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Emmett Till’s Murder, and How America Remembers Its Darkest Moments - The New York Times
He walked into a store and it changed civil rights. That crumbling store has come to symbolize the struggle to address the nation’s racial violence.

MONEY, Miss. — Along the edge of Money Road, across from the railroad tracks, an old grocery store rots.

In August 1955, a 14-year-old black boy visiting from Chicago walked in to buy candy. After being accused of whistling at the white woman behind the counter, he was later kidnapped, tortured, lynched and dumped in the Tallahatchie River.

The murder of Emmett Till is remembered as one of the most hideous hate crimes of the 20th century, a brutal episode in American history that helped kindle the civil rights movement. And the place where it all began, Bryant’s Grocery & Meat Market, is still standing. Barely.
race  history  inequalities  Video 
8 weeks ago by oripsolob
How We Analyzed Video Gambling in Illinois | ProPublica Illinois
More often than not, video gambling machines are found in lower-income communities, our analysis of demographic data found. Devices can be found in Berwyn but not Oak Park, Waukegan but not Lake Forest, Harvey but not Palos Park. In fact, as the average income level of a community decreases, the average number of machines increases. The city of Chicago does not allow gambling machines within the city limits and has therefore been excluded from this analysis.

We found a significant negative correlation between the number of video gambling machines and the average household income of a city and a county.
Games  Video  sociology  class  inequalities 
8 weeks ago by oripsolob
90-Second Newbery - Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli 1991 Newbery Medal...
Adapted by Siena L, Yaretzy M, and Tatevik A. of Edgewood Middle School (2018)
Books  Video  Music 
10 weeks ago by oripsolob
Dodge Super Bowl Ad Using MLK Speech Draws Criticism | Time
Featuring Martin Luther King's speech, "The Drum Major Instinct"
Video  history  Corporation  car 
12 weeks ago by oripsolob
Why we still need John Berger’s Ways of Seeing | Dazed
But it’s Berger’s discussion of how we look at women which resonates most strongly in our current image-obsessed society. Today, the idea of the male gaze may seem well established, and Berger and his all-male team didn’t claim to invent the concept which would later be christened by film critic Laura Mulvey.
gender  women  sociology  inequalities  Video  tv  advertising 
january 2019 by oripsolob
‘What the Hell Is This?’ Officer in Viral Subway Video Didn’t Know He Had Gone Viral - The New York Times
The video was not the first time Officer Ali had gotten noticed online. He had achieved a small measure of attention after Customs and Border Protection detained him at Kennedy Airport in the early months of the Trump administration, even though he was a citizen, a New York police officer and a combat veteran who had spent two years in Kuwait.
Video  sociology  Social  Media  ferguson 
december 2018 by oripsolob
Drunk History: "Charleston" :: Comedy :: Reviews :: Drunk History :: Paste
He’s recounting the truly inspirational story of Robert Smalls (Brandon T. Jackson), a former slave who leads a takeover of a Confederate ship and later enlists thousands of black soldiers for the Union army. (
history  Video  War  race 
november 2018 by oripsolob
African Burial Ground Digital Diaries - New York National Parks
PBS film 55 minutes long

From the 1690s until the 1790s, both free and enslaved Africans were buried in a 6.6 acre burial ground in Lower Manhattan, outside the boundaries of the settlement of New Amsterdam, later known as New York. Lost to history due to landfill and development, the grounds were rediscovered in 1991 as a consequence of the planned construction of a Federal office building. A memorial at the African Burial Ground National Monument honors the memories of the estimated 15,000 enslaved and free Africans who were interred in the burial ground.
history  race  mythology  Video 
october 2018 by oripsolob
Jonathan Haidt: Can a divided America heal? | TED Talk
We evolved for tribalism. One of the simplest and greatest insights into human social nature is the Bedouin proverb: "Me against my brother; me and my brother against our cousin; me and my brother and cousins against the stranger."

And that tribalism allowed us to create large societies and to come together in order to compete with others. That brought us out of the jungle and out of small groups, but it means that we have eternal conflict. The question you have to look at is: What aspects of our society are making that more bitter, and what are calming them down?

Diversity and immigration do a lot of good things. But what the globalists, I think, don't see, what they don't want to see, is that ethnic diversity cuts social capital and trust.

There's a very important study by Robert Putnam, the author of "Bowling Alone," looking at social capital databases. And basically, the more people feel that they are the same, the more they trust each other, the more they can have a redistributionist welfare state.

There's wonderful work by a political scientist named Karen Stenner, who shows that when people have a sense that we are all united, we're all the same, there are many people who have a predisposition to authoritarianism. Those people aren't particularly racist when they feel as through there's not a threat to our social and moral order. But if you prime them experimentally by thinking we're coming apart, people are getting more different, then they get more racist, homophobic, they want to kick out the deviants. So it's in part that you get an authoritarian reaction. The left, following through the Lennonist line -- the John Lennon line -- does things that create an authoritarian reaction.

JH: You have to see six to ten different threads all coming together. I'll just list a couple of them. So in America, one of the big -- actually, America and Europe -- one of the biggest ones is World War II. There's interesting research from Joe Henrich and others that says if your country was at war, especially when you were young, then we test you 30 years later in a commons dilemma or a prisoner's dilemma, you're more cooperative. Because of our tribal nature, if you're -- my parents were teenagers during World War II, and they would go out looking for scraps of aluminum to help the war effort. I mean, everybody pulled together. And so then these people go on, they rise up through business and government, they take leadership positions. They're really good at compromise and cooperation. They all retire by the '90s. So we're left with baby boomers by the end of the '90s. And their youth was spent fighting each other within each country, in 1968 and afterwards. The loss of the World War II generation, "The Greatest Generation," is huge. So that's one.
Video  politics  culture  Psychology  sociology  Social  Media  WWII  history 
october 2018 by oripsolob
Jonathan Haidt: The moral roots of liberals and conservatives | TED Talk
1) Harm/Care (compassion for the weak, eg.)
2) Fairness/Reciprocity (unclear if this appears in animals)
3) Ingroup/Loyalty (tribal psych/found in animal groups, too)
4) Authority/Respect (voluntary deference)
5) Purity/Sanctity (attaining virtue via body control, the Left & food)

Across cultures, Liberals tend to value or function on 2 channels, Conservatives function on all 5 channels.
Video  education  politics  Psychology  culture  sociology 
october 2018 by oripsolob
Five Questions with the team behind THE AREA – Gene Siskel Film Center – Medium
"Thinking about The Area as an example, during testimony in City Hall, an activist noted that the development proposals for “the area” (the targeted property, bounded on the north and south by Garfield Boulevard and on the east and west by Steward Avenue and Wallace Street) identified it as blighted, but the proposals didn’t acknowledge how and *why* it came to be that way. The official documents didn’t explain what the train company and city set into motion years before."

"It clarifies how international economic dynamics combined with structural disadvantage and racism produce the problems that plague the city."

"And the longer we worked on the project, the more my reactions weren’t just that shock of change, but also the erasure of memories."

"I hope each person who sees The Area can reflect in their own way on the communities that made and shaped their own lives, and that they can consider the ways American society did or didn’t allow those communities to thrive, or even to exist."
sociology  Corporation  chicago  Video  inequalities  race  Movie 
august 2018 by oripsolob
Robin Dunbar: Is There A Limit To How Many Friends We Can Have? : NPR
Anthropologist Robin Dunbar believes the evolutionary structure of social networks limits us to 150 meaningful relationships at a time — even with the rise of social media
sociology  Video  Psychology  Social  Media 
july 2018 by oripsolob
Are you really Facebook’s product? The history of a dangerous idea.
But even that isn’t where the story begins, because “you are the product” had been deployed to criticize media decades long before “social” entered the equation. Whether or not blue_beetle knew it, a version of the quote predates not just Facebook and Digg but the entire modern consumer internet. The invaluable online resource Quote Investigator traces it all the way back to 1973, and an unlikely source: a short film by the artists Carlota Fay Schoolman and Richard Serra called “Television Delivers People.”
...
This was not a novel idea even then: You can hear in “Television Delivers People” echoes of Gil Scott-Heron’s 1970 protest anthem, “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised.” These works aimed to expose broadcast television as a corporate-sponsored force for homogeneity and conformity, an obstacle to social or political change.

In this respect, Facebook is nearly TV’s opposite. The social network stands accused of unduly amplifying, not crushing, divisive views—of polarizing rather than homogenizing us.

There are at least two alternative ways of viewing our relationship to Facebook that hold more promise for making that relationship a healthier and less exploitive one. The first is to view ourselves as customers of Facebook, paying with our time, attention, and data instead of with money. This implies greater responsibility on both sides. If we understood that Facebook and other “free” online services exact real costs to things we value, we might use them more sparingly and judiciously.

The second is to view ourselves as part of Facebook’s labor force. Just as bees labor unwittingly on beekeepers’ behalf, our posts and status updates continually enrich Facebook. But we’re humans, not bees, and as such we have the capacity to collectively demand better treatment.

How about this, then, as an (admittedly ungainly) alternative to that overused maxim: “If you aren’t paying for it with money, you’re paying for it in other ways.”
advertising  Media  Social  Corporation  Video  art  tv  politics 
april 2018 by oripsolob
Project Essential Question: "Why does the US have troops in _____?" - Away from my Desk
A podcast is an obvious product, since I was inspired by listening to a podcast. The issue with a podcast is that it's hard to follow chronology, particularly if you're explaining shifting allegiances over time (the Intercepted episode works in part because it's focusing on the US's role (and, even more specifically, its misdeeds) in Iraq. If it was also explaining the interplay of relationships between the Iraqi government, the Kurds, Sunnis, Shias, Iran, the Yazidis, etc., it would be utterly baffling.

A Ted-Talk style lecture with graphics might work well, as would some kind of beautiful infographic. A Youtube video (again with graphics) might also work.

A play along the lines of The Great Game could be really effective (a promenade piece would be especially cool) but in order for this to work, the team would need to choose a country, or maybe 2-4 countries as shorter pieces taht weave together, and making these choices tends to be a nightmare.
pbl  history  Podcast  Video 
march 2018 by oripsolob
How To Stop School Shootings - YouTube
Posted on the New Trier Free Discussion FB group. Quote: "Common sense. Well said. Best thing I've heard on the topic."
constitution  Video 
february 2018 by oripsolob
Two questions that can change your life - YouTube
What's my sentence?
How am I better today than I was yesterday?
Video 
january 2018 by oripsolob
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