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petej : ethics   521

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Counting the Countless — Real Life
To summarize: Data science as currently constituted

provides new tools for state and corporate control and surveillance
discursively (and recursively) demands more participation in those tools when it fails
communicates through its control universalized views of what humans can be and locks us into those views.

Those don’t sound compatible with queerness to me. Quite the opposite: They sound like a framework that fundamentally results in the elimination of queerness — the destruction of autonomy, contextuality, and fluidity, all of which make us what we are and are often necessary to keep us safe.

If you’re a trans person or otherwise queer person interested in data science, I’m not saying, “Don’t become a data scientist under any circumstances.” I’m not your mother, and I get that people need to eat to survive. I’m just explaining why I refuse to teach or train people to be data scientists and why I think reformist approaches to data science are insufficient and that co-option into data science, even to fix the system, is fundamentally inimical unless your primary question is asking who is left out of those fixes. You need to make the decision that is right for your ethics of care.

For me, my ethics of care says that we should be working for a radical data science: a data science that is not controlling, eliminationist, assimilatory. A data science premised on enabling autonomous control of data, on enabling plural ways of being. A data science that preserves context and does not punish those who do not participate in the system.
gender  transgender  data  bias  ethics  norms  control  administrativeViolence  quantification  analysis  decision-making  surveillance  tracking 
august 2019 by petej
Is fair play in running more important than fairness to Caster Semenya as a human? | Gaby Hinsliff | Opinion | The Guardian
But both are different expressions of the same basic problem, which is that sport relies on strict binary divisions between men and women to create a level playing field. Yet society is drifting away from them, thanks not only to the shifting sands of gender identity but to greater medical understanding. There have almost certainly been elite sportswomen in the past with naturally sky-high testosterone levels that we simply didn’t know about. Semenya’s bad luck – and in some ways that of the experts asked to pass judgment on her – was to be born into a generation equipped with a more sophisticated but still incomplete scientific understanding of body chemistry, and vast anxiety about what it all means. Suddenly, sport’s sexual sorting hat is throwing up confused answers, and untangling them is a job for ethicists as much as for doctors.
SemenyaCaster  sport  sex  intersex  athletics  SouthAfrica  testosterone  transgender  fairness  ethics  discrimination 
may 2019 by petej
How to Survive the Next Era of Tech (Slow Down and Be Mindful) - The New York Times
That’s why the most important lesson I’ve gleaned in writing this column is this: Just slow down. Don’t jump on the newest thing. If it isn’t plagued with bugs or security nightmares, some other unexpected, emergent risk probably lies within it — and whatever its short-term benefits, you may live to regret it.

Yes, tech could make everything better. But we should be on guard for the ways it could make things worse — how self-driving cars could induce sprawl, how the “internet of things” could provoke apocalypse, how social media could ruin democracy.

Are these unlikely dangers? Maybe. But we live in unpredictable times. The unlikely happens. Be careful. Go slow.
technology  ethics  businessModels  advertising  Google  surveillanceCapitalism  Facebook  trust  pace 
december 2018 by petej
“When You Get That Wealthy, You Start to Buy Your Own Bullshit”: The Miseducation of Sheryl Sandberg | Vanity Fair
Why do so many M.B.A.s struggle to make the ethical decisions that seem so clear to the rest of us? Is it right to employ a scummy P.R. firm to deflect attention from our failures? Is it O.K. if we bury questions about user privacy and consent under a mountain of legalese? Can we get away with repeatedly choosing profits over principles and then promising that we will do better in the future?
SandbergSheryl  HarvardBusinessSchool  leadership  Facebook  management  transparency  anti-Semitism  conspiracyTheory  personalData  misuse  CambridgeAnalytica  ZuckerbergMark  delusion  morality  ethics  business 
november 2018 by petej
The UAE is trampling human rights. Man City must finally speak out | Simon Hattenstone | Opinion | The Guardian
Just to reiterate, Sheikh Mansour is not just a wealthy individual in the United Arab Emirates: he and his family run the country and make all the important decisions. People live and die by their rulings.
ManchesterCity  football  UAE  SheikhMansour  humanRights  HedgesMatthew  prison  injustice  ethics  GuardiolaPep 
november 2018 by petej
The Tech Backlash We Really Need - The New Atlantis
The tech backlash, emerging as it has within this centuries-old trajectory, will not achieve the perspective necessary to offer a substantive evaluation of our technological disorders. The critique emanates from within the system, assumes the overall beneficence of the system, and serves only to maximize the system’s power and efficiency by working out its bugs. Meanwhile, the big tech companies can rest ever more assured of their ability to withstand an occasional public battering and emerge unscathed so long as the bribe remains sufficiently enticing. So far, the tech backlash seems likely not to weaken the tech industry but to strengthen it, enhancing the power of the present techno-social configuration.

This is not, however, a case for either inaction or despair. It is, rather, a plea to make the most of the present moment when the curtain has been pulled back ever so slightly on the industry that does so much to shape our world. A backlash will not be enough; by definition it is sudden and fleeting and its course is determined by the forces against which it reacts. What is needed is a more sustained and clear-eyed reconsideration of our situation and a renewed capacity to imagine alternative configurations of the technological order.
technology  SiliconValley  Facebook  ZuckerbergMark  personalData  misuse  ethics  socialMedia  advertising  politics  discourse  HarrisTristan  design 
august 2018 by petej
Cambridge University rejected Facebook study over 'deceptive' privacy standards | Technology | The Guardian
Another panel member felt that information shared with Facebook friends should not be regarded as public data. In a response to Kogan’s appeal, the academic said: “Once you have persuaded someone to run your Facebook app, you can really only collect that subject’s data. What his or her friends have disclosed is by default disclosed to ‘friends’ only, that is, with an expectation of confidence.”

The ethics panel member added: “Facebook is rather deceptive on this and creates the appearance of a cosy and confidential peer group environment, as a means of gulling users into disclosing private information that they then sell to advertisers, but this doesn’t make it right to an ethical researcher to follow their lead.”

The academic also likened Facebook to a contagion. The letter sent in July 2015 said: “My view of Facebook is that it’s a bit like an infectious disease; you end up catching what your friends have. If there are bad apps, or malware, or even dodgy marketing offers, they get passed along through friendship networks. An ethical approach to using social networking data has to take account of this.”
UniversityOfCambridge  KoganAleksandr  research  Facebook  personalData  ethics  consent  socialMedia  privacy 
april 2018 by petej
UA Looks at 'Digital Traces' to Help Students | UANews
"It's kind of like a sensor that's embedded in them, which can be used for tracking them," Ram said of the card. "It's really not designed to track their social interactions, but you can, because you have a timestamp and location information."

Working in partnership with UA Information Technology, Ram gathered and analyzed data on freshman CatCard usage over a three-year period. She then used that data to create large networks mapping which students interacted with one another and how often.

For example, if Student A, on multiple occasions, uses her CatCard at the same location at roughly the same time as Student B, it would suggest a social interaction between the two.

Ram also looked at how students' interactions changed over time, by constructing networks two weeks at a time over a 12-week period.

"There are several quantitative measures you can extract from these networks, like the size of their social circle, and we can analyze changes in these networks to see if their social circle is shrinking or growing, and if the strength of their connections is increasing or decreasing over time," she said.
UniversityOfArizona  learningAnalytics  students  surveillance  bigData  tracking  ethics  consent  education  higherEducation  universities 
march 2018 by petej
The Business of 'Ed-Tech Trends'
Imagine that, instead of fawning over future-oriented “trends” or the future promise of products – be they virtual reality or “personalized learning” or “flexible seating” or what have you, that education technology actually centered itself on ethical practices – on an ethics of care. And imagine if education’s investors, philanthropists, and practitioners alike committed to addressing, say, economic inequality and racial segregation instead of simply committing to buying more tech.
edtech  trends  business  bias  influence  personalisation  philanthropy  ventureCapital  ethics  dctagged  dc:creator=WattersAudrey 
january 2018 by petej
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