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pierredv : aei   9

The Case for a $15 Minimum Wage Is Far From Settled - Bloomberg, May 2019
Via AEI newsletter, May 2019

underlined for me (in the light of the papers I’m reading at the moment about different kinds of science, explanations, and narrative) that economics is a historical science: it can explain what happened, but it can’t make predictions

"Economist Jeffrey Clemens argues, however, in a recent policy paper published by the Cato Institute, that a good deal of this support [for a $15/hour minimum wage] is predicated on an incomplete reading of the academic literature."

"Clemens correctly acknowledges a recent string of important papers — including several co-authored by the economist Arindrajit Dube — that found little evidence that minimum-wage increases reduce employment. But he argues that many other important papers written in the past few years get short shrift by journalists, opinion leaders and policy makers."
Bloomberg  AEI  economics  employment 
may 2019 by pierredv
Economic shocks and clinging - Michael Strain & Stan Veuger, AEI, Jan 2019
Abstract

During his first campaign for president, Barack Obama was criticized when he argued that residents of towns with poor local labor markets “cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren’t like them or anti-immigrant sentiment or anti-trade sentiment as a way to explain their frustration.” We test empirically whether this is the case by examining the effect on social attitudes, as measured in the General Social Survey, of a local labor market’s exposure to import competition brought about by “the China shock,” from 1990 to 2007. We find that the economic effects of globalization do indeed change the attitudes of whites towards immigrants, minorities, religion and guns. More specifically, we find evidence of significant hardening of existing attitudes — that is, the impact of these import shocks appears concentrated in the tails of the distribution over attitudes.
AEI  economics  politics  culture  immigration  gun-control  Trade  globalization  religion 
january 2019 by pierredv
Congress must grow to check the administrative state - AEI Sep 2018
"The rise of the administrative state and the corresponding decline in power of the legislative branch is much lamented, often by political conservatives, and rightly so. The executive branch so dominates policymaking that Congress often stands by as major aspects of public policy get rewritten without any change to underlying law. The country’s founders wanted the people’s representatives in the House and Senate to serve as checks on an overly assertive executive branch. Congress’s persistent failure to properly fulfill this essential constitutional role in recent years is one reason the nation’s politics are out of balance."
AEI  opinion  governance  US  politics 
september 2018 by pierredv
Technology is outsmarting net neutrality - AEI
"Net neutrality is having a Gilda Radner moment. After years of debate, protests, name-calling, and the like, technology is leaving net neutrality behind. Here are at least three indicators that technology is outsmarting net neutrality."

1. 5G will use network slicing, which enables multiple virtual networks on a common physical infrastructure
2. Netflix and other large edge providers are bypassing the internet. More specifically, they are building or leasing their own networks designed to their specific needs and leaving the public internet — the system of networks that only promise best efforts to deliver content — to their lesser rivals.
3. One of its basic premises is that customers should not be restricted in any way regarding the resources they can reach. But apps, by their very nature, violate that premise.
AEI  Mark-Jamison  opinion  NetNeutrality 
september 2017 by pierredv
Looking for the Perfect Gift? Social Science Can Help - AEI
Imagine the look on the kids’ little faces when, instead of putting presents under the tree, you whip out your wallet and give them each a crisp $100 bill. I proposed that once to my wife and she suggested that we should also start a fund to pay for their counseling.
sociology  economics  AEI  humor  Arthur-Brooks 
december 2016 by pierredv
AEI: Trump’s America -- Charles-Murray
If you are dismayed by Trumpism, don’t kid yourself that it will fade away if Donald Trump fails to win the Republican nomination. Trumpism is an expression of the legitimate anger that many Americans feel about the course that the country has taken, and its appearance was predictable. It is the endgame of a process that has been going on for a half-century: America’s divestment of its historic national identity.
Charles-Murray  AEI  US  politics  class  elections 
february 2016 by pierredv
The big short - Peter Wallison, AEI
Counter-narrative to The Big Short: "This is not the kind of story that Hollywood likes—no greed, no evildoers, not even any humor—just very bad government policy combined with serial government blunders. We should see the “greed narrative” for what it is: first, an effort to support the enactment of another bad policy—the job-destroying Dodd-Frank Act—and then to keep it fully in force. The Big Short is entertainment, not the truth."
AEI  finance  borrowing 
january 2016 by pierredv
Apple, Google, and Congress: The smartphone encryption standoff - TechPolicDaily Oct 2014
"Given the harsh reaction of top US government officials to Apple and Google’s announcements that they would install encryption protection in their smart phones, both companies (particularly Apple officials) have reason to feel the sting of Pogo’s famous lament. Their proposed encryptions would allow only users – and no outside individual or public official – to unblock their devices. Departing Attorney General Eric Holder called out (without specifically naming) the two companies, stating that it is “worrisome to see some companies thwarting our ability” to quickly identify and apprehend child sex abusers."
Apple  Google  FBI  NSA  smartphone  encryption  TechPolicyDaily  privacy  security  AEI 
october 2014 by pierredv

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