recentpopularlog in

pierredv : x:wsj   56

Video - Drone Use Takes Off on the Home Front - WSJ.com April 2012
Dozens of universities and law-enforcement agencies have been given approval by federal aviation regulators to use unmanned aircraft known as drones. Jennifer Valentino-DeVries reports on digits
video  x:wsj  drones  UAV 
april 2012 by pierredv
Drones Are Techies' New Darlings - WSJ.com
"Thanks to a proliferation of inexpensive sensors, chips, cameras and other gizmos that can be tacked onto wannabe spy planes and helicopters, it's easier than ever for technologists to build craft that fly themselves."
drones  UAV  x:wsj  surveillance  interference  video 
april 2012 by pierredv
Robert McDowell: The U.N. Threat to Internet Freedom - WSJ.com Feb 2012
Tag: "Top-down, international regulation is antithetical to the Net, which has flourished under its current governance model. "
internet  governance  multi-stakeholder  opinion  x:wsj 
february 2012 by pierredv
No More Angling for the Best Seat; More Meetings Are Stand-Up Jobs - WSJ.com Feb 2012
"Stand-up meetings are part of a fast-moving tech culture in which sitting has become synonymous with sloth."
work  culture  meetings  x:wsj 
february 2012 by pierredv
Bassam Alghanim's Email-Hacking Allegations Against His Brother, Kutayba, Exposes Hackers-For-Hire Trade - WSJ.com Jan 2012
"One such site, hiretohack.net, advertises online services including being able to "crack" passwords for major email services in less than 48 hours. It says it charges a minimum of $150, depending on the email provider, the password's complexity and the urgency of the job. The site describes itself as a group of technology students based in Europe, U.S. and Asia. "
cybersecurity  hacking  x:wsj 
january 2012 by pierredv
Ann Marlowe: The Truth About Who Fights for Us - WSJ.com
The US military, particularly the Army, is NOT poor and black "In 2008, using data provided by the Defense Department, the Heritage Foundation found that only 11% of enlisted military recruits in 2007 came from the poorest one-fifth, or quintile, of American neighborhoods (as of the 2000 Census), while 25% came from the wealthiest quintile. Heritage reported that "these trends are even more pronounced in the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program, in which 40% of enrollees come from the wealthiest neighborhoods, a number that has increased substantially over the past four years.""
trends  USA  poverty  x:wsj  race  military 
october 2011 by pierredv
Coming to a Gadget Near You: A Movie for All Your Screens - WSJ.com UltraViolet Oct 2011
"a consortium of large Hollywood studios, gadget makers and retailers launched a cloud-based service that lets people watch online or mobile versions of the movies they bought on DVD or Blu-ray. This free "digital locker" keeps track of movie purchases and gets copies of them onto laptops, smartphones and more. "
x:wsj  media  commerce 
october 2011 by pierredv
A Sleep Battle of the Sexes - WSJ.com
"Women tend to have more deep sleep and awaken fewer times during the night than men do. They also weather some of the effects of a lack of sleep better than men, according to recent studies. Still, men overall say they are more satisfied with the amount and quality of their shut-eye than are women. "
sleep  health  x:wsj 
august 2011 by pierredv
For Many Seniors, There May Be No Retirement - WSJ.com Aug 11
"ore than three in five U.S. workers in their 50s and 60s plan on working past 65 -- and 47% of that group say they'll do so because they'll need the money or health benefits"
ageing  retirement  x:wsj  usa  factoids 
august 2011 by pierredv
No Easy Answer on Income-Tax Issue - WSJ.com
"Most working Americans do pay Social Security and Medicare payroll taxes. But because of tax breaks for seniors and inducements for work and raising children, among other accumulated changes to the tax code, many manage to avoid income taxes altogether. The nonpartisan Tax Policy Center in July pegged that number at 46% of U.S. households for this year."
taxes  x:wsj  USA 
august 2011 by pierredv
'Superjobs': Why You Work More, Enjoy It Less - WSJ.com
Quote: Management consultant Rich Moran, whose clients have included Apple and AT&T, says employees will do whatever it takes to help their company compete: "Job descriptions are written in sand, and the wind is blowing."
employment  work  x:wsj 
may 2011 by pierredv
The Online World of Female Desire - WSJ.com
"Whereas two-minute video clips are the most popular form of contemporary erotica for men, the most popular form for women remains the romance novel, an artifact that takes many hours to digest"
"Like pornography, the romance novel has established a strong presence in the digital domain. It is the primary engine behind the electronic book boom. Currently, three of the top 10 books on Kindle are e-romances."
gender  sex  erotica  x:wsj  ** 
may 2011 by pierredv
Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior - WSJ.com
Wonderfully opinionated piece about immigrant parenting, taking on stereotypes and having fun with them
"What Chinese parents understand is that nothing is fun until you're good at it"
family  culture  china  opinion  learning  x:wsj  *** 
january 2011 by pierredv
Watch Out for ATM Skimming - WSJ.com
"Theft from ATM skimming is approaching $1 billion annually, according to Bankrate.com. Javelin estimates that one in five people have been hit by an ATM skimmer."
security  banking  fraud  x:wsj 
october 2010 by pierredv
Personal Details Exposed Via Biggest U.S. Websites - WSJ.com
"In an effort to quantify the reach and sophistication of the tracking industry, the Journal examined the 50 most popular websites in the U.S. to measure the quantity and capabilities of the "cookies," "beacons" and other trackers installed on a visitor's computer by each site. Together, the 50 sites account for roughly 40% of U.S. page-views."
privacy  x:wsj 
july 2010 by pierredv
Does Language Influence Culture? - WSJ.com, Lera Boroditsky
"a flurry of new cognitive science research is showing that in fact, language does profoundly influence how we see the world"
cognition  perception  x:wsj  **  language 
july 2010 by pierredv
Yukking It Up at the Fed - Real Time Economics - WSJ
laugh lines from Federal Open Market Committee meetings in 2004
finance  government  humor  x:wsj 
may 2010 by pierredv
The New $100 Bill and the War Against Counterfeit Money - WSJ.com
Why dollar bills are green: "But a proliferation of photographic counterfeits prompted the creation of new colorful inks, including the invention in 1857 of a new kind of green ink that used chromium trioxide. The delicate green lines printed in this ink could not be replicated with the black-and-white photography of the day; it would appear as a black mass when photographed"
money  x:wsj  invention  color  counterfeiting  history 
april 2010 by pierredv
Bill Gates Revamps His Polio-Eradication Effort Amid Africa Outbreak - WSJ.com
"disease-specific wars can succeed only if they also strengthen the overall health system in poor countries"
The "horizontal" vs. "vertical" debate
development-assistance  health  philanthropy  x:wsj 
april 2010 by pierredv
Why Many Investors Keep Fooling Themselves (WSJ)
"So, in order to earn 6% for clients after inflation, fees and taxes, these financial planners will somehow have to pick investments that generate 11% or 13% a year before costs. Where will they find such huge gains? Since 1926, according to Ibbotson Associates, U.S. stocks have earned an annual average of 9.8%. Their long-term, net-net-net return is under 4%."

the bottom line: "All this suggests a useful reality check. If your financial planner says he can earn you 6% annually, net-net-net, tell him you'll take it, right now, upfront. In fact, tell him you'll take 5% and he can keep the difference. In exchange, you will sell him your entire portfolio at its current market value. You've just offered him the functional equivalent of what Wall Street calls a total-return swap.

Unless he's a fool or a crook, he probably will decline your offer. If he's honest, he should admit that he can't get sufficient returns to honor the swap. "
investing  finance  psychology  delusion  x:wsj 
january 2010 by pierredv
Google's Nexus Name Irks Estate of Author Philip K. Dick - WSJ.com
"A character in a book does not automatically get trademark protection," Mr. Reiner said.
trademark  google  x:wsj 
january 2010 by pierredv
Google and India Test the Limits of Liberty - WSJ.com
The rules of political speech on the Internet are usually pretty simple. In America, almost anything goes. In places like China, the censors call the shots. But in India -- a boisterous democracy that's riven by religious and ethnic tension -- the game is far trickier, as Google is discovering.
internet  censorship  google  x:wsj  india 
january 2010 by pierredv
Insurgents Hack U.S. Drones - WSJ.com
Militants in Iraq have used $26 off-the-shelf software to intercept live video feeds from U.S. Predator drones, potentially providing them with information they need to evade or monitor U.S. military operations
war  hacking  x:wsj  iraq 
december 2009 by pierredv
Business Fumes Over Carbon Dioxide Rule - WSJ.com
At the heart of the fight over whether U.S. emission constraints should come from the EPA or Congress is a high-stakes issue: which industries will have to foot the bill for a climate cleanup.
x:wsj  climate  commerce  policy 
december 2009 by pierredv
Good Data and Flawed Conclusions - WSJ.com
"'Simpson's Paradox reveals that aggregated data can appear to reverse important trends in the numbers being combined"
An excellent piece of reporting. Starting with a seeming anomaly in the unemployment numbers, Cari Tuna builds a story that ties together anomalies in college admission data, surgical outcomes and baseball batting averages. It boils down to Simpson's Paradox, which explains how aggregated data can appear to reverse important trends in the numbers being combined. (Clue: weighted averages.) If you're a visual learner, skip to the graph at the bottom of the story.
statistics  economics  illusions  fallacies  x:wsj  *** 
december 2009 by pierredv
After Communism's Collapse, a New Rival Emerges - WSJ.com
Capitalist autocracies as an alternative to democracy: the pros and cons of the claim.
politics  geopolitics  x:wsj  *** 
october 2009 by pierredv
To Save Its Dying Tongue, Indonesian Isle Orders Out for Korean - WSJ.com
quote: The Hangeul push on Buton has roots in the work of Lee Hyun-bok, a distinguished linguist now retired from his post at Seoul National University, who has created an international phonetic alphabet based on Hangeul. His alphabet has more than 80 letters, compared with the 24 used today to write Korean, and is designed to cover nearly every human speech sound. Hangeul -- which has similar symbols for related sounds and letters that mimic the shape of the mouth when they are spoken -- "was created all at once as a complete system," Mr. Lee said. "It's very logical."
language  korea  x:wsj 
september 2009 by pierredv
Good Novels Don’t Have to Be Hard Work - WSJ.com - Lev Grossman
Making peace with plot
"A good story is a dirty secret that we all share ... It's not easy to put your finger on what exactly is so disgraceful about our attachment to storyline ... There was once a reason for turning away from plot, but that rationale has outlived its usefulness ... The novel is finally waking up from its 100-year carbonite nap."
x:wsj  books  writing  criticism  story 
august 2009 by pierredv
Airlines' Expert on Missing Bags Fights Lost Cause - WSJ.com
"Last year, more than 31 million bags -- around 1.4% of all checked luggage -- arrived late, industry officials say. Roughly 1.8 million bags never arrived. Some take unexplained detours."
factoids  travel  airlines  x:wsj 
august 2009 by pierredv
Congress Approves Broadband to Nowhere - WSJ.com 1 Feb 09
"The result was a relatively paltry $6 billion for broadband in the House bill and $9 billion in the Senate, with each bill micromanaging the spending differently. The bills include different standards, speeds and other requirements for providers that would use the public funds."
broadband  internet  opinion  x:wsj 
february 2009 by pierredv
A Layoff in the Smith Family Ripples Through Town - WSJ.com
Fascinating case study of the chain of consumer spending, and how a recession gathers momentum. I'm predisposed to see this, of course, but I was struck how much of the spending was on luxury.
people  stories  ***  x:wsj 
january 2009 by pierredv

Copy this bookmark:





to read