recentpopularlog in

petej : labour   1209

« earlier  
keep seeing people angry about ‘misuse’ of the term emotional labour so thought I would try and articulate some of the uses I see both within and outside of the canonical definition, what seems to be driving the expanded uses of the term and why they
keep seeing people angry about ‘misuse’ of the term emotional labour so thought I would try and articulate some of the uses I see both within and outside of the canonical definition, what seems to be driving the expanded uses of the term and why they might be important. THREAD!!!
emotionalLabour  work  labour  care 
6 weeks ago by petej
I am a data factory (and so are you) | ROUGH TYPE
The factory metaphor makes clear what the mining metaphor obscures: We work for the Facebooks and Googles of the world, and the work we do is increasingly indistinguishable from the lives we lead.
Facebook  socialMedia  work  labour  digitalLabour  control  manipulation  behaviour  personalData  ownership  nationalisation  surveillance  SiliconValley  dctagged  dc:creator=CarrNick 
7 weeks ago by petej
Will Elon Musk's 120-hour week stop us worshipping workaholism? | Technology | The Guardian
But while you can take the engineer out of the workplace, you can’t stop them being an engineer, and there is a risk that work/life balance becomes just another thing to optimise for peak performance.

“If you look in the Silicon Valley culture – and this also extends to many corporations,” says Spicer, “executives there are not just obsessed with making their work more productive, but with making their whole life more productive. So they spend a huge amount of time thinking and talking and engaging with these questions about how do you eat in the most efficient way, how do you exercise in the most efficient way, how do you take all these little parts of your life and make them more efficient?”
work  labour  MuskElon  SiliconValley  capitalism  workEthic  overwork  Tesla  SpaceX  health  performance  productivity 
7 weeks ago by petej
Bullshit jobs and the yoke of managerial feudalism - Open Future
I think a lot of the—often quite legitimate—rancor directed at the “liberal elite” is based on resentment of those working-class people see as having effectively grabbed all the jobs where you’ll actually get paid well to do something that’s both fun and creative, but also, obviously benefits society. If you can’t afford to send your kid to a top college and then support them for 2-3 years doing unpaid internships in some place like New York or San Francisco, forget it, you’re locked out.

For everybody else, unless you get very lucky, your choices are largely limited to two options. You can get a basically bullshit job, which will pay the rent but leave you wracked with the guilty feeling that you are being forced, against your will, to be a fraud and a parasite. Or, you can get a helpful, useful job taking care of people, making or moving or maintaining things that people want or need - but then, likely you will be paid so little you won’t be able to take care of your own family.

There is an almost perfect inverse relation between how much your work directly benefits others, and remuneration. The result is a toxic political culture of resentment.

Those in the largely pointless jobs secretly resent teachers or even auto workers, who actually get to do something useful, and feel it’s outrageous when they demand nice salaries and health care and paid vacations too. Working class people who get to do mostly useful things, resent the liberal elite who grabbed all the useful or beneficial work which actually does pay well and treats you with dignity and respect.
work  labour  jobs  lateCapitalism  bullshitJobs  bureaucracy  management  polarisation  exclusion  resentment  economics  dctagged  dc:creator=GraeberDavid 
7 weeks ago by petej
“What Have We Done?”: Silicon Valley Engineers Fear They've Created a Monster | Vanity Fair
Yet even as we roundly condemned the tech world’s treatment of a vulnerable new class of worker, we knew the stakes were much higher: high enough to alter the future of work itself, to the detriment of all but a select few. “Most people,” I said, interrupting the hubbub, “don’t even see the problem unless they’re on the inside.” Everyone nodded. The risk, we agreed, is that the gig economy will become the only economy, swallowing up entire groups of employees who hold full-time jobs, and that it will, eventually, displace us all. The bigger risk, however, is that the only people who understand the looming threat are the ones enabling it.
gigEconomy  Uber  Instacart  work  labour  exploitation  employment  algorithms  SiliconValley  artificialIntelligence 
9 weeks ago by petej
Gamers and managers vs workers: the impossible (and gendered) standards imposed on game developers | Overland literary journal
There’s something here that often confuses outsiders. Why is it that fans, those most-passionate consumers of a product and who identify with the product on some deeply personal level, are often the ones who are most hateful and spiteful towards those individuals who create the thing they love? Often this gets explained away as an overly zealous and protective passion, but the answer is both more insidious and more straightforward: fans are not loyal to workers; fans are loyal to brands. This is especially true of gamers, that young and predominately male demographic explicitly and deliberately cultivated by videogame publishers throughout the 90s to identify strongly enough with a range of brands, to constantly invest money in new titles and hardware. The gamer’s allegiance is to ArenaNet, not the workers at ArenaNet who do the creative labour. Gamers are allies to corporations.

At the same time, the managerial class of the games industry has long seen the creative workers that actually produce games as disposable and easily replaceable. ‘A passion for games’ is held up as a primary requirement for working in the videogame industry, and those who have been brought up through the gamer identity are offered low wages and demanded to do unpaid overtime in return for so generously being given the opportunity to work in the industry.
work  labour  employment  developers  games  gaming  gamergate  misogyny  socialMedia  harassment  mansplaining  women  gender  gamers 
july 2018 by petej
Now is the Time for Worker Power in the Tech Industry | Novara Media
For many tech workers, the idea of joining a trade union seems ridiculous – unions are often thought of as a relic of an older time, irrelevant to the meritocracy that is the tech industry.
The class composition of the industry.

Why is this? If we take a structural approach to the tech industry, we see that the workforce is effectively bifurcated in such a way as to contain potential challenges from below. Those with high leverage over production – say, senior software engineers who know how the systems work – are paid exceedingly well, often partly in stock, and given lavish perks. This is especially true in Silicon Valley, where a frothy startup investment environment forces tech companies of all sizes to offer lavish benefits in order to compete for ‘talent’. Correspondingly, workers with the most leverage over production are convinced they are not actually workers, and that their interests align with their company instead of their class. This amounts to a strategic isolation of the few employees with the most power to disrupt production, who are then showered with material benefits to dissuade them from ever exercising that power.
technology  work  labour  employment  class  tradeUnions  activism  informationTechnology  SiliconValley  power 
july 2018 by petej
How to write the perfect CV – first, refuse to play this stupid game | Money | The Guardian
Still, I lived at time when many of us wanted to be considered unemployable, so we could get the dole and do our own thing. We would be sent to interviews even when we had written “satanism and sulphate” for our interests. My mate, who really did not want a job, was doing worryingly well in an interview, so when they got to the “What makes you want to be part of this team?” question, he had to think fast. “Because the voices told me to.” Phew! He was able to carry on being unemployed until he became a pop star.
work  labour  jobs  CV  recruitment  commodification  truth  honesty  deception  dctagged  dc:creator=MooreSuzanne 
june 2018 by petej
I Don’t Know How to Waste Time on the Internet Anymore
What happened is that the internet stopped being something you went to in order to separate from the real world — from your job and your work and your obligations and responsibilities. It’s not the place you seek to waste time, but the place you go to so that you’ll someday have time to waste. The internet is a utility world for me now. It is efficient and all-encompassing. It is not very much fun.
Internet  socialMedia  fun  Twitter  Facebook  control  surveillance  work  labour 
may 2018 by petej
Marx, labor and the problem with Kathi Weeks | The Real Movement
Marx’s own criticism of labor had nothing to do with this — he argued the laborer herself would become superfluous under the capitalist mode of production. Postone, who Weeks cites at one point, make the same point in his own book. The idea that labor and the working class itself would become superfluous — i.e., that a great mass of workers would themselves become unnecessary to the production of material wealth — never appears in Weeks’ book. The desperate demand of the working class for jobs is but a reflex of the material reality that, for the production of real wealth, it is entirely redundant.

Is there a connection between the superfluity of labor and the sudden cessation of labor’s demand for fewer hours? How would we know, since Weeks has no idea these two events meet in the Great Depression; when the overworked millions, who took to the street of Europe and the United States to demand reduction of hours of labor, were replaced by millions of unemployed workers in every advanced country, who no longer demand freedom from work but were forced to beg for work — any work, even in the defense industries where the means for their own destruction were built.
WeeksKathi  work  labour  capitalism  hours  surplusValue  Weber  workEthic  tradeUnions  Marx  jobs  employment  unemployment 
march 2018 by petej
EU migrant visas 'should be for those working antisocial hours' | UK news | The Guardian
Goodhart said: “A Brexit without a clear end to free movement in its current form is neither possible nor desirable, as it was clearly one of the biggest single factors behind the Brexit vote.

“One of the problems with freedom of movement is that it has created a new category of resident: someone who is neither a temporary visitor, such as a tourist, nor someone who is making a permanent commitment to a new country in the manner of the traditional immigrant. Many of those taking advantage of free movement in recent years have enjoyed the rights of the latter with the attitude of the former,” he said.
UK  EU  migration  work  labour  PolicyExchange  GoodhartDavid  hours  visas  Brexit  immigration  freedomOfMovement 
february 2018 by petej
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read