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pierredv : belief   9

Most atheists believe in the supernatural, despite trusting science - New Scientist isssue 3233, 8 June 2019
"The UK-based Understanding Unbelief project interviewed thousands of self-identified atheists and agnostics from six countries – Brazil, China, Denmark, Japan, US and UK. It found that despite their godlessness, a majority believe in at least one supernatural phenomenon or entity."

pdf: https://research.kent.ac.uk/understandingunbelief/wp-content/uploads/sites/45/2019/05/UUReportRome.pdf

" Marjaana Lindeman of the University of Helsinki, Finland, says she is surprised by the findings. Her own work on supernatural beliefs finds that a majority of atheists reject them all."
NewScientist  belief  religion  psychology" 
29 days ago by pierredv
Survey: Supernatural Experiences Common Among America's Religious
"Among the most common religious and mystical experiences reported by Americans include protection from harm by a guardian angel (55 percent); calling by God to do something (44 percent); witnessing a miraculous, physical healing (23 percent); and hearing the voice of God (20 percent), according to the second part of the Baylor Religion Survey."
"A total of 1,648 randomly selected adults nationwide were asked to answer more than 350 items in the survey designed by the Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR) and conducted by the Gallup organizationin the fall of 2007."
religion  surveys  polls  psychology  belief 
4 weeks ago by pierredv
Modernity’s Spell - The New Atlantis, Clare Coffey, Winter 2019
Review of "Credulity: A Cultural History of US Mesmerism " by Emily Ogden

"Whatever beliefs the mesmerist professed, on the mesmeric stage his craft depended on performing the technique of mesmerism with seriousness and intent. With subjects selected for their predisposition to belief, mesmerist and subject constituted what Daniel O’Keefe, in Stolen Lightning: The Social Theory of Magic (1982), calls an “act-as-if group”: a social interaction that temporarily redraws the accepted borders of reality by mutual agreement.

O’Keefe believes that the act-as-if groups are the basis for magic. Mutual agreement overvalues a temporary subjective state, giving it new meaning, creating a framework around it. The agreement then allows the subjective state to be sustained. So, by Ogden’s account, you have an odd tension. By one light, the mesmerists who identified imagination as the active agent stand for greater enlightenment than those who believed in the non-existent magnetic fluid. And yet their attempts to control imagination in others hinged on encouraging and ritualizing false beliefs — exactly what some sociologists say magicians do."

"Ogden describes the process by which the debunking of mesmerism produced successor generations in terms of the “idol function” played by false beliefs. The destruction of an idol, the thinking goes, is not a closed and final process. When you destroy an idol, you must supply some account of the undeniable effect the idol had on the lives of its followers. Christians hewing down a tree sacred to the pagans, for example, might say that the boons received by worshippers of the tree were really the gifts of demons. In exploding the existence of animal magnetism — ostensibly a physical substance producing foreseeable effects — the debunkers imbued their subjects with much more powerful, protean, and elusive forces: credulity, credenciveness, imagination."

"Ogden’s animating insight — that irrational beliefs, at least in others, help one to build up a rational self — is probably true as individual psychology, unprovable as a universal law, and extremely plausible as a process of secularism in particular."

"Identifying primitive belief and calling it “enchantment” — the term for that state of the world before modernity when one is in awe but in error, like Max Weber’s propitiating savage — is a defining aspect of modern secular culture. Enchantment is a periodizing word, that is: The world used to be enchanted, and now it is not. In this way, enchantment and modernity are not opposing forces but belong together."
TheNewAtlantis  books  reviews  history  culture  magic  belief 
may 2019 by pierredv
Why God Will Not Die - Jack Miles, The Atlantic, 17 Nov 2014
"In my 20s, I was a sucker for such stuff. Worse, I was painfully slow to notice my own posing. Only after the passage of some time and the small, salutary shock of having my wallet stolen did I examine these three professions of secular faith and realize, with an inward blush, that what I had wanted was simply closure, a way to stop thinking about questions whose answers were beyond my reach." - "Science keeps revealing how much we don't, perhaps can't, know. Yet humans seek closure, which should make religious pluralists of us all." - "Ignorance was a great human breakthrough, perhaps the greatest of all, for until our prehistoric but anatomically modern ancestors could tell the difference between ignorance and knowledge, how could they know they knew anything? "
philosophy  religion  belief  god  essays  **  theAtlantic  ignorance 
march 2015 by pierredv
Belief in God Boils Down to a Gut Feeling - Yahoo! News
Intuitive (vs. reasoning) people more likely to believe in god
religion  belief  via:JohnHelm 
october 2011 by pierredv
The Evolution Polling Numbers Have *Nudged* A Little | The Intersection | Discover Magazine
" it’s starting to look like there’s some slight movement. The young Earthers are now at just 40 %; they’d been as high as 47 % at various points in the 1990s. Meanwhile, the non-guided evolution camp has gone up to 16 % (from as low as 9 % in the 1990s)"
evolution  belief  religion  polling  Gallup  via:gmsv 
december 2010 by pierredv
Einstein's sceptics: Who were the relativity deniers? - physics-math - 18 November 2010 - New Scientist
analysis of motives of relativity deniers, by Milena Wazeck Notable that " it was easy for Einstein's opponents to see themselves as victims rather than aggressors." Reasons for "ramshackle alliance" = opponents found themselves outsiders = concerned about future of science - should be comprehensible = unsettled period in Germany: "In a world of uncertainties, some felt science at least should be relied upon to provide firm ground." "Einstein's opponents were seriously concerned about the future of science. They did not simply disagree with the theory of general relativity; they opposed the new foundations of physics altogether. The increasingly mathematical approach of theoretical physics collided with the then widely held view that science is essentially simple mechanics, comprehensible to every educated layperson."
science  history  belief  NewScientist  ***  skepticism 
november 2010 by pierredv
Epiphenom: The hypnotic power of charismatic religion
"Just telling a pentecostalists that someone has healing powers makes them think that they are highly charismatic. What's more, they didn't feel God's presence in the prayers read by the person they were told was a non-Christian."
belief  religion  psychology  experiment 
april 2010 by pierredv

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