritarianism. Those people aren't particularly racist when they feel as through there's not a threat to our social and moral order. But if you prime them experimentally by thinking we're coming apart, people are getting more different, then they get more racist, homophobic, they want to kick out the deviants. So it's in part that you get an authoritarian reaction. The left, following through the Lennonist line -- the John Lennon line -- does things that create an authoritarian reaction.

JH: You have to see six to ten different threads all coming together. I'll just list a couple of them. So in America, one of the big -- actually, America and Europe -- one of the biggest ones is World War II. There's interesting research from Joe Henrich and others that says if your country was at war, especially when you were young, then we test you 30 years later in a commons dilemma or a prisoner's dilemma, you're more cooperative. Because of our tribal nature, if you're -- my parents were teenagers during World War II, and they would go out looking for scraps of aluminum to help the war effort. I mean, everybody pulled together. And so then these people go on, they rise up through business and government, they take leadership positions. They're really good at compromise and cooperation. They all retire by the '90s. So we're left with baby boomers by the end of the '90s. And their youth was spent fighting each other within each country, in 1968 and afterwards. The loss of the World War II generation, "The Greatest Generation," is huge. So that's one.
Video  politics  culture  Psychology  sociology  Social  Media  WWII  history 
9 weeks ago by oripsolob
Jonathan Haidt: The moral roots of liberals and conservatives | TED Talk
1) Harm/Care (compassion for the weak, eg.)
2) Fairness/Reciprocity (unclear if this appears in animals)
3) Ingroup/Loyalty (tribal psych/found in animal groups, too)
4) Authority/Respect (voluntary deference)
5) Purity/Sanctity (attaining virtue via body control, the Left & food)

Across cultures, Liberals tend to value or function on 2 channels, Conservatives function on all 5 channels.
Video  education  politics  Psychology  culture  sociology 
9 weeks ago by oripsolob
Great American High School: Reforming the Nation’s Remaining Low-Performing High Schools | America's Promise Alliance
Over the last two decades, the number of low-performing high schools has been cut in half, as high school graduation rates have reached an all-time high. While graduation at the remaining low-performing high schools still is just a 50-50 proposition, these schools make up a small percentage of high schools throughout the country, totaling just 10 percent of all traditional high schools enrolling 300 or more students.

From this progress, a clear vision emerges on how high schools can be reformed to once again serve as engines of economic and community development. This is why the Great American High School report, authored by Civic Enterprises and the Everyone Graduates Center at the Johns Hopkins University, was released in partnership with America’s Promise Alliance and the Alliance for Excellent Education, as part of the GradNation campaign working to increase the national on-time graduation rate to 90 percent.
education  inequalities  sociology 
9 weeks ago by oripsolob
Exclusive: we re-ran polls from 1991 on Anita Hill, this time on Christine Blasey Ford - Vox
The answer might seem obvious, but some of Kavanaugh’s defenders have argued that he should be confirmed — even if guilty. The understandably pseudonymous Federalist contributor Soren Midgley has argued that “what we know about Kavanaugh’s record for the last 30 years of his life tells us the realized negative consequences would be minimal if he were actually guilty.” Washington Post columnist Megan McArdle has gone further, stating, “I would be cool with a teen murderer getting a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court.”

Americans at large took a different stand in October 1991, and take a mostly identical one today. In both cases, a minority of 31-33 percent say that the allegations, if true, shouldn’t disqualify Thomas/Kavanaugh from the court, while 67-69 percent argue they should.

It’s easy, especially in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein revelations and #MeToo, to assume that the American public takes allegations of sexual harassment and assault more seriously than it did decades ago. And some parts of our survey confirm that, especially the findings that American voters think less of Trump and of senators who support Kavanaugh.

But in the crucial matter of whether a true accusation of sexual assault is important enough to derail a nomination, things haven’t changed much since 1991.

In part because of the demographic makeup of the parties, there are significant gaps based on age, race, and church attendance as well. Eighty-four percent of black respondents and 75 percent of Hispanic respondents say a true allegation is enough to reject, compared to 66 percent of whites. 78 percent of people between 18 and 30 said a true allegation would be enough, compared to 63 percent of people 66 or older.
politics  gender  women  inequalities  history  sociology 
10 weeks ago by oripsolob
The rape culture of the 1980s, explained by Sixteen Candles - Vox
Here are the basic ideas embedded in this plot:

• Girls who drink are asking for it. Girls who have sex are asking for it. Girls who go to parties are asking for it. They are asking for it even if they only drink and have sex and party with their monogamous boyfriends. Whatever happens to that kind of girl as a result is funny.

• Boys are owed girls. A good guy will help his nerdy bro to get a girl. Her consent is not necessary or desired.

• To avoid being the kind of girl who gets raped, you need to earn male approval. If you earn male approval, other girls might be raped, but you won’t be, and that will prove that you are special.

• Once you earn male approval, it can be taken away — as Caroline’s goes away once Jake tires of her — and then you’ll go from being the kind of girl who doesn’t get raped to the kind of girl who does.

• A good guy can participate in this whole system and remain an unsullied dream guy.

• The kind of girl who gets raped has no right to complain about what happens to her. Also it isn’t rape.

That’s how mainstream culture presented rape, and thus affirmed rape culture, in 1984.
culture  sociology  movies  gender  inequalities 
10 weeks ago by oripsolob
Opportunity Insights
"Translating Research Into Policy Action to Increase Upward Mobility"
class  race  sociology  inequalities  Map 
10 weeks ago by oripsolob
The Opportunity Atlas
Could be connected to the Social Class Stations activity, adding the dimension of race.
Map  sociology  class  inequalities  race 
10 weeks ago by oripsolob
The American Dream Is Harder To Find In Some Neighborhoods | WBEZ
A new online data tool being made public Monday finds a strong correlation between where people are raised and their chances of achieving the American dream.

Harvard University economist Raj Chetty has been working with a team of researchers on this tool — the first of its kind because it marries U.S. Census Bureau data with data from the Internal Revenue Service. And the findings are changing how researchers think about economic mobility.

It used to be that people born in the 1940s or '50s were virtually guaranteed to achieve the American dream of earning more than your parents did, Chetty says. But that's not the case anymore.

"You see that for kids turning 30 today, who were born in the mid-1980s, only 50 percent of them go on to earn more than their parents did," Chetty says. "It's a coin flip as to whether you are now going to achieve the American dream."
mythology  sociology  class  inequalities 
10 weeks ago by oripsolob
Kavanaugh's 'Good Guy' Defense Reveals A Dangerous Rape Myth | HuffPost
Boasting about sex, real or imagined, is also a common way young men bond with each other. To a sociologist, it’s a prime example of something called dominance work.

Men learn from a young age that being manly means you need to be dominant. High school boys try to exert dominance over other men, often by calling each other “fags,” and dominance over women, by talking about them sexually and boasting of sexual conquests.

The young women who grow up with these teenage boys learn to normalize their experiences of sexual harassment and abuse because they are so common. Young women don’t want to make a “big deal” of their experiences of harassment and assault. Those who do are often criticized by their peer groups or policed by their friends for not successfully dealing with men’s aggressive behaviors.
sex  inequalities  sociology 
11 weeks ago by oripsolob
The State of Justice Reform 2017
Look at:

"Reformers Look to Jails as a Key to Ending Mass Incarceration"

Recently, attention to the problem of mass incarceration in the United States has broadened beyond a concentration on state and federal prisons to include local jails. Unlike prisons, which hold those who have been convicted of crimes, jails primarily hold individuals awaiting trial (called the “pretrial” population) or serving short sentences (typically less than one year).
prisons  sociology 
12 weeks ago by oripsolob
Are You Middle Class? This Calculator Claims to Tell You - The New York Times
“Our determination of whether or not you’re in the middle class is based on income alone,” said Rakesh Kochhar, a senior researcher at Pew.
class  sociology  Money 
september 2018 by oripsolob
Are you in the U.S. middle class? Try our income calculator | Pew Research Center
Decent in terms of norming for geographical region, but focuses too much on income as a factor
class  Money  sociology  education 
september 2018 by oripsolob
Race, Discipline, and Safety at U.S. Public Schools | American Civil Liberties Union
The new data shows that students of color make up the majority of public school students. When federal data was first collected in 1968, over 80 percent of public school students were white. Because of changing demographics, white students now constitute just 49 percent of American school children. As the federal government considers further cuts to education funding, it should recognize that the harm will now fall in greater measure on communities of color, which have historically been underserved by school systems.
prisons  education  sociology  race 
september 2018 by oripsolob
The hidden racism of school discipline, in 7 charts - Vox
Starting even before kindergarten, black students are more likely to be suspended or expelled. They're more likely to be referred to law enforcement or even arrested. And even when they're breaking the same rules, studies have found black students are punished more often and more harshly than their white peers.

7 charts / 3 students per chart?
race  inequalities  sociology  education  prisons  lesson 
september 2018 by oripsolob
New Trier High School Summary of Selected Facts;
Look at racial demographics then click "Discipline Report" on right hand side. Compare the racial makeup of school ("Enrollement") to the percentages of students given severe disciplinary consequences (eg., suspensions).

NTHS: Black = 0.6% of students, but 6.3% and 7.5% of (in- and out-of-school) suspensions, respectively. Do the math then read this: https://www.vox.com/2015/10/31/9646504/discipline-race-charts
education  sociology  race  inequalities  newtrier  lesson  prisons 
september 2018 by oripsolob
The Politics of the Professoriat: Political diversity on campus | CBC Radio
"We've created a hostile climate for people who don't fit in intellectually. We've marginalized them. We've made it clear they don't belong; they're not welcome. And then the really smart ones among them don't apply! And what we're left with is a politically homogeneous field of inquiry, which therefore has problems studying anything that is politically valenced."
– Jonathan Haidt

Why does a "political monoculture" hurt social science research?

ophobophobia = fear of being branded Islamophobic, homophobic, etc. For example, to address poverty/inequality, three factors are critical in why certain groups or individuals do better than others:

1) Whether parents are married (even if you're poor)
2) Subculture that emphasizes importance of education and/or delayed gratification
3) IQ

But though these are the most important determinants, we have not made progress in research, because of ophobophobia: "no one dares address these major factors"; instead, more focus on structural racism, etc. And this issue of poverty/inequality must be solved. But ophobophobia rules out 90% of the causal factors.

"Students and professors know, he adds, that 'if you step out of line at all, you will be called a racist, sexist or homophobe. In fact it’s gotten so bad out there that there’s a new term—‘ophobophobia,’ which is the fear of being called x-ophobic."

"Human beings are tribal creatures. We evolved for small religions....We're really good at making something sacred and trusting each other....You can see this easily with fundamentalist Xians. Some of the them will deny evolution -- seems silly from the outside. You can see the same thing on college campuses. The causes of college campuses are laudable, but we should pursue them practically, pragmatically, and rationally. But "when we make them into a religion, that's when we activate all of our 'religious software', which is a set of mental concepts that include blasphemy, heresy, burning at the stake, witch hunts. The basic language is one of sin, and blasphemy, and punishment. No one speaks up for anyone because then they'll be called a witch.

But there is NO ROLE for religion in the classroom in intellectual matters. There we need communities in which NOTHING is sacred. Now there so much that is sacred on campus, can't be said."

The Religion of Social Justice. Justice is a good thing, but when Social Justice becomes a religion...

IGen believes in the concept that "words are violence".
politics  Podcast  sociology  education  race  inequalities  religion  Speech 
september 2018 by oripsolob
Five Questions with the team behind THE AREA – Gene Siskel Film Center – Medium
"Thinking about The Area as an example, during testimony in City Hall, an activist noted that the development proposals for “the area” (the targeted property, bounded on the north and south by Garfield Boulevard and on the east and west by Steward Avenue and Wallace Street) identified it as blighted, but the proposals didn’t acknowledge how and *why* it came to be that way. The official documents didn’t explain what the train company and city set into motion years before."

"It clarifies how international economic dynamics combined with structural disadvantage and racism produce the problems that plague the city."

"And the longer we worked on the project, the more my reactions weren’t just that shock of change, but also the erasure of memories."

"I hope each person who sees The Area can reflect in their own way on the communities that made and shaped their own lives, and that they can consider the ways American society did or didn’t allow those communities to thrive, or even to exist."
sociology  Corporation  chicago  Video  inequalities  race  Movie 
august 2018 by oripsolob
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