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pierredv : tim-farrar   3

LEO and MEO broadband constellations mega source of consternation - SpaceNews.com Mar 2018
"the rush to HTS is driving down bandwidth prices so fast that some fairly low-mileage satellites are struggling to keep up."

“At the moment there is a potential scramble for who is going to be the third player between Telesat, LeoSat and SpaceX,” said Farrar. “It’s probably going to be clear in the next 12 months which of those is out ahead.”

"Perhaps the biggest variable in calculating demand is figuring out what consumers will have to pay for the user terminal—the receiver and antennas customers will use to connect to the constellation."

"Farrar is among analysts who doubt consumer broadband will be the biggest application for LEO constellations. Bridging the digital divide is a laudable goal, but backhaul — using satellites to help cellular networks to increase coverage and improve service — is an early market they can dominate with or without cheap antennas."
SpaceNews  NGSO  LEO  MEO  GEO  HTS  broadband  satellite  Tim-Farrar  Armand-Musey  NSR  antennas  Kymeta  Phasor  commerce  trends 
march 2018 by pierredv
Satellite companies propose C-band sharing plan with US mobile operators | PolicyTracker: Feb 2018
“Asked whether moving out of the band will give satellite operators a monetary windfall, [SES chief strategy and development officer] De Hauwer declined to speculate about the size or precise use of any such compensation. However, he said, satellite service providers in space and on the ground have invested billions in the C-band over the decades, and any change to that ecosystem is complex and expensive.”

“If the satellite companies don’t do anything, the FCC might allocate the spectrum under less favourable terms and without any compensation, said Telecom, Media and Finance Associates satellite consultant Tim Farrar. The possibility of receiving billions of dollars for moving out of the band is attractive because the satellite industry isn’t a rapidly growing one and a windfall would be welcome, he said.”

“If the FCC goes along with the SES/Intelsat plan, controversy could flare around who ends up with the 100 MHz of satellite spectrum, Farrar said. He noted in a blog post that wireless operators Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile put forward divergent views on reallocation mechanisms in comments to the regulator’s consultation on expanding flexible use in mid-band spectrum between 3.7 GHz and 24 GHz. Verizon called for a near-term notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) with market-based clearance mechanisms rather than an auction. AT&T asked for “substantial record development, including additional analysis and modeling” before the launch of an NPRM, while T-Mobile said the agency should reject the Intelsat proposal and auction the spectrum.”
PolicyTracker  satellite  C-band  SES  Verizon  AT&T  T-Mobile  Tim-Farrar 
february 2018 by pierredv
CTIA gets it wrong again… - TMF Associates MSS blog
"Not content with disinterring the FCC’s infamous October 2010 working paper that most thought had been completely discredited five years ago, last month CTIA went on to commission Brattle Group to produce a new “updated” version of the FCC’s forecasts. Ironically enough this new report confirms that the FCC was totally wrong in 2010, because the total amount of spectrum in use at the end of 2014 was only 348MHz, not the 822MHz that the FCC projected. Despite this clear demonstration of how ludicrous the original projections were, Brattle reuses the same flawed methodology, which ignores factors such as that new deployment is of cells for capacity not for coverage, and so the ability to support traffic growth is in no way proportional to the total number of cellsites in the US."
TMF-Associates  Tim-Farrar  CTIA  spectrum-crunch  Brattle 
july 2015 by pierredv

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