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pierredv : william-webb   11

(46) How useful is network slicing? | Wiilam Webb, LinkedIn, Oct 2019
Via Gabor, Oct 2019

"So is slicing as important as proponents suggest? Until we know what extra charge will apply for higher QoS, how extensive 5G coverage is, and how effective throttling and radio channel reservation can be, then it is hard to tell."
LinkedIn  William-Webb  5G  QoS 
8 days ago by pierredv
Viewpoint: Do we still need spectrum auctions? | PolicyTracker, Jan 10, 2019 by William Webb
"When there is cleared spectrum to award, the default process is now the auction. It has been widely used for some 30 years and is generally agreed to be the least bad way to distribute spectrum when demand exceeds supply. But is this still true?

"Where the entity awarding the spectrum – typically the national regulator – is unsure as to the best distribution of that spectrum among competing companies, then the auction allows the market to make the decision. But what if the answer is obvious – distribute it equally to the existing mobile operators?"

"Equal distribution could be just that – all operators get the same amount. Or it could be weighted by, for example, market share."
PolicyTracker  spectrum-auctions  William-Webb  opinion  spectrum-assignment 
january 2019 by pierredv
[pdf] Why has spectrum sharing been so hard to accomplish? Martin Cave and William Webb, October 2017
" One background feature is that the momentum of spectrum user rights (SURs) (defined as a limit on the interference that can be expected from others in the same and neighbouring bands) as the primary way of controlling interference appears to have faltered. "

“The other lesson we derive from the past five years is that legacy spectrum users, unsurprisingly, continue to bring forward objections to sharing. And why should they not?”

Two market approaches:

“In the first version, a single licensee is allocated full rights of access to all of the spectrum within given geographical and band limits, subject to restrictions on emissions at the boundaries.” (Example: LSA.)

“In the second version, the licensee is assigned an apparatus licence, which does not fully exhaust the potential of the spectrum concerned – for example, not all the spectrum potentially available may be required by the licensee; or it may not be used continuously; or it may not be used in the full geographical area for which it is assigned. In these circumstances, an overlay licence can be issued, which entitles the new licensee to use any spectrum not exploited by the incumbent.” (The Hazlett approach.)

“Nearly a decade later there has been very little shared use of the bands and TVWS is broadly seen as a failure. What went wrong? There were two major factors: uncertainty and delay.”
William-Webb  Martin-Cave  spectrum-sharing 
november 2017 by pierredv
Spectrum sharing won’t happen without strong regulatory push | PolicyTracker: Oct 2017
"The "project of increasing the effectiveness of our use of spectrum by sharing is still not so much in the foothills, but with the foothills still in fairly distant view," Martin Cave and William Webb said in a paper published this month"

"One reason for the lag is that the momentum of spectrum user rights (defined as a limit on the interference that can be expected from others in the same and neighbouring bands) as the primary way of controlling interference “appears to have faltered”. . . . The other lesson derived from the past five years is that legacy commercial and public spectrum users continue to object to sharing"

"Can the market resolve sharing issues? There are potentially two solutions, the authors said. In one, a single licensee is allocated full access rights to all the spectrum within given geographical and band limits, subject to restrictions on emissions at the boundaries. Here, the regulator could simply authorise trading of “sliced and diced” access rights within the licence and collect information from participants in sharing contracts sufficient to enforce the rights of adjacent users outside the sharing arrangements.

"Under a second option, the licensee is assigned an apparatus licence that does not fully exhaust the potential of the spectrum, allowing the issuance of an overlay licence which entitles the licensee to use any spectrum not being used by the incumbent."
PolicyTracker  William-Webb  Martin-Cave  spectrum-sharing 
november 2017 by pierredv
Viewpoint: Is CBRS a help or hindrance in the 5G race? | PolicyTracker: the spectrum management newsletter
"So there is a strong argument that CBRS will actually enable the US to deploy a much higher capacity cellular system, with both frequencies for conventional outdoor deployment and also for excellent in-building coverage. Innovative approaches are likely to emerge to enable roaming between outdoor and indoor systems, load balancing with Wi-Fi and more. The US could end up as a global leader in what seems a much more likely network of the future than any 3.5 GHz outdoor solution."
opinion  William-Webb  CBRS  3.5GHz  5G 
september 2017 by pierredv
Webb hopes 5G book can help provoke mid-course correction — PolicyTracker - Jan 2017
PolicyTracker talks to William Webb, chief executive of the Weightless SIG, about his new book, "The 5G Myth". Webb says he is in a position to be objective about where 5G is going, although he suspects some will find his latest work contentious.
PolicyTracker  William-Webb  5G  hype 
january 2017 by pierredv
Viewpoint: What is wrong with the 5G vision? — PolicyTracker: the spectrum management newsletter
William Webb
"The 5G vision has not been coupled with a business case, nor integrated well with the existing structure of operators and other players in the current communications environment."
William-Webb  PolicyTracker  5G  opinion 
june 2016 by pierredv
Is it time to revise ITU categories? - PolicyTracker Feb 2016
"The ITU classifies spectrum bands as "mobile," "fixed," "broadcast" and so on. But as the boundaries between these categories blur, bands should be differentiated by the interference levels they generate, not their uses, argue Martin Cave and William Webb. Some believe that while this is a sensible idea, it may prove impractical." "Reclassifying every band would "be a pretty major change to bring about," Webb said. But the ITU could start by declaring both broadcast and mobile high power uses and replacing certain categories with specific power levels." ITU Radiocommunication Bureau Director François Rancy: "Categorising allocations by the amount of interference "raises a fundamental difficulty in that interference levels result from the characteristics of both the interfering and the interfered stations," he added. What may result in high interference in one case may be low in another."
ITU  regulation  interference  PolicyTracker  William-Webb  SURs 
february 2016 by pierredv
Book review: "Spectrum Management" by Martin Cave and William Webb - PolicyTracker Feb 2016
"Two strong advocates of spectrum liberalisation recognise practical difficulties, lament the lack of innovation in Europe and make the case for reform of the ITU Radio Regulations." Their five key recommendations : "1. Replace exclusive licences with less restrictive alternatives to facilitate spectrum sharing 2. Base licences on interference generated rather than power transmitted, like the Spectrum Usage Rights promoted by UK regulator Ofcom 3. Improve receiver performance because insufficiently robust devices, like TV sets, restrict the usage of neighbouring frequencies 4. Reform the category system used by the ITU 5. Reconsider the work of regional and global spectrum bodies"
books  Martin-Cave  William-Webb  spectrum  PolicyTracker 
february 2016 by pierredv
Has white space access come of age?
"Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA) is a concept whose time has come, according to a new e-book by William Webb, CEO of the Weightless Special Interest Group." "Under the Ofcom rules, a WSD could reduce its power level to operate safely in channels where full power would not be allowed. This more flexible approach has a profound effect on white space availability, Webb explains..." “Time has shown that the Ofcom approach is quite difficult to implement,” Webb told PolicyTracker. As a result, he believes it would be pragmatic for regulators beginning on white space regulation to follow the simpler US approach initially." "According to Webb, a better approach would be to allow higher levels of access at first, with device power levels revised downwards if interference occurs. "
William-Webb  spectrum  whitespace  FCC  PolicyTracker  rules  Ofcom  ebooks 
october 2013 by pierredv

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