recentpopularlog in

petej : games   212

« earlier  
Gamers and managers vs workers: the impossible (and gendered) standards imposed on game developers | Overland literary journal
There’s something here that often confuses outsiders. Why is it that fans, those most-passionate consumers of a product and who identify with the product on some deeply personal level, are often the ones who are most hateful and spiteful towards those individuals who create the thing they love? Often this gets explained away as an overly zealous and protective passion, but the answer is both more insidious and more straightforward: fans are not loyal to workers; fans are loyal to brands. This is especially true of gamers, that young and predominately male demographic explicitly and deliberately cultivated by videogame publishers throughout the 90s to identify strongly enough with a range of brands, to constantly invest money in new titles and hardware. The gamer’s allegiance is to ArenaNet, not the workers at ArenaNet who do the creative labour. Gamers are allies to corporations.

At the same time, the managerial class of the games industry has long seen the creative workers that actually produce games as disposable and easily replaceable. ‘A passion for games’ is held up as a primary requirement for working in the videogame industry, and those who have been brought up through the gamer identity are offered low wages and demanded to do unpaid overtime in return for so generously being given the opportunity to work in the industry.
work  labour  employment  developers  games  gaming  gamergate  misogyny  socialMedia  harassment  mansplaining  women  gender  gamers 
5 weeks ago by petej
Escape to another world | 1843
A life spent buried in video games, scraping by on meagre pay from irregular work or dependent on others, might seem empty and sad. Whether it is emptier and sadder than one spent buried in finance, accumulating points during long hours at the office while neglecting other aspects of life, is a matter of perspective. But what does seem clear is that the choices we make in life are shaped by the options available to us. A society that dislikes the idea of young men gaming their days away should perhaps invest in more dynamic difficulty adjustment in real life. And a society which regards such adjustments as fundamentally unfair should be more tolerant of those who choose to spend their time in an alternate reality, enjoying the distractions and the succour it provides to those who feel that the outside world is more rigged than the game.
work  labour  jobs  employment  unemployment  games  gaming  leisure  escapism  dctagged  dc:creator=AventRyan 
march 2017 by petej
What Is Pokemon Go? - The Atlantic
"And while Pokémon is popular and basically harmless, the alternating reality it offers is still that of a branded, licensed, kiddie cock-fighting fantasy."

"Pokémon Go can be both a delightful new mechanism for urban and social discovery, and also a ghastly reminder that when it comes to culture, sequels rule. It’s easy to look at Pokémon Go and wonder if the game’s success might underwrite other, less trite or brazenly commercial examples of the genre. But that’s what the creators of pervasive games have been thinking for years, and still almost all of them are advertisements. Reality is and always has been augmented, it turns out. But not with video feeds of twenty-year old monsters in balls atop local landmarks. Rather, with swindlers shilling their wares to the everyfolk, whose ensuing dance of embrace and resistance is always as beautiful as it is ugly."
games  ARG  Pokemon  PokemonGo  business  marketing  Google  advertising  dctagged  dc:craetor=BogostIan  augmentedReality 
july 2016 by petej
Digital Devices and Learning to Grow Up | The Frailest Thing
"encouraging people to habitually render other human beings unworthy of their attention seems like a poor way to build a just and equitable society"
technology  children  communication  mobilePhones  games  rudeness  attention  parenting  age  Internet 
july 2015 by petej
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read