recentpopularlog in

pierredv : 5ghz   25

S.1426 : Aggregate power flux-density limits, at the FSS satellite orbit for radio local area network (RLAN) transmitters operating in the 5 150-5 250 MHz band sharing frequencies with the FSS (RR No. S5.447A)
"Aggregate power flux-density limits, at the FSS satellite orbit for radio local area network (RLAN) transmitters operating in the 5 150-5 250 MHz band sharing frequencies with the FSS (RR No. S5.447A)"

See also M.1454 on calculation of number of RLANs tolerable by FSS satellite receivers operating in 5150-5250 MHz
ITU-R  interference-limits  pfd  FSS  5GHz  harm-claim-thresholds 
november 2018 by pierredv
Automated frequency coordination emerges as compromise for unlicensed access to 6 GHz | PolicyTracker: Aug 2018
"A coalition of major companies with an interest in unlicensed spectrum access is advocating a form of light licensing called automated frequency coordination (AFC) for the 5925–7125 MHz range in the US. The idea is that AFC would prevent interference to the fixed links and C-band satellite uplinks that currently use the band by limiting the locations where radio local area networks (RLANs) can operate. RLANs would also have to periodically transmit identifying information so that the source of any given interference can be rapidly identified."

"PolicyTracker previously noted that advocates of unlicensed use of the 5925–7125 MHz band were proposing to mitigate against potential (supposedly rare) interference to incumbent installations by setting up a database of outdoor RLAN deployments, alongside mandatory transmission of identification information.

The AFC proposal builds on this to propose that RLAN master devices cannot operate in the same channel as an incumbent fixed link within a given exclusion zone. This would be enforced through an AFC function that contains a repository of the bands’ current usage. An exception would be made for indoor devices operating at low power."

"This proposal is supported by Apple, Broadcom, Cisco, Facebook, Google, Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), Intel, Microsoft, Qualcomm and Ruckus Networks"
PolicyTracker  5GHz  spectrum-sharing  6GHz 
august 2018 by pierredv
Industry Voices—Schoolar: Here comes unlicensed LTE … finally | FierceWireless, Aug 2017
T-Mobile launched commercial LTE-U networks across six cities in February. Furthermore, in June T-Mobile trialed LAA achieving 741 Mbps downlink, and plans to deploy it this year. Also in June, AT&T reported hitting 750 Mbps in its LTE-LAA trial, with its own plans for commercial launch by end of 2017. In the month of August, Verizon announced it is in the process of rolling out a commercial LTE-LAA network. The company also reported reaching 953 Mbps downlink speed in a recent trial. Outside of the U.S. (but in June as well), MTS of Russia has been trialing LTE-LAA. For these, and other operators, LTE using unlicensed spectrum helps get them to 1 Gbps LTE.
FierceWireless  LTE-U  unlicensed  5GHz  opinion  Verizon  T-Mobile  AT&T 
august 2017 by pierredv
UK regulator to allow Wi-Fi at 5.8 GHz before rest of EU — PolicyTracker: the spectrum management newsletter
Interference concerns came from users of the fixed satellite service; radar; programme making and special events equipment; broadband fixed wireless access; amateur radio and satellite; and short-range devices (SRDs), including drones. "We examined these coexistence arguments... and have not found a compelling reason not to authorise 5.8 GHz for Wi-Fi services given the benefits this extension will deliver for citizen[s] and consumers," Ofcom said. It set a proposed power limitation at 200 mW equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) per channel, with no fixed outdoor use, and with a requirement to implement specific techniques to avoid interference into radar.
PolicyTracker  Wi-Fi  Ofcom  Interference  radar  5GHz 
march 2017 by pierredv
Why we lost the weather radar channels
In twenty cases of reported interference, the following themes stood out (some of these overlap, so if you add them up you will get to more than 20):

DFS was disabled in three.
TDWR  5GHz  interference  radar  DFS 
september 2016 by pierredv
FOIA Request Turns Up Info on Non-FCC-Compliant Transmitters. | CommLawBlog
"AT&T’s Puerto Rico transmitter was certified for operation over 5735-5840 MHz, but it was being operated at a frequency outside that range. Moreover, the transmitter lacked the required capability to listen for weather radar signals, and if it found them, to avoid the frequencies on which they occur – a feature called “dynamic frequency selection,” or DFS. The transmitter was manufactured by Motorola, which knows how to comply with FCC technical rules. But the transmitter was non-compliant when FCC inspectors found it in operation – on a non-certified frequency and lacking DFS – in AT&T’s Puerto Rico system. Moreover, the FCC has identified other non-compliant transmitters operating in the same band. In every case we know of, the transmitter was made by Motorola, and all came from the same “Canopy” product line. What went wrong?"
CommLawBlog  Mike-Marcus  Mitchell-Lazarus  TDWR  interference  5GHz 
september 2016 by pierredv
Why Wi-Fi Stinks—and How to Fix It - IEEE Spectrum
Wi-Fi congestion will soon get even worse, thanks to the mobile-phone carriers, which have exhausted much of their exclusive spectrum. These wireless carriers are planning to off-load mobile-data transmissions, as much as 60 percent within the next three years, onto the unlicensed spectrum used by Wi-Fi.
IEEE-Spectrum  Wi-Fi  5GHz  DFS  radar 
july 2016 by pierredv
Improving spectrum access for consumers in the 5 GHz band | Ofcom May 2016
Consultation published 13|05|2016
"This document sets out proposals for increasing the amount of 5 GHz radio spectrum available for Wi-Fi and other related wireless technologies. It also invites the views of stakeholders on how our wider Wi-Fi strategy should be developed to meet consumer demand. "
"we propose to open up a further 125 MHz of 5 GHz spectrum at 5725-5850 MHz"
Ofcom  unlicensed  5GHz 
may 2016 by pierredv
NTIA Technical Report TR-12-486 - Case Study: Investigation of Interference into 5 GHz Weather Radars from Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure Devices, Part 3 - ITS
In early 2009, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) became aware of interference to Terminal Doppler Weather Radars (TDWRs) that operate in the 5600–5650 MHz band and provide measurements of gust fronts, windshear, microbursts, and other weather hazards for improved safety of operations in and around airports. National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) engineers, with assistance from FAA engineers, determined the interference to be caused by some unlicensed national information infrastructure (U NII) dynamic frequency selection (DFS) devices operating in the same frequency band as TDWR systems. These devices use DFS technology that is supposed to detect the presence of nearby co-channel radars and change operating frequencies to prevent interference to those radars. This report, the third of a three-part series, describes some U NII emission spectra and introduces an additional set of TDWR test waveforms that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) ...
NTIA  ITS  5GHz  TDWR 
march 2016 by pierredv
NTIA Technical Report TR-11-473 Case Study: Investigation of Interference into 5 GHz Weather Radars from Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure Devices, Part 1 - ITS
John E. Carroll; Frank H. Sanders; Robert L. Sole; Geoffrey Sanders Abstract: In early 2009, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) became aware of interference to Terminal Doppler Weather Radars (TDWRs) that operate in the 5600– 5650 MHz band and provide quantitative measurements of gust fronts, windshear, microbursts, and other weather hazards for improved safety of operations in and around major airports. This report describes field measurements and results from an examination of interference to a TDWR in San Juan, Puerto Rico from unlicensed national information infrastructure (U–NII) dynamic frequency selection (DFS) devices operating in the same frequency band. Several U–NII devices from different manufacturers were found to be causing interference into the TDWR. These devices operate in the same bands as these Federal radar systems, but employ DFS technology that is supposed to detect the presence of nearby radar systems and change operating frequencies to prevent interferenc
ITS  NTIA  5Ghz  interference  TDWR 
october 2015 by pierredv
NTIA Technical Report TR-11-479 Case Study: Investigation of Interference into 5 GHz Weather Radars from Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure Devices, Part 2
John E. Carroll; Geoffrey Sanders; Frank H. Sanders; Robert L. Sole Abstract: In early 2009, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) became aware of interference to Terminal Doppler Weather Radars (TDWRs) that operate in the 5600–5650 MHz band and provide quantitative measurements of gust fronts, windshear, microbursts, and other weather hazards for improved safety of operations in and around major airports. Institute for Telecommunication Sciences (ITS) engineers, with assistance from FAA engineers, determined the interference to be from unlicensed national information infrastructure (U-NII) dynamic frequency selection (DFS) devices, from several manufacturers, operating in the same frequency band as TDWR systems. These devices operate in the same bands as these Federal radar systems, but employ DFS technology that is supposed to detect the presence of nearby radar systems and change operating frequencies to prevent interference with incumbent radar systems. This report describes me
ITS  NTIA  5GHz  interference  TDWR 
october 2015 by pierredv
5 GHz U-NII (R&O) | FCC.gov March 2014
In the Matter of Revision of Part 15 of the Commission’s Rules to Permit Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure (U-NII) Devices in the 5 GHz Band FIRST REPORT AND ORDER
FCC  5GHz  rules  service  rules 
june 2014 by pierredv
Mimosa secures $20M in new funding to aid gigabit Wi-Fi backhaul product development - FierceWirelessTech May 2014
"It hasn't launched a product yet, but Mimosa Networks just snagged $20 million in Series C funding to help boost development and sales of the company's last-mile 802.11ac Wi-Fi platform for Internet service providers." "Using 4x4 802.11ac with multi-user MIMO (MU-MIMO), Mimosa's current radio operates in 5 GHz spectrum over bandwidths of up to 80 MHz and at modulation rates up to 256 QAM, reaching speeds of 1 Gbps and higher. Quantenna Communications is the exclusive supplier of 802.11ac Wave 2 technology to Mimosa for use in multiple outdoor Wi-Fi products. The two companies have also agreed to jointly develop an enhanced physical layer and link. In addition, Quantenna announced in April that it will introduce a new Wi-Fi chipset in 2015 that will include support for MIMO configurations up to 8x8, enabling speeds up to 10 Gbps. Mimosa indicated that it will use this new Wi-Fi chipset in its future products. Mimosa has also partnered with Airspan Networks..."
802.11ac  Mimosa  5GHz  Quantenna  Airspan 
may 2014 by pierredv
FCC opens up 100 MHz of spectrum in 5 GHz band for unlicensed Wi-Fi - FierceWireless
"The FCC voted 5-0 to adopt a First Report and Order that makes 100 MHz of the 5 GHz UNII-1 band "more useful for consumers and businesses, and reduce the potential for harmful interference to certain incumbent operations." At issue is the 5150-5250 MHz portion of the Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure (UNII) band, whose unlicensed use was restricted to lower wattage and indoor operations. The order eliminates a rule that had prohibited outdoor operations in the band and also increases allowable power levels in the band. However, the FCC staff said that the order also protects incumbent users, most notably mobile satellite service, by placing technical limits on the amount of energy that can be directed up toward satellites. As another measure to protect incumbent users, the FCC is going to require companies to notify the commission if they are deploying more than 1,000 access points in the UNII-1 band.i"
FCC  5GHz  U-NII  FierceWireless  unlicensed  spectrum-efficiency 
march 2014 by pierredv
Cable group disputes Globalstar's arguments against freeing 5.1 GHz band for Wi-Fi - FierceWirelessTech
"CableLabs and the University of Colorado conducted a second analysis of U-NII-1sharing, which again purports to show that shared Wi-Fi use in the Un-NII-1 band will not cause harmful interference. The new study uses a dynamic simulation that analyzes the interactions of every individual Globalstar satellite with Wi-Fi access points." "Globalstar currently uses the spectrum for four licensed MSS feeder links that serve some 85,000 customers globally. "
NCTA  Globalstar  Wi-Fi  5GHz  MSS  FierceWireless 
january 2014 by pierredv
Cambium pitches new 5 GHz platform for broadband access in rural, unserved markets - FierceWireless:Tech
"Cambium's ePMP is an integrated point-to-point (PTP) and point-to-multipoint (PMP) fixed wireless access solution, which the vendor said can deliver at least 200 Mbps of throughput using 2x2 MIMO-OFDM technologies. The vendor said ePMP is able to handle up to 120 subscribers per unit without service degradation due in part to spectral efficiency achieved through GPS sychronization. "
MIMO  point-to-point  microwave  GPS  5GHz 
october 2013 by pierredv
Report recommends more 5 GHz spectrum for Wi-Fi - FierceBroadbandWireless
Quote: The EC-commissioned study, written by J. Scott Marcus and John Burns, recommends efforts be pursued to make spectrum from 5150 MHz to 5925 MHz available globally for Wi-Fi and to make 2.6 GHz and 3.5 GHz "fully available for mobile use." Among other things, the study also calls for consultation on future licensing options for the 3.5 GHz band, which it said could be used for small cells and related backhaul. The report noted that the 5 GHz band has been lightly used, largely because most Wi-Fi activity is still concentrated in the 2.4 GHz band. "There is little practical evidence at this stage to indicate at what point the 5 GHz band might become congested," said the study, which noted 5 GHz take-up is increasing now that numerous client devices, including smartphones and tablets, have dual-band capability.
spectrum  EC  Scott  Marcus  5GHz  EuropeanCommission  FierceWireless 
august 2013 by pierredv
Atheros: 5, not 60 GHz is real future of Wi-Fi
"The emerging IEEE 802.11ac standard for delivering gigabit/speeds over 5 GHz represents the future of mainstream Wi-Fi, said William McFarland, vice president of technology for the Wi-Fi division of the cellular chip maker [Qualcomm Atheros]. The .11ad 60 GHz standard will play a complementary but more limited role, and beyond that the future is unclear, he said."
Wi-Fi  qualcomm  802.11ac  802.11ad  5GHz  60GHz  x:eetimes 
march 2012 by pierredv
Weather Radar Interference Enforcement | FCC.gov
From Rashmi Doshi via Mike Cotton, re question about Rashmi's comments at ISART that "The FCC Enforcement Bureau has levied numerous penalties on U-NII device operators for unauthorized use of such equipment" (the TDWR/U-NII interference case)
FCC  radar  enforcement  interference  5GHz  U-NII  TDWR 
december 2011 by pierredv

Copy this bookmark:





to read