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pierredv : rural   7

US Huawei Ban Threatens Internet Access in Rural Areas, Some Providers May Fold - CircleID, May 2019
"The upcoming ban on U.S. telecommunications networks acquiring or using equipment from Chinese suppliers under a cloud of uncertainty, with some fearing bankruptcy. Rural broadband carriers could be forced to rip out and replace entire networks because they wouldn't be able to import spare parts or software updates to maintain infrastructure, Roger Entner, a telecom analyst at Recon Analytics told LA Times."
Huawei  CircleID  rural  broadband 
may 2019 by pierredv
Taking Risks to Stimulate Backhaul Demand - NSR May 2019
"Assuming a BTS 20 km away from the closest backbone node and satellite capacity pricing at $300 USD/Mbps/month, satellite is the most cost-effective solution if the station consumes under 600 GB/month. To add a bit of context, the average plan in Sub-Saharan Africa consumes 0.6 GB/month, so a new station supporting less than 1,000 subscribers would be most cost-effectively backhauled via satellite."

"When a satellite actor pitches a rural deployment to an MNO, aversion to change is one of the biggest barriers. For the commercial department, an additional site in a rural location might not move the needle for their sales targets, and most of their efforts are centered on marketing for urban areas. Similarly, the operations department usually likes to work with standardized products that do not add complexity to managing their network."
NSR  backhaul  broadband  business  rural  business-models 
may 2019 by pierredv
Will Satellite Operators Become (Rural) Mobile Operators? - NSR, Feb 2019
"Connecting the “other 3 billion” is a recurring motto for the satcom Industry. Unfortunately, the reality is that the impact on mitigating the digital divide is still modest. Mobile is the de facto way of getting online for “the bottom of the pyramid” but here, satellite can still find enormous opportunities by complementing the gaps of terrestrial networks. Given this trend, are Wi-Fi hotspots over satellite the key way for satcom to bring the unconnected online?"

"Numerous actors in the satcom space are launching Wi-Fi hotspot offers to serve the low-end segments of the market. The addressable market for these kinds of solutions is massive given the billions living in underserved areas. According to NSR’s VSAT and Broadband Markets, 17th Edition report, Wi-Fi hotspot annual service revenues will reach $7.5 billion by 2027, representing 43% of total satellite consumer broadband revenues."

"With HTS becoming the norm, satellite broadband offers can now meet UN Broadband Commission affordability targets of 1 GB of data for less than 2% of the monthly GNI per capita"

"Today, a satellite terminal that supports double-digit Mbps with 10s of concurrent sessions combined with a Wi-Fi smallcell is below the $1,000 USD threshold, which is within the reach of local businesses."

"Selecting the right locations to set up the Wi-Fi hotspot is not trivial. It needs a reliable local microentrepreneur with appropriate technical skills to maintain the equipment and run the network. The village must be big enough with adequate disposable income to generate demand but not too large that it will shortly be targeted by terrestrial alternatives. In the same line, the hotspot should be far enough from terrestrial alternatives to avoid being cannibalized by terrestrial solutions, but penetration of mobile devices is crucial to ensure customers can access the network."
NSR  satellite  rural  Wi-Fi  hotspots  broadband  HTS 
february 2019 by pierredv
The evolving role of satellite networks in rural and remote broadband access - Papers - OECD iLibrary
David Reed's work

"Satellites serve as an important option to deliver broadband services to residences and businesses in rural and remote regions throughout the world. In OECD countries, the majority of people live in urban areas or at locations that are closely settled enough to use other broadband access technologies on a cost effective basis. Satellite technology, however, is deploying several significant innovations that result in improved services and may radically change the costs of providing satellite broadband. The purpose of this report is to describe these key recent developments based upon new and anticipated satellite broadband deployments, and discuss their implications for the future use of satellites to deliver broadband services to residential and business users. The report investigates how innovation is changing the role of satellites in extending broadband services to underserved areas in relation to other broadband options and important policy challenges to be considered in light of such innovation."
OECD  broadband  satellite  rural 
february 2018 by pierredv
Video: LTE In Rural America Summit
"In September 2011, Verizon Wireless hosted the first annual LTE In Rural America Summit to bring together rural communications companies to discuss how to build and operate a 4G LTE network in their areas using the tower and backhaul assets of the rural company and Verizon Wireless’ core 4G LTE equipment and premium 700 MHz spectrum. To date, 12 rural companies have announced their participation in the LTE in Rural America program and many others are in active negotiations with Verizon Wireless. The 12 rural companies have leased spectrum covering, in total, more than 2.6 million people in rural communities and nearly 82,000 square miles in Kentucky, Oklahoma, Michigan, Wisconsin, Utah, North Carolina, Indiana, Idaho and Missouri. "
Verizon  cellular  LTE  via:LinkHoewing  rural 
november 2011 by pierredv

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