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Doctor Who Magazine - 39 Years of Happy Times and Places! – Broken Frontier
It was precisely 39 years ago that the first issue of Marvel UK’s Doctor Who Weekly went on sale, cover dated 17th October (the date it was due to go off sale!) and began a new era in Doctor Who comics which is still continuing today, 530 issues later…although these days, of course, it’s called Doctor Who Magazine, and is published by Panini since Marvel UK has long since gone the way of the Dodo, the Tyrannosaurus Rex, and British Home Stores. Today’s DWM is a very different beast, a full-fledged magazine of which the comic strip is just a small (though vital) part. But in 1979 the new weekly was very much a comic, and benefited from the input of some of the most talented names in British comics.
comics  link 
2 days ago by paulgreer
The Serena cartoon debate: calling out racism is not ‘censorship’ | Gary Younge
If there is one thing more damning than the racist cartoon of Serena Williams published in Melbourne’s Herald Sun earlier this week, it’s the paper’s response to accusations of racism. And that’s saying something. Because the cartoon is bad. It’s Hattie McDaniel in Gone With the Wind, Mammy Two Shoes from Tom and Jerry, going out in the cotton fields with Topsy to eat watermelon, Aunt Jemima’s pancakes bad. It’s Donald Trump, Boris Johnson, Pauline Hanson, Jeremy Clarkson after a bottle of scotch and a screening of Katie Hopkins’ documentary on white South African farmers bad.
link  tmblrlnk  comics 
4 weeks ago by paulgreer
Spinning – Tillie Walden’s Eisner Award-Winning Graphic Memoir is a Masterpiece of Comics Narrative
From The End of Summer to I Love this Part through to A City Inside, a rich seam of autobiography runs through Tillie Walden’s comics, manifesting itself in everything from imaginative visual metaphor to the use of on-page avatars to embody her own experiences. In her Eisner Award-winning Spinning Walden takes a more direct approach to her autobio practice, detailing her childhood years as a competitive skater in a memoir that explores themes of identity, family, coming out and those first formative steps to adulthood with a subtle but deeply affecting poignancy.
link  comics 
5 weeks ago by paulgreer
Puerto Rico Will Receive Funds Thanks to La Boriqueña Comic
While the U.S. government has done an absolutely paltry job of helping Puerto Rico recover from a devastating season of hurricanes that left thousands of people dead and millions without proper access to power, one comics creator is doing what he can to give back to the island.
link  comics 
6 weeks ago by paulgreer
Remembering the Woman Who Changed Marvel Comics - The Atlantic
After Marie Severin started at Marvel Comics in 1959, one of her first assignments was a spread that Esquire magazine commissioned on college drug culture. “They wanted Kirby,” she recalled in an interview, referring to the company’s biggest star, the penciler Jack Kirby. “[The production manager Sol Brodsky] said, ‘I don’t want to use Kirby, we’ll miss a deadline. Marie, see what they want
link  comics 
6 weeks ago by paulgreer
'Disgrace and shame': Alan Moore points to Boris Johnson in Grenfell fire comic | Books | The Guardian
Moore has briefly come out of retirement to contribute to a new anthology raising money for PTSD support for survivors
comics  link 
8 weeks ago by paulgreer
Yes, graphic novels are thriving. (Well done, Booker) | Rachel Cooke | Opinion | The Guardian
omic book Sabrina by Nick Drnaso is on the longlist for the prize, but it’s just the latest in a fine tradition
link  twt  comics 
11 weeks ago by paulgreer
#Comicsgate: How an Anti-Diversity Harassment Campaign in Comics Got Ugly—and Profitable
In July of 2017, five days after the death of groundbreaking comics publisher Flo Steinberg, a group of Marvel Comics’ female staff went out for milkshakes to celebrate her legacy. One of them, Heather Antos—at the time an assistant editor at the company working on The Unbelievable Gwenpool—snapped a selfie of the group holding their sweets and posted it on Twitter.
comics  comic  link  Comicsgate 
july 2018 by paulgreer
A Comic About My Bad Ass Grandmother aka Nag Finger
A Comic About My Bad Ass Grandmother aka Nag Finger is about my favorite matriarch in life, my grandma. It’s about a long Chinese tradition of loving boys over girls just because they’re boys. It’s about the horrific custom of foot binding that debilitated women all over China and kept them close to home. It’s about how one bad ass grandmother raised three boys on her own, ran a laundry mat in Washington Heights, and learned to speak absolutely no English. It’s about a woman who scares the sh*t out of me, and the world, but who inspires me every day to be just as bad ass.
comics  link 
june 2018 by paulgreer
The True Death Of Billy The Kid
Rick Geary has been doing pretty much the same thing for over thirty years. This is not a criticism.
link  comics 
june 2018 by paulgreer
Storytellers: 3 Artists Weigh In How Their Artwork Tells A Story - Society6 Blog
Stories make the world go round. They capture our minds, pull at our hearts and inspire change, growth and development.
comics 
may 2018 by paulgreer
Love & Rockets #5
Having been away from comics for well over a year doesn’t just mean abstaining from crap. I hadn’t seen an issue of the new volume of Love & Rockets, and truth be told am still behind on the last volume of New Stories. That needs to be said up front because it’s important to recognize that any issue of Love & Rockets taken in isolation is incomplete. I’ve read almost everything Los Bros have ever done but the saga at this point is so massive, and takes a significant time investment to get back up to speed, that I usually save up a few stories at a time. On their own and by design individual chapters rarely add up to much.
comics 
may 2018 by paulgreer
Myriad Editions to Publish Olivier Kugler’s Graphic Journalism Depicting the Plight of Syrian Refugees in ‘Escaping Wars and Waves’ in July
Olivier Kugler’s series of brilliant drawings of refugees from Syria establishes this award-winning artist as one of the most important graphic reporters of our day.
comics  bffr 
may 2018 by paulgreer
Caligula – Ada Price Re-Imagines History and an Emperor’s Descent into Madness in an Exceptional Piece of Visual Storytelling
One of the most interesting things about the comics medium is that how a story is told is perhaps more important than the story being told. In Ada Price’s Caligula, she extrapolates the little known legend of said Roman emperor’s horse being made a member of the senate to such a degree as to become fantasy, creating a work that while non-functional as a history lesson is deeply evocative as a piece of historical fiction. Price’s control over the language and the craft of visual storytelling is exceptional here, wringing out from a fragmentary story a host of emotions, from pathos to disgust.
comics 
may 2018 by paulgreer
Inside the biggest comic book collection in the world
A few weeks ago, on Free Comic Book Day, Bob Bretall came back from his local indie comic shop with about 480 new comics. It was a monster haul, sure, but you have to see it from his perspective. When you own the world's largest personal comic book collection, with well over 100,000 individual issues, no purchase, short of maybe buying an entire comic book shop, is going to seem particularly monumental.
comics 
may 2018 by paulgreer
Draw the Line: Bringing Comic Artist together to Create Effective Political Change.
“In response to the political climate around the world, Myfanwy Tristram wanted to give voice to people feeling hopeless and powerless. The result? Draw The Line, a project that brought together over 100 comic artists sharing practical ways to take positive action. The site is a toolkit for people who want to make a difference, big or small, and offers resources for engaged organizations and campaigns. Myfanwy tells us how the website came to life, and the crowdfunding effort to make the printed version of Draw The Line a reality.”
comics 
may 2018 by paulgreer
“I’m Sick of Graphic Novels”: An Interview with Craig Thompson
When Craig Thompson’s Carnet de Voyage was released in 2004 it was a book that was immediately beloved by a lot of readers, and by a lot of artists as well. The book reproduces pages of Thompson’s sketchbook on a trip through Europe and North Africa following the release of Blankets while he was on an extended book tour and vacation. Since the book was initially released, Thompson has published Habibi and Space Dumplins, and now Drawn and Quarterly has published a new hardcover edition of Carnet. The edition includes new pages drawn to give some background about Thompson’s first trip to France as well as a more recent one and gives some information about how the book was made. I’ve loved the book since it was first published and though I’ve interviewed Thompson in the past, I wanted to talk about drawing from life, the practice of keeping a sketchbook, and how it’s unlike making a comic in many ways. Thompson also talked about some of his upcoming projects, his need to have “a real human quality to the line.” and why he wants to serialize his next graphic novel.
comics  essays 
april 2018 by paulgreer
The 100 Most Influential Pages in Comic Book History
From Superman to Smile, Mickey to Maus: Tracing the evolution of comic books by looking at the pictures, panels, and text that brought them to life.
comics  bffr  link 
april 2018 by paulgreer
It's Nice That | Baptiste Virot's dizzy and disorientating new comic, Delirium
Acid-drenched colours and vibrant compositions permeate Animal Press’ archive of risograph zines and illustrations. The Belgian-Korean publishing house was originally set up in 2013 by Jinhee Han who was subsequently joined by It’s Nice That’s much-loved illustrator Baptiste Virot. After printing multiple publications in South Korea, the duo moved back to Belgium but didn’t completely cut their Korean tie. “We spent more than two and a half months producing our first two books of the year because we wanted to print them ourselves. It took a really long time. It was difficult but fun. We then met a guy in Seoul who loved printing so we proposed he start his own riso atelier. He followed our advice and named it Animal Print. We now work with Animal Print in order to produce as many publications as possible,” Jinhee tells It’s Nice That.
comics 
april 2018 by paulgreer
A conversation between Katsuhiro Otomo and Takehiko Inoue
Men’s culture magazine Brutus did a special issue on Katsuhiro Otomo back in April 2012, when Otomo was doing his giant exhibition where he displayed the original handdrawn pictures of every page of Akira. (There was also talk about him starting a new series, but that has still yet to materialize, two and a half years since.) The Brutus special included a conversation between Otomo and fellow supertitan Takehiko Inoue, which has somehow gone untranslated into English… until now.
comics 
april 2018 by paulgreer
Love and Rockets' Jaime Hernandez Creates Graphic Novel for Kids
Children’s publisher Toon Books is marking its 10th anniversary with the release of The Dragon Slayer: Folktales from Latin America, a bilingual graphic novel for young readers by Jaime Hernandez, co-creator of the acclaimed Love and Rockets indie comics series.
comics 
april 2018 by paulgreer
Cartoon Clouds
What’s the point of making art in a technological era? This question, and variations of it, make up the heart of Joseph Remnant’s first longform graphic narrative, Cartoon Clouds. Clouds follows freshly minted art school graduate Seth Fallon through insecurity, uncertainty, poverty, and the pretentious Cincinnati art scene. A small nexus of art grads trying to “make it” as serious artists in an increasingly pop-culturized contemporary market succeed to various degrees — or get stuck in the cogs of unrelenting capitalistic machinery. The tale focuses on the humdrum futility of this post-grad life and the very real choice perhaps all young adults must make: to either follow or abandon their idealistic dreams
comics 
march 2018 by paulgreer
Vacation
Blexbolex has cracked the code. The French cartoonist with the name that sounds like a friendly robot has worked in a wide variety of styles, from the simple interlocking blocks of bright color seen in his kid's books People and Seasons, to the whirls of limited-palette decoration in his very not-kid's books No Man's Land and Dogcrime. His most recent book, the truly all-ages fable Ballad, added a profusion of neon dot screening to the mix. Through it all, the constant is that his imagery bypasses people's critical faculties and hits them right in the pleasure centers, from page directly into eyes and usually from there to the wallet. Putting a Blexbolex book right by the tiller was a great way to grab add-on sales when I was working comics retail. He makes stuff that people want before they even know what it is, just because of how good it looks.
comics 
march 2018 by paulgreer
International Women's Day 2018
Those familiar with Doodles know that we frequently celebrate extraordinary women throughout history such as prominent inventors, scientists, writers, artists, activists, philanthropists, and so on. Today, we wanted to take the opportunity to celebrate the stories and voices of another group of extraordinary women—the everyday women living all over the world.
comics  link 
march 2018 by paulgreer
A Digital Archive of Heavy Metal, the Influential "Adult Fantasy Magazine" featuring the Art of Moebius, H.R. Giger & More
In making a time capsule of the late 20th century, one would be remiss if they did not include at least an issue or two of Heavy Metal magazine. Yes, it specialized in unapologetically turning women in metal bras into sex objects. The gleeful amount of T&A on its covers, surrounded by spaceships, swords, and sorcery, mark it as a relic of its era that appealed to a specific demographic. But Heavy Metal was much more than sexy sci-fi mascots drawn in lurid pulpy styles. Along with its share of erotica, the “adult illustrated fantasy magazine” provided a vivid showcase for some of the most interesting artists and storytellers working in the mainstream and in various subgenres of fantasy and sci-fi. (It continues to do so.)
comics  link  bffr 
march 2018 by paulgreer
Ta-Nehisi Coates: Why I'm Writing 'Captain America'
"Two years ago I began taking up the childhood dream of writing comics. To say it is more difficult than it looks is to commit oneself to criminal understatement. Writers don’t write comics so much as they draw them with words. Everything has to be shown, a fact I knew going into the work, but could not truly know until I had actually done it. For two years I’ve lived in the world of Wakanda, writing the title Black Panther. I’ll continue working in that world. This summer, I’m entering a new one—the world of Captain America."
comics 
february 2018 by paulgreer
How to write a comic book by Greg Pak
1. Outline the whole thing.
2. Break the outline down into pages.
3. Write from the beginning, but if I get stuck, skip around and write the easier scenes first.
4. Go back and write the harder scenes, which are easier now that I’ve done the rest.
5. Rewrite the easier scenes now that I’ve written the harder scenes and know my story better.
6. Go through and edit everything multiple times.
7. Turn it in when I run out of time.
8. Enjoy that fourteen minutes of calm you get after turning in a script.
9. Work on revisions.
10. Figure out what it’s REALLY all about and make the subtle dialogue tweaks that bring out that deeper theme/emotional thread.
links  Comics 
january 2018 by paulgreer
Katzine: The Guatemala Issue – Katriona Chapman’s Autobio Series Continues to Display an Understated Charm and Make a Profound Connection with Its Audience
Over the last couple of years Katriona Chapman’s amiable and beautifully crafted autobiographical series Katzine has fast become one of the most respected mainstays of the UK indie scene combining, as it does, its author’s welcoming on-page presence and her gorgeously shaded illustrative tones. Comprising gentle social commentary, addictive trivia and small insights into her everyday routine, it’s almost a sequential art Sunday supplement version of Chapman’s life.
twt  comics 
january 2018 by paulgreer
Where Has This Amazing Comic Book Art Been All My Life?
François Schuiten, like the creator of Tintin, is Belgian, and he’s best known for his drawing in the series Les Cités Obscures, a collaboration with his childhood friend, Benoît Peeters. They first worked together at the age of 12 on a school magazine; Benoît wrote the fictional stories, Fançois made the imaginative drawings, and pretty soon the faculty tried to stop them from publishing it, preferring Latin translations and moralizing anecdotes as more appropriate subject matters.
comics 
january 2018 by paulgreer
The Best Comics of 2017
We asked a wide array of our contributors and other comics figures to share their favorite comics from the past calendar year. In the interests of keeping things individual and unpredictable, we let our listmakers choose their own criteria for inclusion, decide for themselves whether or not their selections needed explanation, and stop their lists at whatever number they felt was appropriate.
comics  twt 
january 2018 by paulgreer
A Spine-Tingling New Book Collects Artist Brian Coldrick's Single-Panel Ghost Stories
A year back, we spotlighted the excellently spooky work of artist Brian Coldrick, creator of webcomic Behind You. Now, his illustrations have been compiled into a book from IDW, titled Behind You: One-Shot Horror Stories. We’ve got a peek at some of the gorgeously-rendered nightmares within.
Comics 
november 2017 by paulgreer
Interview with Sarah Andersen of Sarah's Scribble's
"As one of the most relatable webcomics on the internet, Sarah’s Scribbles is more than a comic; it’s a way of life. It speaks to us for the same reasons that it’s hilarious: everyday occurrences and opinions put into the cute, LOL framework of a well-illustrated, no frills set of squares to which we react by uttering the Real McCoy of all assertions: “that’s so true!” Sarah took the time to share some insights into her webcomic, processes and person, so read on and discover why we rightly hold a place for these scribbles in our hearts."
Comics 
september 2017 by paulgreer
An Interview with José Muñoz | The Comics Journal
"Yes, it was a paradise. There were different languages, backgrounds, cultural viewpoints that were circulating around and trading funny and/or tragic stories with each other. The stories mixed together fluidly, spontaneously, through films, historietas, literature, and radio. There, reality and imaginative fiction and other fantastical stories came together to produce an intimate mix that, it seems to me, encouraged us greatly. We lived near, and in, the wide open spaces of the Argentine pampa lowlands, something that needed us to fill it with stories. I and others believed that everything that we read, watched, and listened to was happening to us, was happening there. Parallel realities leapt out from the pages and the screens into our surroundings, into our souls. Argentina tried, but did not fully succeed, in making immigrants forget their pasts. And Buenos Aires was infused with a cosmopolitan atmosphere; we were and we could be, anywhere. Calé, Arlt, Ferro, Borges, Solano López, Hudson, Dickens, Bradbury, Monicelli, Bergman, Bioy Casares, Oesterheld, Breccia, Pratt, Roume, Chandler – they all spoke to us of Buenos Aires, of Argentina, and of the world that surrounded us from the pampa to Irkutsk, being everywhere all at once. I suppose it was the same in New York. I imagine it that way as well, feverish."
quotes  comics 
august 2017 by paulgreer
Shiva: to protect or destroy?
"Shiva is a young girl living in an abandoned, woodland village in this opening volume of Nagabe's masterfully paced folk-fantasy. Her sole companion is a tall, black, meticulously-dressed creature, whom she addresses as 'teacher,' and who serves as Shiva's guardian. Semi-humanoid in shape, with a head that is a cross between bird and ram, a beak that is not a beak; long, curling elegant horns, fur, and a tail, Teacher and Shiva are close (despite their coming together indicated to have been a fairly recent turn of events), each unperturbed by the other. Due to unspecified reasons, the two are forbidden to touch. Shiva appears unaware of much, apart from that used to have an aunt, whose fate is unclear, and whose return she eagerly awaits although Teacher knows such a turn of events is unlikely..."
comics 
august 2017 by paulgreer
8 Ways Comic Book Legend Jack Kirby Fought Fascism
"Jack Kirby—co-creator of the Marvel Universe and big chunks of DC’s—remains one of the most influential writer/artists in the history of comics. Many of Kirby’s works involve the fight against fascism, embodied in characters such as Doctor Doom and the Red Skull. This wasn’t just an imaginary battle for Kirby, who killed Nazis in World War II and was ready to throw down with any fascists he encountered stateside."
comics 
august 2017 by paulgreer
Late… (contains NSFW ads)
So, this happened two weeks ago.
comics 
july 2017 by paulgreer
Graphic novelist Jillian Tamaki: 'Our brains are being rewired to exist online'
"In one of Jillian Tamaki’s comic-book stories, entitled 1. Jenny, a “mirror Facebook” appears on the internet. At first, it looks like it is merely a duplicate of the familiar social network – until small changes begin to appear on everyone’s profiles. Like most internet phenomena, it is “all anyone could talk about for two weeks”, considered “playful at best, mischievous at worst”. But as Jenny watches the mysterious mirror-Jenny’s life diverge from her own in tiny ways – growing her hair long, watching Top Gun – she grows increasingly obsessed with the life that could be hers; wishing, all the same, that “she had followed through with her threats to quit Facebook. (Threatening to whom?)”"
comics 
july 2017 by paulgreer
The Victory Motel – Lives Revolve Around One Another in Owen D. Pomery’s Bleak and Pensive Collection of Shorts
“"To all who wander lost and take sick solace in the plight of others.”

Those ominous words open Owen D. Pomery’s latest comic The Victory Motel – debuting this weekend at the inaugural South London Comic and Zine Fair – and seem to rather neatly encapsulate the weary existentialism of so much of his work in one cynically profound soundbite. Pomery began his route into comics through self-publishing before becoming one of the staple components of the Avery Hill Publishing creative machine via The Megatherium Club, Reads and his acclaimed Between the Billboards."
comics 
july 2017 by paulgreer
In an artistic league of its own - Medieval manuscripts blog
No matter how long you’ve worked with medieval manuscripts, there's always one that completely surprises you. One manuscript that has astonished many scholars, and still inspires debate, is the combination of music, texts and images in the mid-11th-century portion of Cotton MS Caligula A XIV, known as the Caligula Troper or Cotton Troper. The Caligula Troper has been described as ‘completely unexpected in a mid-eleventh-century English context’ (T.A. Heslop, ‘Manuscript illumination at Worcester, c. 1055–1065’, in The Cambridge Illuminations: The Conference Papers ed. by Stella Panayotova (London: Harvey Miller, 2007), p. 69). Not only is it illustrated, which is unusual for surviving early English musical manuscripts, but the style of its illustrations is unparalleled elsewhere.
Comics 
june 2017 by paulgreer
First, Emil Ferris Was Paralyzed. Then Her Book Got Lost at Sea.
Like many of the best monster stories, Emil Ferris’s true-life horror tale starts with a bite. But more about that in a moment.

First, a word concerning Ms. Ferris’s blood-tingling debut graphic novel, “My Favorite Thing Is Monsters,” which oozes with the secrets and hungers that shadow childhood. Set in turbulent, late 1960s Chicago, it braids vintage monster imagery with the preternatural curiosity of a 10-year-old named Karen Reyes, who fancies herself a wolf girl.

According to Art Spiegelman, creator of “Maus”: “Emil Ferris is one of the most important comics artists of our time.”

Now, about that bite. It came 15 years ago when Ms. Ferris, who is 55, contracted West Nile virus from a mosquito. “I woke up in a hospital room three weeks after being admitted,” she recalled in a phone interview. “I was paralyzed from the waist down. I couldn’t speak. And I’d lost the use of my right hand, so I couldn’t draw.”
comics 
may 2017 by paulgreer
This Is You When You're Alone Missing Somebody - Creators
Like most lovers of fashion, Sarah Maxwell decided to go to Paris to fully immerse herself in all the colors, textures, and designs that she could find. But unlike most people interested in fashion, she used that passion to create a hybrid style: fashion illustration mixed with a comic book aesthetic.
comics 
may 2017 by paulgreer
On Indie Comics, Women and Korean Ghosts - The Wizardry of Artist Hellen Jo — Giant Robot Media
As an adult, I've always been a pretty political person and by extension, my art is also inherently political and feminist, but I also tended to avoid any explicit discussion of my principles and beliefs in my work directly. However, given the now-daily assault on the rights of all marginalized people, I've been a little more outspoken on my raging discontent. I've realized how important it is for people who view my work to know how I feel about intersectional feminism (it's the only feminism) and the patriarchy (fuck it). So far, it seems like only a few people who've been following my work have been surprised by where I stand, and even then, I'm surprised by their surprise; I mean, all I draw are powerful, mean girls who have no respect for authority so how they have possibly not known?
comics  links 
may 2017 by paulgreer
Defying the norms of graphic novels, 'My Favorite Thing is Monsters' dazzles critics of all stripes | Tampa Bay Times
It's unheard of in the comic book world for something like My Favorite Thing Is Monsters to be sold out everywhere.
comics 
may 2017 by paulgreer
Weekly comic fromclassmate, Marceline. Earth name: Hallie...
Weekly comic fromclassmate, Marceline. Earth name: Hallie Funk
comics 
may 2017 by paulgreer
“I Felt that Comics Could Play Various Roles Within the Theatre of Healthcare” – Ian Williams on Comics as Social Activism and the Birth of Graphic Medicine
Comics are complex and packed with information, yet easily absorbed, and can play around with time and internal and external worlds. I think it is this playfulness that lends itself to autobiography so well. As Charles Hatfield points out, no one has to get too hung up on issues of truth and fiction, they can be merged to make a the best story, and the obvious constructedness of the comic form allows a large degree of artistic license when compared to prose or documentary film-making.
quotes  comics 
april 2017 by paulgreer
4 Ways Comic Books Are Losing Touch With Their Audience
Recently, when asked about falling comic sales, Marvel's senior vice president of print, sales, and marketing remarked, "What we heard was that people didn't want any more diversity." He'd later go on to attempt to clarify his statements, but that desperate cover-up was like trying to fix a stab wound with a bandage made of knives. The damage had been done.
comics 
april 2017 by paulgreer
Marvel boss says diversity's killing sales - BBC Newsbeat
A boss at Marvel has blamed a fall in sales on its move towards more diverse characters.
David Gabriel, who's vice president of sales, claims readers are "turning their noses up" at diversity and don't "want female characters out there".
comics 
april 2017 by paulgreer
Free your mind: the underground comics of Skip Williamson – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian
The US comic artist Skip Williamson has died, leaving behind hilarious work that pokes fun at the hypocrisies on both sides of the political spectrum
comics  links 
march 2017 by paulgreer
Elektra: Assassin's Political Satire Cuts Deep 30 Years Later :: Comics :: Features :: Paste
With their emphasis on supervillainy, comic books are the perfect genre for satirizing politicians who appear dastardly on a good day and demonic on a bad one. Warren Ellis’ Vertigo series Transmetropolitan features The Smiler, a smarmy presidential candidate who makes Eliot Spitzer look like a kids’ cartoon. In the DC Universe, Superman’s nemesis and all-around bad guy Lex Luthor became President a few reboots ago. Current Image Comic Citizen Jack is about a presidential candidate who literally sells his soul to the devil.
comics 
march 2017 by paulgreer
10 female cartoonists you need to know · For Our Consideration · The A.V. Club
"Today, we once again take the opportunity to celebrate some of the fantastic women cartoonists and artists working in comics. On the one hand, it’s absolutely strange to continue to have “women in X field” features when women make up more than half the world’s population, and sure, it’d be nice to be beyond the engagement of these reductive stances. On the other hand, we’re not even close to parity, and lists like this can be very effective in quickly introducing work that’s overlooked. So, yes, these are all female artists, but these are all excellent artists, full stop. Here’s a selection of artists who you may not be as familiar with, but who are producing interesting and brilliant work—work that is resonating within the medium and with audiences. And that’s what we aim to recognize and celebrate." via @katiewest
comics  links 
march 2017 by paulgreer
Reliving Jaime Hernandez's The Death of Speedy - 30 Years Later ~ Panel Patter
Reliving Jaime Hernandez's "The Death of Speedy" 30 Years Later

Just another gang banger and another senseless death.
comics 
march 2017 by paulgreer
Emil Ferris: 'I didn’t want to be a woman – being a monster was the best solution' | Books | The Guardian
There has never been a debut graphic novel quite like Emil Ferris’s My Favorite Thing Is Monsters. The 55-year-old artist’s first published work, which came out last week, is a sweeping 60s-era murder mystery set in the cartoonist’s native Chicago. It’s composed of ballpoint pen drawings on wide-ruled notebook paper and is the first half of the story with the second volume out in October. Before she began work on Monsters, Ferris paid the bills with freelance work as an illustrator and a toy designer, making figurines for McDonald’s – she sculpted the Mulan line of Happy Meal prizes for one of the fast food behemoth’s subcontractors – and for Tokyo toymaker Tomy, for whom she worked making the Tea Bunnies line of dolls.
comics 
february 2017 by paulgreer
The Best Short-Form Comics of 2016
The more I read, the less clear I am about the difference between mini-comics and other comics. Consider the output from Retrofit, for example: are these mini-comics, standard comics, or something else? How much does the length of a mini-comic impact this classification? I will use Kurt Wolfgang’s instructive slogan (“Mini-Comics: You Know ‘Em When You See ‘Em”) and present my top short-form comics of the year, be they self-published, published by someone else, or (in a few cases) appearing on the web. The usual caveats apply here, as I’ve not read a bunch of key short-form comics from 2016 yet (Ganges 5, the latest Uptight, King Cat 76, Frontier #12 and #13, , Your Black Friend, and minis from Simon Moreton, for example.)
comics 
january 2017 by paulgreer
Week One
Eli Valley is a writer and artist whose work has been featured in The Nation, The New Republic, The Village Voice, The Guardian, and elsewhere.
comics 
january 2017 by paulgreer
The Best Comics of 2016 (According to Some)
We asked our contributors to send us their Best of 2016 lists. Many obliged! Thanks to all for doing this. Now onto 2017. -Eds.
comics 
january 2017 by paulgreer
Celebrating 2016: Ten UK Small Press Comics You Need to Own!
Welcome to the fifth annual ‘Ten UK Small Press Comics You Need to Own!’ round-up here in ‘Small Pressganged’! This celebration of the self and micropublishing world has become something of a New Year tradition here at Broken Frontier as I select just ten of the comics I reviewed in this column over the previous twelve months that I feel most represent the diversity of approaches to the form on offer on the UK scene in that time. That also means that some of the comics below may have been published prior to 2016. I’m always working in arrears in ‘Small Pressganged’…
comics 
january 2017 by paulgreer
Katzine: The Boat Issue – Katriona Chapman’s Quietly Life-Affirming Series Continues to Delight Its Audience
When a small press publication is as consistently excellent as Katriona Chapman’s very personal and individual series Katzine it’s sometimes easy to focus attention elsewhere on books that aren’t getting similar word of mouth in reviews and on social media. That seems to have been very much the case with Katzine at BF in 2016 as I realised coming into this review that we haven’t given it coverage since this artist’s commentary back in March!
comics 
december 2016 by paulgreer
How Peanuts Used Peppermint Patty To Talk About Politics
Aside from Charlie Brown, Peppermint Patty is the most well-thought out, deeply characterized member of the Peanuts gang. Charles Schulz told some heartbreaking stories about unrequited love, single parenthood, gender norms, and deep-seated insecurities—themes that did not normally appear on the Sunday funnies page. With unique characterization that helped her gain the audience’s sympathy and trust, Peppermint Patty was usually the delivery person of those themes.
comics 
december 2016 by paulgreer
Rob’s 6th Annual Top 20 Comics List: The 2016 Edition
At times like these it's easy to wonder: "Why bother with stuff like a Best Of Year list?" But moving forward and celebrating art and creative expression, even in the midst of calamitous world events, can never be a bad thing. Right? Plus this is my 6th annual Fave Comics list and old OCD-ish habits do die hard...so I'm forging ahead, shining a light through the surrounding fog of dread & fear onto some real good stuff–the stuff I liked best in what turned to be a pretty good year for comics after all. This time around I broke it down into my ten favorite books and ten favorite minicomics/floppies–with the strict ground rule that everything had to have been published during this terrible, horrible, no-good, very-bad-but-still-with-some-bright-spots year. Enjoy, and let's all stay strong and fight back against what’s coming, just around the corner. And good riddance to you, 2016: the very mention of your name should now & forever carry a fucking Trigger Warning.
comics 
december 2016 by paulgreer
Machine Man by Kirby
Jack Kirby’s Machine Man belongs to multiple worlds, both on the level of plot and in the circumstances of its creation. Kirby devised Machine Man (aka X-51, aka Aaron Stack) during his return to Marvel in the late ’70s, as a character in his loose adaptation of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Although the company’s license to publish 2001 comics later expired, Machine Man fell under Marvel IP and fell into the Marvel universe, wrestling with rival robots, the US military, and his own existential malaise. The character’s name sums it up—he’s machine and man, an artificial intelligence that insists on its humanity. Machine Man: The Complete Collection covers the character’s brief post-2001 series, including Kirby’s issues (the first nine), a few installments of The Incredible Hulk featuring X-51, and issues 10 through 19, for which Steve Ditko provided art. These comics are not the best-remembered work of either artist, but the exceptional talents of Kirby and Ditko, balanced against the stories’ missteps, make the collection a fascinating, multifaceted book—no ordinary mixed bag.
comics 
november 2016 by paulgreer
“I only draw when I’m bursting to say something”: A Comics Roundtable
Liana Finck's cartoons appear regularly in The New Yorker. Her first graphic novel, A Bintel Brief, was published by Ecco Press in 2014. She posts cartoons on Instagram @lianafinck.

Amy Kurzweil’s graphic memoir Flying Couch (Catapult/Black Balloon 2016) debuted this month. Her cartoons appear in the The New Yorker and other places, and her short stories have been published in The Toast, Washington Square Review, Shenandoah and elsewhere. She teaches writing and comics at Parsons and the Fashion Institute of Technology.

MariNaomi has been making comics since the nineties, and has so far penned the graphic memoirs Kiss
comics 
november 2016 by paulgreer
4Panel, Volume 1
Canadian artist Mark Laliberte has been publishing his 4Panel experiments in the pages of Carousel magazine and on the web for quite some time now. They are the product of a less restrictive version of OuBaPo-style constrictions, which give artists certain parameters they have to work with, like including certain elements on a page, telling the story as a visual palindrome, or using the same images but different words in multiple panels. The sole constriction for this particular project is that each artist has to work with the old comic strip standard of four panels at a time forming a single, coherent unit. What goes into those panels is up to each artist, and for the first print volume of 4Panel, Laliberte chose three artists whose visual styles are certainly varied.
comics  links  twt 
november 2016 by paulgreer
Lyn Chevli, Co-Founder of Tits
Lyn Chevli, 84, who co-founded the first comic book written, drawn, and published solely by women, died October 8 at Laguna Beach, California, of age-related causes.
links  Comics 
october 2016 by paulgreer
Sponsoring the Myriad First Graphic Novel Competition 2017 – Winners, Finalists and Judges on the Vital Importance of this Crucial UK Comics Institution
It will come as absolutely no surprise to any regular visitor to Broken Frontier when I say that discovering, nurturing and championing new talent is at the heart of what I do here on the site. So it was an honour indeed a few years ago to be asked by publisher Myriad Editions to be a part of the judging panel for their 2014 First Graphic Novel Competition alongside the esteemed likes of Myriad’s own Creative Director Corinne Pearlman, novelist Meg Rosoff (How I Live Now) and graphic novelists Woodrow Phoenix (Rumble Strip) and Nicola Streeten (Billy, Me
Comics 
october 2016 by paulgreer
How 3 Latina Comic Book Artists Carved Out a Space in a Male-Dominated Industry - Remezcla
In 2014, comics historian and researcher Tim Hanley summed up the lack of diversity among comics creators with two stats: 1. Men outnumber women 9 to 1 at both DC and Marvel. 2. 79 percent of those who worked on comics in 2014 were white. FiveThirtyEight fairly acknowledges that changes are taking place and that Marvel and DC are actively looking to add more diversity to their teams. But we still have a long way to go until minorities and women have accurate representation.
Comics 
october 2016 by paulgreer
“You can’t keep recycling what’s happening.”
In a recent interview with The Guardian, cartoonist Ben Katchor was asked why his comics don’t look like anybody else’s. His answer is a great case for stealing old stuff:
Comics 
october 2016 by paulgreer
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