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Air Force experiment NTS-3 could point the way to the next generation of GPS - SpaceNews.com Mar 2019
"As an immediate response, the Air Force has begun deploying more-advanced GPS satellites, called GPS 3, designed to be more resistant to jamming and spoofing.

The Air Force also is looking for ways to shore up the PNT capabilities provided by GPS. One approach the Air Force believes could work is to supplement its medium Earth orbiting GPS constellation with an additional layer of smaller satellites in geosynchronous Earth orbit.

To test that idea, the Air Force Research Laboratory in 2022 will launch an experimental PNT satellite called NTS-3, short for Navigation Technology Satellite 3."

"As the U.S. military’s first Navigation Technology Satellite mission in 40 years, NTS-3 is intended to test new hardware including a digital signal generator that can be reprogrammed on orbit, enabling operators to quickly deploy new signals as they encounter electronic threats."

"The Air Force still has 31 GPS 2 satellites in service and has only just begun to deploy its GPS 3 constellation. "
SpaceNews  GPS  satellite  USAF  DoD 
march 2019 by pierredv
Space Fence on Kwajalein will allow Air Force to monitor debris, threats - Pacific - Stripes Apr 2017
"The Air Force Space Surveillance System, which shut down in 2013 after 50 years, tracked about 20,000 objects. Space Fence, a tracking system being built by Lockheed Martin on the remote South Pacific island of Kwajalein, is expected to be able to track 200,000."

"Space Fence will be able to detect objects as small as marbles at the roughly 250-mile height of the International Space Station. Such a small speck of debris might sound benign, but NASA has replaced space shuttle windows damaged by flying paint flecks."
space  USAF  orbital-debris  SSA  LockheedMartin  radar 
may 2018 by pierredv
Air Force stakes future on privately funded launch vehicles. Will the gamble pay off? - SpaceNews.com Mar 2018
"The schedule is getting tight for the U.S. Air Force as a 2022 deadline looms to bid farewell to the Atlas 5 and switch to a different rocket that is not powered by a Russian engine."

"... to find alternatives to the United Launch Alliance’s Atlas 5 that uses the Russian RD-180 engine"

"The Air Force signed cost-sharing partnerships with ULA, SpaceX, Orbital ATK and Aerojet Rocketdyne. ... The next step is to select three companies this summer to move forward with enginet [sic] prototypes."

"The selected competitors will face a schedule that seems ambitious even by the standards of commercial space companies."

"A contrarian view comes from the defense industry establishment. Loren Thompson, of the Lexington Institute — a think tank that receives funding from ULA owners Boeing and Lockheed Martin, Aerojet and other defense firms — has called on the Air Force to keep the Atlas 5 and swap the RD-180 engine for Aerojet Rocketdyne’s AR-1 rather than develop a new launch vehicle."
space  launch  USAF  ULA  SpaceX  OrbitalATK  AerojetRocketdyne 
march 2018 by pierredv
Some good news for GPS 3, but trouble looms - SpaceNews.com Dec 2017
"As 2017 winds down, the GPS 3 constellation finally has a string of victories for the Air Force to celebrate. The first satellite is on track for a 2018 launch. The digital navigation payload has been fixed after earlier setbacks, and units are in production. And the ground-control software is starting to recover from years of schedule delays.... But there’s also bad news. Government auditors have warned that the GPS 3 program increasingly is becoming harder to manage because of the complexity and scope of the upgrades required to military weapon systems to receive the encrypted signals. The satellites might be up and running by 2021 but it could take many more years to get the ground infrastructure and equipment terminals in synch with the new satellites."
SpaceNews  GPS  USAF  satellite  navigation 
january 2018 by pierredv
Military could have truly low-cost launch market in five years — if government puts in the effort, experts say - SpaceNews.com May 2017
he U.S. military could have access to a robust, competitive, low-cost launch market within five years with the proper investments, a group of experts said May 8 at an event hosted by the Air Force Association’s Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies.

“We’re at a unique moment in time that overlaps technology, policy, business, and national security,” said Lt. Col. Thomas Schilling, chief of the Commander’s Action Group at the Air Force’s Air University. “When launch is reduced to the point where it’s not a $5 billion program, you can really do some great things…Low-cost reusable launch systems offer the potential for us to do many of the same old missions much faster and at much more affordable price points.”

“Our entire system for licensing and regulating launch is set up for infrequent, expensive occasional launch, launches-per-month,” Miller said. “What we’re looking at is going to launches-per-week and eventually even launches-per-day. And it breaks everything in the regulatory structure.”
DoD  SpaceNews  USAF  NewSpace  launch  Pentagon  regulations  satellite 
november 2017 by pierredv
USAF Wants Authority To Down Drones After F-22 Near Miss | Defense content from Aviation Week
"As drone technology becomes cheaper and more commercially available, the U.S. Air Force is increasingly worried about the threats posed by small UAS such as quadcopters. But while the service is developing the tools to defend against these systems—from jamming their electronics to shooting them down—it lacks the legal authority to use them, says Gen. James Holmes, commander of Air Combat Command."

"Dealing with commercial drones near protected facilities is a complicated legal issue. The FAA is responsible for all U.S. airspace, and has already established no-fly zones over every U.S. military base so any drone flight there is illegal. But determining when it is OK for the military to disable or destroy UAS that wander into its facilities is still something of a gray area. Outside the Pentagon and FAA, multiple government agencies are involved, including the Department of Homeland Security and even the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), which mandates that only government agencies can use jamming against drones."
USAF  drones  UAS  AviationWeek  enforcement  Interference 
july 2017 by pierredv
SpaceX, Blue Origin have opened a “window of opportunity” for US Air Force | Ars Technica
"[Charles] Miller partnered with a number of Air Force officers at Air University and former Air Force officials to study the potential effects of lower-cost access to space on the US military."

"The key concept in the report is “ultra low-cost access to space” enabled by reusable launch vehicle technology. The report says the United States, through developments by SpaceX, Blue Origin, and other companies such as Vulcan Aerospace and Virgin Galactic, has a definitive edge over global competitors in this new area of rocket technology."
ArsTechnica  USAF  satellite  space  launch  NewSpace  SpaceX  BlueOrigin 
may 2017 by pierredv
SWATs, SWEATERs, and ANSWERs: Air Force gets serious about spectrum warfare
"First, the term "spectrum warfare" is evolving quickly well-understood mainstream usage, and second, spectrum warfare rapidly is taking its place as a top U.S. military priority. For the uninitiated, spectrum warfare is an umbrella term that comprises the hitherto separate military disciplines of electronic warfare, cyber warfare, optical warfare, and navigation warfare."
USAF  spectru-warfare  war  cyberwar  navigation  jamming  EW  electronic-warfare 
november 2014 by pierredv
Dynamic Followership: The Prerequisite for Effective Leadership - Article by Lt. Colonel Sharon M. Latour and Lt. Col. Vicki J. Rast
USAF article, focused on mentoring - and leadership, rather than pure followership

Editorial Abstract: Rather than encouraging leaders to mentor followers to "follow me" as an imitation learning imperative, leaders may mentor to specific and objective abilities/traits to create dynamic subordinates. These dynamic follower competencies form a foundation from which follower initiative can grow to leader initiative more naturally. The identified follower competencies help leaders focus their mentoring efforts. This approach encourages followers to develop fully, based on their personalities, strengths and weaknesses, and situational factors.
followership  USAF  management 
august 2009 by pierredv

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