recentpopularlog in

pierredv : trust   9

How Tech Utopia Fostered Tyranny - The New Atlantis -Winter 2019
"Authoritarians’ love for digital technology is no fluke — it’s a product of Silicon Valley’s “smart” paternalism"

"ools based on the premise that access to information will only enlighten us and social connectivity will only make us more humane have instead fanned conspiracy theories, information bubbles, and social fracture. A tech movement spurred by visions of libertarian empowerment and progressive uplift has instead fanned a global resurgence of populism and authoritarianism."

"But what we are searching for — what we desire — is often shaped by what we are exposed to and what we believe others desire. And so predicting what is useful, however value-neutral this may sound, can shade into deciding what is useful, both to individual users and to groups, and thereby shaping what kinds of people we become, for both better and worse."

"As long as our desires are unsettled and malleable — as long as we are human — the engineering choices of Google and the rest must be as much acts of persuasion as of prediction."

"Each company was founded on a variation of the premise that providing more people with more information and better tools, and helping them connect with each other, would help them lead better, freer, richer lives."

"Moreover, because algorithms are subject to strategic manipulation and because they are attempting to provide results unique to you, the choices shaping these powerful defaults are necessarily hidden away by platforms demanding you simply trust them"

"We can see the shift from “access to tools” to algorithmic utopianism in the unheralded, inexorable replacement of the “page” by the “feed.” "

"By consuming what the algorithm says I want, I trust the algorithm to make me ever more who it thinks I already am."

"What’s shocking isn’t that technological development is a two-edged sword. It’s that the power of these technologies is paired with a stunning apathy among their creators about who might use them and how. Google employees have recently declared that helping the Pentagon with a military AI program is a bridge too far, convincing the company to cancel a $10 billion contract. But at the same time, Google, Apple, and Microsoft, committed to the ideals of open-source software and collaboration toward technological progress, have published machine-learning tools for anyone to use, including agents provocateur and revenge pornographers."

"They and their successors, based on optimistic assumptions about human nature, built machines to maximize those naturally good human desires. But, to use a line from Bruno Latour, “technology is society made durable.” That is, to extend Latour’s point, technology stabilizes in concrete form what societies already find desirable."
politics  surveillance  technology  TheNewAtlantis  Google  Facebook  AI  prediction  ethics  morality  search  trust  behavior 
april 2019 by pierredv
In Way Too Little We Trust - Adam Garfinkle, The American Interest, Dec 2017
Via Pierre-Yves Saintoyant

"The essence of all this is that people who share common mazeways from having lived together and been socialized generation to generation can anticipate what others are up to, and the result is a network or web of reciprocal shared expectations."

"The ballast provided by social trust enables a relatively light-handed government to do for a collection of communities in a larger country only what they cannot readily do for themselves."

"... seven factors [my numbering]— [1] immigration-driven heterogeneity, [2] the decline of traditional religious mores and related informal norms, [3] technology-driven isolation, [4] the backwash of institutional dysfunction and elite dethronement, [5] the media-driven “mean world syndrome,” [6] family instability and breakdown, and [7] the excessive intrusiveness of the state"

"This suggests that, however the problem arose, the decline of social trust has taken on a downward-spiraling life of its own, generating not only a compounding lack of trust but also an ambient pessimism about the future. So we have not just a problem, but a problem set defined by these seven causal elements."

"If we are driven nearly berserk politically by current levels of labor displacement—and we are—we will clearly enter the domain of full-frontal social unsustainability if the challenge more than quadruples in a single generation. And yet at present there is absolutely zero prospect that the American political class will do anything about this. Some people are terrified about what a rising deficit could mean, but compared to the existential threat to social order posed by an automation-driven political economy derangement of this magnitude, the deficit problem, serious as it is, seems like no more than a bad hangnail."
TheAmericanInterest  trust  Society  politics  US 
december 2018 by pierredv
Blockchain is not only crappy technology but a bad vision for the future
So in summary, here’s what blockchain-the-technology is: “Let’s create a very long sequence of small files — each one containing a hash of the previous file, some new data, and the answer to a difficult math problem — and divide up some money every hour among anyone willing to certify and store those files for us on their computers.”

Now, here’s what blockchain-the-metaphor is: “What if everyone keeps their records in a tamper-proof repository not owned by anyone?”



People treat blockchain as a “futuristic integrity wand”—wave a blockchain at the problem, and suddenly your data will be valid. For almost anything people want to be valid, blockchain has been proposed as a solution. It’s true that tampering with data stored on a blockchain is hard, but it’s false that blockchain is a good way to create data that has integrity.



Blockchain systems are supposed to be more trustworthy, but in fact they are the least trustworthy systems in the world.
Medium  bitcoin  blockchain  trust  critique 
may 2018 by pierredv
Who can you trust? How tech is reshaping what we believe | New Scientist
"The more trust in a society, the better it fares. Put another way: without trust, society would collapse. But something strange is happening. Public trust in our institutions has plummeted in the past decade. Nearly half of people in the US mistrust lawmakers, according to a poll carried out in June. In the UK, fewer than 1 in 4 people trust the press. And yet we are putting more trust than ever before in people we meet on the internet."

“Trust is the bridge between the known and the unknown,” says Rachel Botsman at the University of Oxford’s Said Business School.

"Of course distrust in big institutions predates the internet, but technology has made it an international sport. It is easier than ever before for leaks to become common knowledge. And there are many more sources now. Opinion is no longer shaped only by journalists, experts or state authorities. With constant access to a deluge of information, rather than putting our trust in the institutions our peers also trust, as we once did, we’re now trusting our peers instead of those institutions."

"In fact, many of these companies have come to realise that trust itself is their product.

"Hawking trust between individuals requires some sleight of hand: we are more likely to trust people at a distance when they are backed up by trustworthy organisations. We trust strangers on Airbnb far more than strangers on a marketplace such as Craigslist, for instance."

"A major concern is that we will become overly dependent on digital platforms to manage trust for us. “People trust people, not institutions,” Zuckerberg recently said. That is misleading. We trust people online because of the institutions – Facebook included – that make it possible."
quotes  NewScientist  trust  psychology  Facebook  TaskRabbit  Airbnb  business 
december 2017 by pierredv
Mind games: How con artists get the better of you - New Scientist Jan 2016
"If not simply a pathological liar, who then is the con artist? Con artists often possess some or all of the so-called dark triad of personality traits: psychopathy, Machiavellianism and narcissism. "
"People are trusting by nature, and that may be a good thing overall. Studies show that having higher so-called generalised trust – a willingness to generally assume the best in others – comes with better physical health and greater emotional happiness. Countries with higher levels of trust tend to grow faster economically. And the smarter you are, the more you are likely to trust: a 2014 study found a strong positive relationship between trust, intelligence, health and happiness.

As well as making us feel better, a blindness to deception can help us perform better too. "
"Zajonc called it the “mere exposure effect”: familiarity breeds affection. It applies to people, too. In one study, seeing someone once, however briefly, even with no further interaction, made people more likely to agree to something this person later asked of them."
personality  fraud  crime  psychology  deception  dark-triad  trust 
april 2016 by pierredv
Promoting Spectrum Sharing In the Wireless Broadband Era - NTIA blog Jan 2015
"If spectrum sharing is to become reality, though, we need to build trust on multiple levels. . . " in dynamic sharing technology, between public and private sectors, in rules that ensure everyone plays by the rules
NTIA  spectrum-sharing  trust  wireless 
january 2015 by pierredv
A Speculative Post on the Idea of Algorithmic Authority « Clay Shirky
"people trust new classes of aggregators and filters, whether Google or Twitter or Wikipedia (in its ‘breaking news’ mode.) "
via Ellen Goodman comment at Silicon Flatirons conf Jan 2010
shirky  authority  trust  crowdsourcing 
january 2010 by pierredv
The future of the SEC | Growing insecurities | The Economist
Ostensibly about change at the SEC, I'm most interested by the discussion of the role of trust, and the principles- vs. rules-based cultures at the CFTC and SEC, respectively. "WHEN Christopher Cox took over the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in June 2005, George Bush praised him as “a champion of the free-enterprise system” who understood that it was “built on trust”. These days unfettered capitalism is under siege and trust is in short supply—not least trust in the SEC itself." Part of the problem is that securities regulation is shared between the CFTC and SEC. The article argues that merging "would require a doctrinal ruling, since the CFTC’s approach is far more principles-based than that of the SEC, which cleaves to hard rules."
regulation  finance  economist  trust 
january 2009 by pierredv

Copy this bookmark:





to read