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Watch as three friends attempt to recreate Apple's macOS Catalina wallpaper | iMore
The results are spectacular!
Three friends have released their attempt to recreate Apple's macOS Catalina wallpaper.
The trio had previously recreated other macOS wallpapers during a road trip.
The latest attempt is absolutely stunning.
YouTuber Andrew Levitt and two friends, Jacob Phillips and Taylor Gray have teamed up in their latest attempt to recreate Apple's default macOS wallpapers, this time taking a stab at the iconic shot of Catalina island from macOS Catalina.
The trio previously took a road trip from Death Valley National Park, visiting Mojave, Sierra, High Sierra, El Capitan, Yosemite and Mavericks to try and recreate Apple's default macOS wallpapers in previous iterations of the software.
In Levitt's latest video, the three head to Catalina island, backpacking/hiking across the most remote part of the island to try and get a drone shot from the same angle.
The video (below) documents their journey to Catalina island by boat on the Catalina Express. The group walked 7 and a half miles to their campsite on their first day. They then headed to the remote end of the island, before grabbing the shot and hiking back in the dark, where they were stopped by police and told that hiking across the island at night was actually illegal. Fortunately, the police offered to escort them back across the island. Check it out!
mac  macOS  photography  video  wallpaper 
6 hours ago by rgl7194
These Photographers Reshot Apple's macOS Catalina Wallpaper in Real Life
Following up on their popular video from a couple of months ago, YouTuber Andrew Levitt, videographer Jacob Phillips, and photographer Taylor Gray recently set out to re-create Apple’s macOS Catalina wallpaper. They hiked many miles, had to contend with crazy winds, and had a run-in with the police… but darn it, they got the shot!
This trip—the whole project, really—was inspired by the fact that all of Apple’s macOS recent wallpapers were shot within a few hours drive of Levitt’s home in California. And after successfully recreating the Mojave, Sierra, High Sierra, El Capitan, and Yosemite wallpapers in their first video, they set out to Catalina Island to see if they could capture the aerial shot that many of our readers are no doubt still sporting on their Macs today.
mac  macOS  photography  video  wallpaper 
6 hours ago by rgl7194
NoiseBuddy: Control Noise Cancellation and Transparency Modes of AirPods Pro on a Mac - MacStories
Earlier this week, Guilherme Rambo released a new Mac utility called NoiseBuddy that toggles between the noise cancellation and Transparency modes of AirPods Pro and the Beats Solo Pro headphones when they’re connected to a Mac. The app can place an icon in your Mac’s menu bar or on the Touch Bar and uses the same noise cancellation and Transparency iconography found in Control Center on iOS and iPadOS. The app’s settings allow you to run NoiseBuddy in the menu bar, on the Touch Bar, or in both places. To switch modes, simply click the icon in the menu bar or tap the Touch Bar button.
This isn’t Rambo’s first time working with Bluetooth headphones and the Mac. He also created AirBuddy, which we covered previously. AirBuddy is a Mac utility that displays the charge status of AirPods and Beats headphones that use Apple’s proprietary wireless chips. The app also allows users to connect those headphones to their Macs via Bluetooth with a single click.
NoiseBuddy is the kind of Mac utility that I love. It takes overly fiddly aspect of interacting with macOS and makes it dead simple. The free app is available from Rambo’s GitHub repo, where it can be downloaded as a ZIP archive and then dragged into your Applications folder.
airpods_pro  mac  utilities  free 
7 hours ago by rgl7194
Spotlight on Bluetooth: What it is and how we got this version of wireless tech in 2019
iMore, Android Central, and Windows Central have collaborated on a series of fascinating and funny articles that explain the tech, dive into the history, and air the dirty laundry of what we take for granted today in Bluetooth.
If you'd have asked me 15 years ago what Bluetooth is, I may have been able to vaguely mention something about transmitting stuff (because I probably wouldn't have even used the term "data") over the air. The average person may not have even ever heard the term in 2004. But here we are today, in 2019, looking down the barrel of Bluetooth 5.1 and a lot more people know a lot more about this technology. It's so ubiquitous in our everyday life that, chances are, even your grandparents have a device with Bluetooth.
We expect our computers to support Bluetooth. We demand that our wireless headphones run on the very latest version of it, but do we really know what it's all about?
Do you know when Bluetooth was first introduced? Or how it got its name? Why gamers don't like it as much as RF receivers? Why it never seems to work right in your car?
The dedicated team at iMore, along with our sister sites, Android Central and Windows Central, have joined together at the writer's table to come up with answers to the unasked questions of what Bluetooth is, how it affects our daily lives, and where we would be without it.
From the basics of where the Bluetooth name and iconic logo come from, to the weirdest gadgets we could find that support Bluetooth, we've developed a series of 20 articles that cover the broader, informative aspects of the technology to more niche, specific content.
You're guaranteed to find some useful information that you can share around the water cooler. If you're trying to impress your boss, you can dive into the history of the five (plus point-one) major Bluetooth version releases. If you want to have a good laugh, check out our collection of Bluetooth memes (yes, they do exist).
Our Spotlight on Bluetooth coverage can be found below and you can find something that piques your interest by clicking on any of the links. If this sort of content puts a smile on your face, let us know what you want us to spotlight next and we'll hash it out at the writer's table.
bluetooth  overview  mac  ios  android  windows 
3 days ago by rgl7194
Netflix App no longer supports AirPlay on iOS
Netflix has announced that there iOS App will no longer support AirPlay on all iOS devices. The reason for Netflix dropping the AirPlay support is due to some “technical limitations“.
According to a spokesperson from NetFlix, the technical limitations were that the company had problems distinguishing between devices. Such as knowing what is Apple TV vs what isn’t.
Here is the complete statement made by a spokesperson from Netflix:
“We want to make sure our members have a great Netflix experience on any device they use. With AirPlay support rolling out to third-party devices, there isn’t a way for us to distinguish between devices (what is an Apple TV vs. what isn’t) or certify these experiences. Therefore, we have decided to discontinue Netflix AirPlay support to ensure our standard of quality for viewing is being met. Members can continue to access Netflix on the built-in app across Apple TV and other devices.”
AirPlay may no longer work with the Netflix iOS App, but users can still watch their favorite TV shows or movies with the Netflix App on their Apple TV, smart TV, consoles, and directly on any iOS Devices.
netlix  airplay  support  ios  mac 
7 days ago by rgl7194
Netflix kills AirPlay support, because reasons | iMore
Yesterday, you could AirPlay Netflix from any iOS or macOS device to Apple TV. Today, tomorrow, and for the foreseeable future, not so much.
Netflix has already made it clear it wants nothing to do with Apple's TV.app one-stop viewing spot or the upcoming Channels feature where people can subscribe to additional services from within the same interface as Apple's own, also upcoming, TV+. But, now, Netflix also seems to want no more part of Apple's AirPlay content beaming feature either. Which is especially odd given Netflix has supported it until, well, today.
Via MacRumors:
We want to make sure our members have a great Netflix experience on any device they use. With AirPlay support rolling out to third-party devices, there isn't a way for us to distinguish between devices (what is an Apple TV vs. what isn't) or certify these experiences. Therefore, we have decided to discontinue Netflix AirPlay support to ensure our standard of quality for viewing is being met. Members can continue to access Netflix on the built-in app across Apple TV and other devices.
Nilay Patel, on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/reckless/status/1114587772935901184
Gruber, writing at Daring Fireball:
I don't really blame them for calling it a "technical limitation", but it's a bit frustrating that they're throwing out something that already works and has worked for years. And it makes it sound like it's something they can't do, rather than the truth, which is that they've chosen not to.
Either way, it's a shame. While most devices have Netflix either built-in or easily downloadable now, if you're visiting a friend or family member who has an Apple TV or TV set with AirPlay built-in, simply being able to stream from your account, without having to get them to subscribe or having to log yourself in, is way more convenient.
Or, at least it was.
netflix  airplay  support  ios  mac 
7 days ago by rgl7194
How to Change Your Lock Screen Information on macOS – The Sweet Setup
Did you know that macOS allows you to set lock screen information? This is very helpful if you work somewhere where you all have the same device, or if you’re concerned about your device going missing. This feature lets you show a custom message on the lock screen so you can request the device be returned to you, for example.
In System Preferences, go to Security & Privacy, and unlock the pane by clicking the padlock in the bottom left and typing in your password. Now you can enable the Show a message when the screen is locked option, and click Set Lock Message.
Now’s the time you can get creative! You can offer a reward for returning the device, let people know FileVault and Find my Mac are enabled (rendering the device useless to most thieves), and more. Mine is simple: If found, please return to Rosemary Orchard. +1 (XXX) XXX-XXXX, followed by my email address. This lets anyone who picks up my laptop by accident know it’s mine, and should the device go missing, a good samaritan has the means to contact me and reunite me with my laptop!
Even if your Mac never leaves your house, it’s worth adding your email address and phone number to the lock screen — just in case. It takes less than two minutes and has no downside at all, and you can even leave a fun note for your family and friends!
mac  howto  prefs  security  privacy  macosxhints 
7 days ago by rgl7194
What S.M.A.R.T Stats Can Tell You About a Business
Editor’s Note:  Since 2013, Backblaze has published statistics and insights based on the hard drives in our data centers. Why? Well, we like to be helpful, and we thought sharing would help others who rely on hard drives, but don’t have reliable data on performance to make informed purchasing decisions. We also hoped the data might aid manufacturers in improving their products. Given the millions of people who’ve read our Hard Drive Stats posts and the increasingly collaborative relationships we have with manufacturers, it seems we might have been right.
But we don’t only share our take on the numbers, we also provide the raw data underlying our reports so that anyone who wants to can reproduce them or draw their own conclusions, and many have. We love it when people reframe our reports, question our logic (maybe even our sanity?), and provide their own take on what we should do next. That’s why we’re featuring Ryan Smith today.
Ryan has held a lot of different roles in tech, but lately he’s been dwelling in the world of storage as a product strategist for Hitachi. On a personal level, he explains that he has, “passion for data, finding insights from data, and helping others see how easy and rewarding it can be to look under the covers.” It shows.
backup  cloud  mac  backblaze  storage  statistics  business 
14 days ago by rgl7194
Launching Extended Version History for Cloud Backup
This release for consumers and businesses adds one of our most requested enhancements for our Backblaze Cloud Backup service: the ability to keep updated, changed, and even deleted files in your backups forever by extending version history. In addition, we’ve made our Windows and Mac apps even better, updated our Single Sign-on (SSO) support, added more account security options, became Catalina-ready, and increased the functionality of our iOS and Android mobile apps. These changes are awesome and we’re sure you’ll love them!
Extended Version History
Have you ever deleted a file by mistake or accidentally saved over an important bit of work? Backblaze has always kept a 30-day version history of your backed up files to help in situations like these, but today we’re giving you the option to extend your version history to one year or forever. This new functionality is available on the Overview page for Computer Backup, and the Groups Management page if you are using Backblaze Groups! Backblaze v7.0 is required to use Version History. Learn more about versions and extending Version History.
backup  cloud  mac  backblaze  storage  history 
14 days ago by rgl7194
A Decade of Storage Pods: The Road to an Exabyte of Cloud Storage
It’s early 2008, the concept of cloud computing is only just breaking into public awareness, and the economy is in the tank. Despite this less-than-kind business environment, five intrepid Silicon Valley veterans quit their jobs and pooled together $75K to launch a company with a simple goal: provide an easy-to-use, cloud-based backup service at a price that no one in the market could beat — $5 per month per computer.
The only problem: both hosted storage (through existing cloud services) and purchased hardware (buying servers from Dell or Microsoft) were too expensive to hit this price point. Enter Tim Nufire, aka: The Podfather.
Tim led the effort to build what we at Backblaze call the Storage Pod: The physical hardware our company has relied on for data storage for more than a decade. On the occasion of the decade anniversary of the open sourcing of our Storage Pod 1.0 design, we sat down with Tim to relive the twists and turns that led from a crew of backup enthusiasts in an apartment in Palo Alto to a company with four data centers spread across the world holding 2100 storage pods and closing in on an exabyte of storage.
backup  cloud  mac  backblaze  storage  economics  interview  technology 
14 days ago by rgl7194
Petabytes on a Budget: 10 Years and Counting
This post is for all of the storage geeks out there who have followed the adventures of Backblaze and our Storage Pods over the years. The rest of you are welcome to come along for the ride.
It has been 10 years since Backblaze introduced our Storage Pod to the world. In September 2009, we announced our hulking, eye-catching, red 4U storage server equipped with 45 hard drives delivering 67 terabytes of storage for just $7,867 — that was about $0.11 a gigabyte. As part of that announcement, we open-sourced the design for what we dubbed Storage Pods, telling you and everyone like you how to build one, and many of you did.
Backblaze Storage Pod version 1 was announced on our blog with little fanfare. We thought it would be interesting to a handful of folks — readers like you. In fact, it wasn’t even called version 1, as no one had ever considered there would be a version 2, much less a version 3, 4, 4.5, 5, or 6. We were wrong. The Backblaze Storage Pod struck a chord with many IT and storage folks who were offended by having to pay a king’s ransom for a high density storage system. “I can build that for a tenth of the price,” you could almost hear them muttering to themselves. Mutter or not, we thought the same thing, and version 1 was born.
backup  cloud  mac  backblaze  storage  economics  technology 
14 days ago by rgl7194
How to manage your Apple Music subscription on iPhone, iPad, and Mac | iMore
Take control of your Apple Music account on any device.
It doesn't matter if you need to switch your account type or cancel your subscription altogether, you need to be able to manage your Apple Music account on all of your devices. Good thing, then, that Apple makes it fairly easy to do just that.
Whether it's on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac, here's how you manage your Apple Music account.
How to move from an individual Apple Music plan to a Family plan on your iPhone or iPad
How to move from the head of a Family plan to an Individual plan on your iPhone or iPad
How to cancel your Apple Music subscription on your iPhone or iPad
How to switch to a Family Plan for Apple Music on your Mac
How to switch to an individual plan for Apple Music on your Mac
How to cancel your Apple Music subscription on your Mac
music  howto  subscription  iphone  ipad  mac 
25 days ago by rgl7194
Backblaze brings its dirt cheap cloud backups to the enterprise | Ars Technica
The service works, but the pricing is decidedly non-enterprise.
Cloud backup provider Backblaze has launched a new business-oriented backup service called Business Groups that gives its low-cost cloud backup service enterprise manageability and administration. Backblaze does betray its non-enterprise origins, however, by offering clear pricing without hiding behind "ask us for a quote" forms; $5 per month per PC, or $50 (~£40) per year
Backblaze's cloud backup service is something of a novelty. That $50 per year gets you unlimited cloud storage, and while other cloud backup providers have offered unlimited storage, many of them have scaled back those offerings because they don't make anything from them. Backblaze, by contrast, maintains that it actually makes money from its service, on account of the dirt-cheap storage it designs and uses, which costs just a fraction of what services like Amazon S3 and Azure Storage do.
The company added a programmatic cloud storage service, named B2, to its backup plan in 2015. B2 offers developers substantially lower costs, albeit without geographical replication or other features of the more-expensive cloud providers. The company positions this as ideal for cheap backups or replicas of data that is primarily stored in another cloud provider.
backup  cloud  mac  backblaze  enterprise  storage  economics 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
Backblaze: online Time Machine for Mac, and we have invites | Ars Technica
Backblaze is a remote backup service with a few twists, including a "set it …
Competition in the online backup market is heating up now that bandwidth and storage are cheap enough for the average consumer. Backblaze is a service that we checked out in June for Windows users that has a "set it and forget it" approach like Mac OS X's Time Machine; the client backs up nearly everything on the computer to make sure no crucial bytes are lost. Now, Backblaze is back with the official launch of its Mac client (in beta, naturally), and we scored 300 invites for Ars Technica readers.
Like its competitors, such as Mozy, Backblaze provides a software client that watches over files on the drive, then uploads any files marked in directories for backup to Backblaze's managed data centers. Configurable via a System Preferences pane, Backblaze can work on a schedule or run in the background to keep an eye on file changes as you make them, and your files are encrypted before transmission with AES military grade encryption, and transmitted over an encrypted SSL connection. For extra security, you can use a private encryption key which Backblaze never stores, but if you lose that key, your backup files are as good as gone.
backup  cloud  mac  review  backblaze 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
Making off-site backups brainless: hands-on with Backblaze | Ars Technica
Backing up to an external drive is smart. Backing up to an off-site data …
Storage and bandwidth prices have finally hit a sweet spot to make off-site backup services feasible for the general consumer. A small handful of companies that provide secure storage and a simple client for over-the-web backups have emerged in recent years, but a new company called Backblaze is debuting today with some unique features and a different perspective on how this type of service should work. We sat down for a chat with Gleb Budman, CEO and co-founder of Backblaze, and took the company's product for a spin around our desktop to see if we can get in the habit of backing up off-site. We also scored 300 invites for Ars Technica readers, but don't worry: we won't make you confess to being a backup luddite to get one.
An off-site backup service, if you've never heard of one, allows you to backup your data to a secure data center. This is typically accomplished by installing a configurable local client that watches over your files, continuously uploading new and updated copies. Usually, these clients can be customized to only kick in at specific times of the day or week, and to only back up certain kinds of data or specific directories. The idea is that, while backing up to an external hard drive connected to your computer is smart, that drive won't do you much good if it gets stolen or your house burns down.
The problem with other services, according to Gleb, is that they often require too much setup. "Set it and forget" still isn't sinking in with consumers because the configuration process is sometimes convoluted or confusing. We've had experience with Mozy ourselves, for example, an off-site backup service whose client requires you to select specific directories or file types to watch and backup. In Gleb's experience, however, too many customers are still getting confused or feel defeated by the opt-in style of backing up. For example: sometimes these services don't count files from alternative word processors like Apple's Pages in the "Documents" category for backing up, while others exclude Photoshop documents from the "Images" category.
backup  cloud  mac  review  backblaze 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
Cloud backup service Backblaze is raising its prices - The Verge
Customers can still lock in the old prices for another year
Backblaze is a fantastic option for automatically backing up your computer’s files to the cloud, where they’re free from the potential threats of theft or damage that external hard drives can face. But as with many good things, this one is about to get a bit more expensive. The company has announced that it’s going to be increasing its subscription costs slightly beginning on March 11th. The month-by-month subscription will rise from $5 to $6, and the annual fee will jump to $60 from the current $50. The two-year plan is increasing to $110 versus the previous $95 price. Backblaze is available for both Mac and Windows.
Backblaze says the small uptick in cost is justified by the many improvements, enhancements, and faster backups that the service offers today versus a year or two ago. They include:
Removed all limits on what can be backed up. Originally 4GB was the maximum size any individual file could be and VM images, ISOs, plus other file types that aren’t typically user data were excluded.
Sped up backups. Combined small files into bundles, added threading to allow 30 backup processes at once, and added automatic thread management. This means your data gets backed up as fast as your setup allows.
Expanded restore options. Expanded the maximum size of Restore by Mail from 0.5 TB to 8 TB on a hard drive, and from a 4 GB DVD to a 256 GB flash drive. We also introduced the Restore Return Refund program. It’s a program our customers love but most other players in the industry have abandoned due to the costs of shipping, packaging, drive replacement, etc.
A bunch of other features. Locate My Computer, Preview/Access/Share, two-factor verification, iOS/Android apps, network management, Save to B2, and many of the other features/functions not only incurred development costs but have ongoing server/bandwidth expenses.
The company also points to rising market costs for storage as another factor, saying that the effects of the 2011 Thailand floods are still being felt today. Before the new rates kick in, Backblaze is giving customers the option to extend their service an additional year for $50 per computer. There’s an FAQ on the extension if you need more details. Network drives are the main exception to Backblaze’s unlimited backups; the service won't save your NAS setup to the cloud without workarounds.
Backing up everything on your computer to cloud storage is a nice convenience, but you should always have your files in at least two places besides your PC itself. So an external drive with a local, regularly updated copy of your Mac or PC is still a must-have.
backup  cloud  mac  backblaze  update  money 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
Backblaze Cloud Storage Service Review | Cloud Storage Advice
Price - 100%
Speed - 95%
Security - 95%
Online Reviews - 95%
Storage - 95%
96%
Summary
www.backblaze.com
User Review 10/10 (2 votes)
Backblaze is a strong contender for the title of best online backup service. This cloud backup solution focuses just as much on security as it does on integration. And, as it turns out, these two have far more in common than you might think. We’ll see what that means in our Backblaze review. We’ll also discuss Backblaze pricing and features, as well as a few Backblaze alternatives.
Backblaze – General Info
Backblaze is a cloud backup service that offers both personal and business backup, as well as B2 cloud storage. You can use it to create a secure cloud storage for all your important files. They focus quite a lot on security and transparency. And Backblaze pricing tiers are surprisingly affordable for the services they offer. However, Backblaze is perhaps better suited for small businesses or freelancers working from home. If you’re simply looking for online storage space, Backblaze might be a little bit excessive...
Our Verdict
To conclude our Backblaze review, we can safely say this cloud backup service is a fairly good choice both for home and business backup. The simple infrastructure it uses, coupled with the fact that Backblaze uses native software to operate makes it a highly secure cloud backup option. However, Backblaze may feel a bit bulky when it comes to home use, as all you can do is upload and download your files, with very few customization options. Still, if you are in the market for a solid cloud backup solution, Backblaze is definitely worth considering.
backup  cloud  mac  review  backblaze 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
Backblaze Review: The best cloud backup service — The Sweet Setup
Backing up your files to an off-site cloud server is an easy, affordable, and safe way to make sure that your most important files are safe. For our review, we tested, used, and researched the most popular services, and we recommend Backblaze. It’s the easiest to set up and use. It’s also quite affordable.
To get started, you simply download the Backblaze app from their website, create an account, and then let the app do its thing...
Conclusion
Historically, people have tended to not back up their computers because it seems difficult, expensive, or both. The truth is, however, that keeping duplicate copies of data is easier and cheaper than ever.
As we all store more than ever on our computers, not having the data stored in multiple locations is just plain foolish. 100-percent of computers will fail and all hard drives will die. A good backup solution is easy and automated, and it puts your data on multiple drives in multiple places. Using a cloud backup service answers these needs.
backup  cloud  mac  review  backblaze  comparo 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
Backblaze review | TechRadar
A flaming good SaaS service
OUR VERDICT
Backblaze delivers a simple to use tool that secures all the critical files on a computer irrespective of how many there are, and can restore them easily should the worst happen.
FOR
Unlimited backup
Low cost
Restore options
AGAINST
30-day versioning
No mobile support
Private key issues
...Final verdict
The key weaknesses of the Backblaze offering are the lack of support for any mobile devices. And, the basic service covers only one computer, negating the possibility of using it to sync multiple systems.
The private key that you must give up to restore also isn’t ideal, and we hope that Backblaze come up with a better methodology than merely promising to forget it after use.
It might not look very exciting or have the subtle controls that some other solutions offer, but Backblaze does a decent job a minimal cost.
backup  cloud  mac  review  backblaze 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
Backblaze Cloud Backup - Full Review and Benchmarks | Tom's Guide
Backblaze is cheap, simple, fast and easy to use. But you might want to shop around if you have multiple machines to back up.
OUR VERDICT
Backblaze is cheap, simple, fast and easy to use. But you might want to shop around if you have multiple machines to back up.
FOR
Inexpensive
Unlimited storage
Simple setup process
Rapid upload speeds
Very easy to use
Generous drive-shipping policy
Lost-computer tracker
AGAINST
No multiple-computer plans
No support for network-attached storage drives
Weak mobile apps
Few extra features
backup  cloud  mac  review  backblaze 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
Backblaze Review - Updated 2019
Backblaze is Cloudwards.net's top online backup provider thanks to its stellar ease of use and friendly pricing. That's not to say it's perfect, though, so read our full Backblaze review before you commit and make sure it's the best option for you.
backup  cloud  mac  review  backblaze 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
Best Cloud Backup Services 2019 | Tom's Guide
We've crowned the best cloud backup service based on features, convenience and price
You may regularly back up your computer's data to an external hard drive — and if not, you should — but that really won't be enough. A cloud-backup service can help.
Both your PC and your local backup drive could be lost at the same time to theft, flood or fire. The best cloud backup services, also known as online-backup services, help you avoid such data disasters. They copy your valuable information to an offsite repository that never goes offline and is available from anywhere, preventing total catastrophe.
Based on more than 40 hours of testing, we think the best cloud backup service is IDrive ($13.90 for the first year for Tom's Guide readers), which backs up an unlimited number of PCs, Macs, smartphones and tablets for a reasonable price. IDrive is the best choice if you have multiple computers and phones to back up.
Our value pick is the very user-friendly Backblaze, which gives you unlimited storage space for just $60 per year, but backs up only one machine (and an attached external drive) per account. Backblaze is the best cloud backup service if you have a single computer and just want to back it up without worrying about the details.
mac  backup  cloud  review  comparo  backblaze 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
Backblaze updated with macOS Catalina support and unlimited version history
One of the best online backup solutions just got better.
What you need to know
Backblaze has a new macOS update out.
Official Catalina support is added.
As is unlimited version history.
Backblaze is one of the most popular online backup solutions around and with good reason. It offers unlimited backups for just a few dollars a month and the Mac app is native, so it won't grind your system down. And now that app has been updated to version 7.0.
With this update Backblaze gains official macOS 10.15 Catalina support along with improved handling of macOS system messages. The app now deals with Catalina's more restrictive security settings, too.
We've added support for MacOS Catalina and improved some MacOS system messages. MacOS provides some great new features for the Mac and we've changed some of our apps' behavior to better fit Catalina. In Catalina, Apple is now requiring apps to ask for permission more frequently, and since Backblaze is a backup application, we require a lot of permissions. Thus you may notice more system messages when installing Backblaze on the new OS.
Backblaze has also made sure that nobody will ever lose a file thanks to unlimited version history. It's a paid upgrade to the standard Backblaze plan, but if you need to be able to undo changes to files without a time limit the fees are a bargain. Especially compared to the potential risk of losing data.
Extending your Version History from 30 days or one year to forever means that Backblaze will never remove files from your Backblaze backup whether you've updated, changed, or fully deleted them from your computer, or not. Extending Version History to forever is similar to one year, at an additional $2 per month (prorated to your license plan type) plus $0.005/GB/month for versions modified on your computer more than one year ago.
Existing users are being upgraded to Backblaze 7.0 in the coming weeks, but you can manually kick the update off by clicking the Backblaze icon and seleting "Check for Updates".
backup  mac  update  history 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
Report says developers encountering issues porting iPad apps to Mac | iMore
Apple made it sound so easy.
What you need to know
A new report highlights the frustration developers feel about Apple's Catalyst.
Catalyst is designed to allow developers to port iPad apps to Mac.
Apple's one-click messaging, however, is more complex than originally thought.
When Apple debuted macOS Catalina, one of the most exciting features was Catalyst, a new set of tools that allows developers to port their iPad apps to Mac with ease. Many developers, however, are finding it's not as easy as Apple made it seem.
A report from Bloomberg says developers are frustrated by Catalyst at this early stage, with some even rebuffing taking part in the technology altogether — at least for now.
Apple rolled out Catalyst, the technology to transition iPad apps into Mac versions, on Monday. It's the initial step toward a bigger goal: By 2021, developers should be able to build an app once and have it work on iPhones, iPads and Mac computers through a single, unified App Store. But the first iteration, which appears to still be quite raw and in a number of ways frustrating to developers, risks upsetting users who may have to pay again when they download the Mac version of an iPad app they've already bought.
Developers have said they had to worker much harder than expected in order to port their iPad app to Mac. There also seems to be a lack of documentation surrounding Catalyst, making it tough for iOS developers who are unfamiliar with Mac to create a working Mac app. That contrasts with Apple's messaging about Catalyst; the company has made it sound like all it takes is checking a box.
catalyst  apps  ipad  mac  developer 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
How to back up your Mac: The ultimate guide | iMore
How do you back up your Mac locally and off-site or online so all your important photos and files stay safe and sound? Like this!
You absolutely have to back up your Mac. If you don't, one day — maybe tomorrow, maybe next week or next year — you will lose something important and irreplaceable and there will be nothing future you can do but curse at and blame past you. I don't say this to scare you. I say it to save you. Back up. Do it now. And do it like this.
Why do you need to back up?
One copy of your data is no copies at all. That's because hard drives and solid state drives (SSD) fail. They fail all the time. Two copies of your data is basically one copy, since there's a chance both could fail at the same time.
To make sure your data is safe you want to back it up in a way that minimizes the chance you could ever lose it. Realistically, that means a local back up as well as an off-site or online backup.
What's a local back up and how do you do it?
A local back up is literally taking a the data on your Mac and copying it to another drive in your home or office. Both copies are in the same place, so you can easily get to the back up when and if you need it, and either keep it up-to-date or restore from it if something bad happens to the original.
There are a couple ways to do a local backup. The first and easiest is with Apple's built-in Time Machine.
backup  mac  howto  cloud  guide 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
How to sync your iPhone and iPad with your Mac in macOS Catalina | iMore
You can still sync your mobile device with Mac even without iTunes
In macOS Catalina, Apple replaced the iTunes app with three new apps, Music, Apple Podcasts, and Apple TV. If you still use iTunes on your Mac to sync your iPhone and iPad, don't worry. You can still use your computer to perform this task. It's just different on the new macOS.
Where to sync your iPhone or iPad on macOS Catalina
How to sync music to your iPhone or iPad on macOS Catalina
How to sync movies to your iPhone or iPad on macOS Catalina
How to sync TV shows to your iPhone or iPad on macOS Catalina
How to sync podcasts to your iPhone or iPad on macOS Catalina
How to sync audiobooks to your iPhone or iPad on macOS Catalina
How to sync books to your iPhone or iPad on macOS Catalina
How to sync photos to your iPhone or iPad on macOS Catalina
How to sync files to your iPhone or iPad on macOS Catalina
How to backup your iPhone or iPad on macOS Catalina
How to restore your iPhone or iPad on macOS Catalina
iphone  ipad  sync  macOS  10.15  howto  mac 
4 weeks ago by rgl7194
books - Locating the iBooks folder in iCloud Drive - Ask Different
I'm using iCloud drive to sync my e-books via the iBooks app.
I noticed that the synced files show up in the All My Files view. I tried to find out their exact location, it seems to be iCloud Drive / iBooks (via Cmd+I) but when I try to navigate there from iCloud Drive, the iBooks folder doesn't show up, even when I turn hidden files on.
Is that a bug or how come this behaviour?

you can't see it when you browse iCloud Drive in the Finder, a easy way to get to it:
Open any PDF; when it opens in Preview, right-click the titlebar and click "iBooks (iCloud)". When the iBooks finder window opens drag the iBooks folder icon in the titlebar to your sidebar. now you have quick access to your ibooks. You can now drag and drop books on that folder and they will be there when you open iBooks app.
In Mojave it appears it's no longer possible to drag the Books (formerly iBooks) folder icon to the sidebar. However with the folder open/frontmost (and with nothing inside the folder selected) selecting File > Add to Sidebar does the trick.
Or you can create a symbolic link in the home folder by running
ln -s ~/Library/Mobile\ Documents/iCloud\~com\~apple\~iBooks/Documents/ ~/iBooks
ibooks  icloud  macosxhints  mac 
6 weeks ago by rgl7194
Mac Power Users 499: Backups and Updates — MacSparky
Backing up our Macs, iPhones, and iPads is easier than ever, but many people don't bother making sure their data is safe and sound. On this week’s episode of Mac Power Users, Stephen and I talk through some basic backup strategies before offering some advice when considering upgrading to new versions of macOS and iOS.
MPU  podcast  backup  upgrade  mac  iphone  ipad  ios 
6 weeks ago by rgl7194
Mac Power Users #499: Backups and Updates - Relay FM
September 8th, 2019 · 96 minutes
Backing up our Macs, iPhones and iPads is easier than ever, but many people don't bother making sure their data is safe and sound. This week, David and Stephen talk through some basic backup strategies before offering some advice when considering upgrading to new versions of macOS and iOS.
LINKS AND SHOW NOTES
Support St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Stephen's Stickered MacBookPro
The 3-2-1 Backup Rule – Data Protection Strategy
Back up your Mac with Time Machine - Apple Support
Hard Drive Reliability in 2019: Failure Rates of 108,461 Drives - Backblaze
How to Set up Time Machine Server – 512 Pixels
Restore your Mac from a backup - Apple Support
Use Time Machine to restore deleted files or older files - Apple Support
Backblaze
Backblaze Storage Pod
Crashplan
Arq
Carbon Copy Cloner
SuperDuper
ChronoSync
About backups for iOS devices - Apple Support
How to back up your iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch - Apple Support
DaisyDisk
iCloud storage plans and pricing - Apple Support
Use Quick Start to transfer data from your previous iOS device to your new iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch - Apple Support
How to use the iPhone migration tool in iOS 12.4 - 9to5Mac
macOS Catalina - Apple
Michael Tsai - Blog - Annoying Catalina Security Features
Go64
Why the iOS 13.1 Beta is a Good Thing — MacSparky
iOS 13 Preview - Apple
MPU  podcast  backup  upgrade  mac  iphone  ipad  ios 
6 weeks ago by rgl7194
Online User's Guide - Send Faxes from Your Application (Mac)
Related Models:MFC‑L2710DW / MFC‑L2717DW / MFC‑L2730DW / MFC‑L2750DW / MFC‑L2750DWXL
PC-FAX supports only black and white faxes. A black and white fax will be sent even if the original data is color and the receiving fax machine supports color faxes.
Create a document in a Mac application.
From an application, such as Apple TextEdit, click the File menu, and then select Print.
Click the application pop-up menu, and then select the Send Fax option.
Click the Output pop-up menu, and then select the Facsimile option.
Type a fax number in the Input Fax Number field, and then click Add.
The fax number is displayed in the Destination Fax Numbers field.
To send a fax to more than one number, click the Add button after entering the first fax number and type the next fax number. The destination fax numbers will be listed in the Destination Fax Numbers field.
Click Print to send the fax.
printing  mac  guide  macosxhints  support 
6 weeks ago by rgl7194
How to make a bootable Mojave drive to downgrade from macOS Catalina | iMore
macOS Catalina is the new hotness right now, but you may not want to keep it. You may want to go back to Mojave.
If you are planning to install macOS Catalina, there is one additional set of steps you should follow. You should download a bootable copy of macOS Mojave. This is also the only way to downgrade if you decide you don't like macOS Catalina.
Before you start
How to format your external drive for Mac
How to make your external drive bootable for installing Mojave
How to use Mojave as an installer boot drive
Before you start
Before you get started, make sure you have a thumb drive with at least 15GB of storage, or a spare external hard drive (one that you don't use with anything else).
You'll also need to download macOS Mojave from the Mac App Store.
Note:
After macOS Mojave has downloaded, it will automatically begin the installation process. Close the installer instead.
Please, Please, Please, backup your Mac before you do anything.
mac  macOS  backup  10.14  10.15  upgrade 
6 weeks ago by rgl7194
Daring Fireball: Google Chrome Update Rendered Macs Without System Integrity Protection Unbootable
Mr. Macintosh:
Sometimes Avid Media Creators use 3rd Party Graphics cards connected to their Mac Pro. When the issue hit yesterday, it was thought that Avid was the main cause of the problems since all the users experiencing the issue had Avid software.
Only later after a MacAdmins deep dive investigation was it found that AVID was NOT the cause of the problem but the Google Chrome was!
Nice detective work here to figure out that Chrome was to blame. The Chrome updater was deleting the /var symlink at the root of the startup volume.
Google:
We recently discovered that a Chrome update may have shipped with a bug that damages the file system on macOS machines with System Integrity Protection (SIP) disabled, including machines that do not support SIP. We’ve paused the release while we finalize a new update that addresses the problem.
Why in the world would a web browser’s software updater be doing anything at all at the root level of the boot volume? The arrogance and presumptuousness here boggles the mind. This is like hiring someone to wash your windows and finding out they damaged the foundation of your house. And people wonder why Apple requires Chrome to be a sandboxed app that uses WebKit on iOS.
mac  privacy  security  google  chrome  troubleshooting  file_system  bug 
7 weeks ago by rgl7194
Mac Power Users #500: David in the Hot Seat - Relay FM
Stephen marks the 500th episode of Mac Power Users by interviewing David about his career, technology and choice of light saber color.
MPU  mac  podcast  interview  anniversary 
8 weeks ago by rgl7194
Do Macs need antivirus software? | The Mac Security Blog
One of the most common questions Intego receives is whether Macs need antivirus software. Naturally, it's fair for you to assume that our opinion may be a bit biased—not just because Intego offers antivirus software as well as a full security suite to protect Macs, but also because our malware researchers are at the front line, and regularly discover new malware that targets the Mac.
But if you want to make your own informed decision about whether Macs need antivirus software, you'll need to examine the facts. Let's explore such topics as what built-in protection macOS offers, what types of threats it can and cannot stop, and several common myths about antivirus software.
First, let's get some terminology out of the way. While the industry still talks about "anti-virus" software, there hasn't been a virus that affects the Mac in a very long time (unless you count Microsoft Office macro viruses). However, malware—which is the broad category for any malicious software designed to do things such as damage or steal files, spy on a user by recording photos, videos, or keystrokes, or usurp a user's identity—is rampant on both Windows and Mac.
mac  malware  security  privacy 
11 weeks ago by rgl7194
Safari, Chrome, Firefox: Which is the most private browser for Mac? | The Mac Security Blog
Everyone needs a web browser, and while Safari comes pre-installed on Macs, many people choose to use a different browser. You may want to do this for compatibility reasons—there may be sites or services you use that Safari doesn't handle correctly—or because you use a different browser at work; if you want to be able to sync bookmarks and history from your work browser to your personal browser, then it can be useful to use the same app on your computers in both locations.
But another thing to consider is web browser security and privacy. Not all browsers handle your data optimally, and few are developed with privacy and security as a primary focus. In this article, we'll discuss the three main web browsers for macOS—Safari, Chrome, and Firefox—and look at several alternatives, from a privacy and security perspective.
(You may also want to check out our companion article about which iOS browser is best for security and privacy.)
mac  browser  safari  comparo  review  privacy  chrome  firefox  microsoft  tor 
11 weeks ago by rgl7194
Mac Power Users #496: Keyboard Hacking with Brett Terpstra - Relay FM
Brett Terpstra joins in the Mac Power Users this week to talk about his keyboard hacks, planning workflows, some of Brett's favorite apps, and the looming arrival of Brett's new app, nvUltra.
MPU  mac  podcast  keyboard  hack  workflow 
12 weeks ago by rgl7194
Daring Fireball: App Store Editorial Stories Are Now Available on the Web
Benjamin Mayo, writing for 9to5Mac:
Apple has recently updated its App Store Preview pages for stories to allow users to view the full content of stories from inside their desktop web browser. App Store stories have always been shareable as links, but the web version was just a title and a navigation link to ‘open this story in the App Store’.
Between August 9th and August 11th, Apple has upgraded the experience and now includes full imagery, app lists and paragraphs copy in the web version. This means you can access the same content online as you would be ale to find in the native App Store experience.
Apple has put together a great editorial staff for the App Store, and works with many talented freelance writers and artists, so it’s great that their work can now be seen on the regular web. I have many times decided against linking to App Store articles simply because the stories weren’t on the web — prior to this, the only way to read them was using a recent version of iOS or MacOS. I get that these stories are intended to drive engagement with the App Store, but it just seemed spiteful not to put them on the open web.
Here, for example, is a nice write-up about Yoink, one of my very favorite Mac utilities.
UPDATE: Mayo, on Twitter, points to one significant shortcoming of these articles on the web — they don’t include video.
apps  store  safari  browser  mac  windows  daring_fireball 
12 weeks ago by rgl7194
Apple Brings App Store Editorials to the Web - MacStories
Benjamin Mayo, reporting for 9to5Mac:
Apple has recently updated its App Store Preview pages for stories to allow users to view the full content of stories from inside their desktop web browser. App Store stories have always been shareable as links, but the web version was just a title and a navigation link to ‘open this story in the App Store’.
Between August 9th and August 11th, Apple has upgraded the experience and now includes full imagery, app lists and paragraphs copy in the web version. This means you can access the same content online as you would be ale to find in the native App Store experience.
Historically, App Store editorials could only be viewed inside the App Store itself, whether on an iPhone, iPad, or Mac. Anyone not using an Apple device would thus be unable to view such stories, even if they had the appropriate link for them. Now, however, every App Store editorial can be read in full on the web. iOS devices still default to opening stories in the App Store, but you can now open a story’s link in Safari on the Mac, or in browsers on non-Apple devices.
Apple still doesn’t let you initiate app downloads from the web, so while you will be able to see preview pages for apps from a browser, to start a download you’ll need to visit the App Store or Mac App Store.
apps  store  safari  browser  mac  windows 
12 weeks ago by rgl7194
App Store editorials are now available in a web browser
No more frustration when you click an App Store editorial link on a PC.
What you need to know
App Store editorials can be read in-browser.
Links still open in the App Store on iPhone and iPad.
You still can't download apps from a browser.
Until recently anyone clicking a link to an App Store editorial on a non-Apple device would only see a short description and a link to open it in the App Store. Of course, that wasn't much use on devices that didn't have an App Store to open those links in.
As 9to5Mac notes, this all changed between August 9th and August 11th. Now, anyone clicking an App Store editorial link will see the full story inside a web browser. All images and copy are included and the layout maintained.
Anyone clicking a link on iPhone or iPad will continue to be redirected to the App Store automatically. But those on a Mac will see the web version open in Safari just as those on non-Apple devices will.
Despite this improvement the experience is still lacking when it comes to downloading the apps that the editorial promotes. Apple doesn't allow the downloading of apps to be initiated from a web browser. Instead, users must find the app in the App Store for themselves and then download it from there.
This move will definitely improve the visibility of App Store editorials. Apple's content team has been crushing it and by making their work more easily accessible more people will see it. If that then turns into more app downloads, developers win, too.
This isn't the first time Apple has improved the experience for those accessing information on the web. It also recently revamped the web interface for podcast listings, too. This saw web-based playback and dedicated pages for individual podcast episodes brought to the web for the first time.
apps  store  safari  browser  mac  windows 
12 weeks ago by rgl7194
macOS Accessibility Keyboard - NSHipster
For a while now, the distinction between “desktop” and “mobile” has become increasingly tenuous. As the computers in our pockets grow ever more capable, they more closely resemble the computers typically situated on our desks and laps. This trend was especially pronounced in this year’s WWDC, with the announcement of Catalyst and iPadOS.
Today, what’s the difference between a MacBook and an iPad? Practically speaking, you might point to the presence or absence of a physical keyboard, a SIM card, or an ARM processor (and if the rumors about next year’s MacBook models are to believed, those latter two may soon cease to be a distinction).
For many of us, a physical keyboard is the defining trait that makes a computer a “desktop” computer in the traditional sense; when you purchase an external keyboard for your iPad, you do so to make it “desktop”-like. But for many others — including those of us with a physical disability — a typewriter-like keyboard is but one of many input methods available to desktop users.
This week on NSHipster, we’re taking a look at the macOS Accessibility Keyboard. Beyond its immediate usefulness as an assistive technology, the Accessibility Keyboard challenges us to think differently about the nature of input methods and any remaining distinction between mobile and desktop computers.
Introduced in macOS High Sierra, the Accessibility Keyboard lets you type and interact with your Mac without the use of a physical keyboard.
To turn it on, open System Preferences, click the Accessibility preference pane, select “Keyboard” under the “Interactions” section in the sidebar. (Alternatively, you can search for “Accessibility Keyboard” and navigate to the first result).
mac  accessibility  keyboard 
august 2019 by rgl7194
macOS Accessibility Keyboard - MacStories
Lovely deep dive by Mattt Thompson on one of macOS’ most powerful Accessibility features – the Accessibility Keyboard:
Today, what’s the difference between a MacBook and an iPad? Practically speaking, you might point to the presence or absence of a physical keyboard, a SIM card, or an ARM processor (and if the rumors about next year’s MacBook models are to believed, those latter two may soon cease to be a distinction).
For many of us, a physical keyboard is the defining trait that makes a computer a “desktop” computer in the traditional sense; when you purchase an external keyboard for your iPad, you do so to make it “desktop”-like. But for many others — including those of us with a physical disability — a typewriter-like keyboard is but one of many input methods available to desktop users.
This week on NSHipster, we’re taking a look at the macOS Accessibility Keyboard. Beyond its immediate usefulness as an assistive technology, the Accessibility Keyboard challenges us to think differently about the nature of input methods and any remaining distinction between mobile and desktop computers.
Combined with the Panel Editor app, macOS allows you to design any kind of “keyboard” that goes beyond text input. I’ve written about this topic before when I shared my custom Accessibility Keyboard setup to launch AppleScripts, which you can find here.
mac  accessibility  keyboard 
august 2019 by rgl7194
If you're not using Apple Family Sharing, you're wasting money - CNET
How a feature built into nearly every iOS and Mac device can save you cash.
When Apple's Family Sharing feature launched with iOS 8, it solved a major problem: Giving family members access to apps that one of them already paid for, without having to buy it again just for a spouse or child to use it. Before Family Sharing emerged, you'd have to shared your Apple ID password with family members, which is both inconvenient and insecure. At the time, sharing an Apple ID password was the only way to log into the App Store and iTunes to access another user's purchase history, so you could download paid apps without, well, paying.
Now, Family Sharing has evolved into a feature for sharing Apple Music subscriptions and iCloud storage plans, without making you double or triple spend on apps, and without invalidating the security of your password by passing it around. Family Sharing even lets you help find a lost device thanks to integrated location sharing.
Family Sharing isn't complicated to set up, taking only a few minutes by each member of the group. Before you create a family sharing group, make sure you know who the family organizer is -- they are responsible for setting up the group and sending out invites. 
apple  family  sharing  mac  ios 
august 2019 by rgl7194
Parallels Desktop 15 is out now and it introduces new features like Sidecar support | iMore
You can now do way more with Parallels.
What you need to know
Parallels Desktop 15 was released today.
The new update adds a bevy of new features that round out the experience.
Among the updates is support for Sidecar, letting you turn your iPad into a Windows secondary display.
Today Parallels Desktop 15 was announced introducing a whole new array of features for the Mac program that lets users run Windows and Linux without rebooting. Among the major updates is support for many macOS Catalina features like Sidecar, support for DirectX 11 and more.
With support for DirectX 11 via the switch to Metal, performance should see an impressive boost. Parallels says 3D graphics will render 15% faster, Microsoft Office apps could launch up to 80% faster and the overall user interface should be much more responsive.
Along with the support of Sidecar, which is a new feature in macOS Catalina that turns the iPad Pro into a secondary display, new controls for the Apple Pencil via the Touch Bar were added. You will now be able to toggle between pen, eraser and mouse modes.
mac  virtualization  windows  macOS  10.15  performance 
august 2019 by rgl7194
Parallels Desktop 15 for Mac moves to Metal for DirectX 11 and more | Ars Technica
Update promises better graphics performance in games and CAD applications.
Today, popular virtualization software Parallels Desktop 15 for Mac becomes available to new and current users. The flagship feature is support for DirectX in virtual Windows machines via Apple's proprietary Metal graphics API. Other additions include a handful of new macOS Catalina-related features and improvements to transitions between Mac and Windows software running on the same machine.
When we wrote about Parallels Desktop 14 around this time last year, we asked about Metal support. The application then still relied entirely on OpenGL in macOS, and Apple had already announced that continued support for OpenGL would end. We were told it was coming, and we were not misled: the new version of Parallels Desktop now supports DirectX 9, 10, and 11 via Metal. Previously, DirectX 9 and 10 were supported via OpenGL and DirectX 11 was not supported at all. Parallels' rep noted to us that "Metal and DirectX work best in Catalina."
mac  virtualization  windows  macOS  10.15  performance 
august 2019 by rgl7194
Intego Mac Podcast: Hacking humans: How to avoid social engineering scams
ABOUT THIS EPISODE
Kirk and Josh take a close look at how you can be scammed by social engineering techniques. They also discuss Apple's recent updates to iOS 9 and 10, a report about the increase in malware targeting Macs, and some good and bad news about Google.
Update your iPhone or iPad software to avoid issues with location, date, and time
The GPS Week Number Rollover: what you need to know
“The sample numbers of new malware for macOS nearly tripled”
MacVoices #19189: Josh Long of Intego On Malware, Security, Privacy, and Safety Online
Google employees are eavesdropping, even in your living room
Google Chrome Update Will Close 'Loophole' That Tipped Sites Off to Your Incognito Mode
Phishing Dangers in Business and How to Avoid Getting Hooked
How Apple and Amazon Security Flaws Led to My Epic Hacking
The Honeymooners - Swanee River (YouTube)
Turns Out Wearing a Hi-Vis Vest Gets You Into Everything for Free
podcast  mac  social_engineering  security  privacy  malware  ios  google  scam 
august 2019 by rgl7194
Behind the Mac — Test the Impossible — Apple - YouTube
Apple
Published on Aug 1, 2019
From podcasts to programming, photography to fashion design, college students around the world are doing more than ever outside the classroom.
See how the next generation is pursuing their creative passions and testing the impossible behind the Mac.
Shop for Mac at: https://apple.co/2OIJgjg
Category
Science & Technology
advertising  apple  commercials  mac  youtube 
august 2019 by rgl7194
Apple's new Behind the Mac ad wants people to test the impossible | iMore
Nothing is impossible if you set your mind to it.
What you need to know
Apple released a new Behind the Mac ad.
Titled "Test the Impossible," it nudges Mac users to aim for the impossible.
It continues Apple's strong legacy of delivering inspiring ads for its products.
Apple wants you to test the impossible. That is the clear message in its latest Behind the Mac ad that wants users of its Mac to not settle for merely achieving what is possible, but going beyond them.
The video titled "Test the Impossible," shows various glimpses of artists working on various artistic projects. It is narrated by voice nudging the viewer to reach for the impossible and not settle for merely staying within the lines of what is possible.
Here's what the narrator says:
You have no idea what you are doing. This is great. People who know what they are doing know the rules, and they know what is possible and what is impossible. You do not. The rules and what is possible and impossible in the arts were made by people who have not test the bounds of the possible by going beyond them. And you can.
It follows Apple's knack for creating striking and inspiring videos for its products. It doesn't really have anything to do with a Mac, but with all of the people in the video using a Mac, it makes it very clear that if you own a Mac, you can achieve the impossible.
Check out the video for yourself. It is very inspiring.
apple  mac  commercials  advertising  video 
august 2019 by rgl7194
Daring Fireball: Jony Ive Describes the 20th Anniversary Macintosh in 1997
This was so early in Ive’s career that he still had hair, and went by “Jon Ive”. The 20th Anniversary Mac was a weird beast, starting with the fact it commemorated the 20th anniversary of the company, not the Mac (which was 11 years old at the time). The main thing is it was never meant to sell at scale — it started at $7,500 and according to Wikipedia Apple only ever made 12,000 of them. It was a shipping prototype, effectively.
But the design clearly presaged what we now know as the modern iMac, which effectively is the modern desktop: all-in-one design, LCD display (this was truly radical in 1997), good built-in speakers, and an attempt to minimize the tangle of cables most PCs and Macs had in the back. All the hallmarks of Ive’s design sense are there.
jony_ive  mac  anniversary  90s  daring_fireball 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Removing the 'On this iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch' feature | Sonos
We first launched the 'On this iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch' feature in 2012 as an option to play locally stored audio content on Sonos. The way this feature was originally architected has become unreliable with newer versions of iOS.
In the coming months, this feature will no longer be available in the Sonos app.  
How can I listen to tracks stored on my iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch?
You have a few different options for playing tracks that are stored on your iOS device to Sonos.
Apple AirPlay 2
Upload your tracks to a streaming music service
Stream from an online music service’s catalogue
Play your tracks to Sonos from a Mac, PC, or NAS drive
iphone  sonos  support  NAS  plex  airplay  apps  mac  streaming  music 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Daring Fireball: Apple Is Sending Out Another Silent Update To Fix the Webcam Flaw in Zoom’s Partner Apps
...So here’s an interesting question. I’ve been using the phrase “nonconsensual technology” to describe Zoom’s invisible web server that remained installed and running even after you deleted the Zoom app. But when Apple first issued a silent, emergency system update to remove Zoom’s software, a few DF readers emailed or tweeted to ask: Isn’t this “nonconsensual technology” too?
Clearly, the answer sounds like yes at first. Users get no indication of the update, and “requires no user action” makes it sound like it’s mandatory. But there is a setting to control this, allowing Mac users to disable the automatic installation of such updates. On MacOS 10.14 Mojave, it’s in System Prefs → Software Update → Advanced (screenshot); on 10.13 High Sierra, it’s in System Prefs → App Store (screenshot). In both versions, the checkbox is labeled “Install system data files and security updates”, and resides at the bottom of the section that controls what gets installed automatically.
This option is enabled by default — even if you choose to install regular system updates manually — which is why the vast majority of Mac users are getting these “silent” updates automatically. But if you disable this option, even these silent updates won’t be installed automatically. I confirmed this with an Apple spokesperson, who emphasized that Apple only issues such updates “extremely judiciously”. Any pending security updates will be installed the next time you manually update software.
I think Apple has struck a nearly perfect balance here, between doing what’s right for most users (installing these rare emergency updates automatically) and doing what’s right for power users who really do want to control when updates — even essential ones — are installed. I also think Apple is doing the right thing by going to the press and explaining when they issue such updates. If I could tweak anything, it would be to have these updates show up in the regular list of pending software updates if you have “Install system data files and security updates” turned off.
daring_fireball  apple  mac  update  security  privacy  zoom  apps  webcam  bug  hack 
july 2019 by rgl7194
What happened when MRT was updated, and what MRT does – The Eclectic Light Company
Unless your Mac has been isolated from the Internet for the last few days, or is running a very old version of OS X, it will have been updated ‘silently’ to MRT* 1.45 in that period. The next question which many users asked is whether the new version of MRT is run once it has been installed. As I wrote yesterday, opinion is that it has to be run manually unless the Mac is restarted after updating, and Apple’s advice is that a Mac should always be restarted after an update to MRT, although that advice isn’t given consistently either.
In this article, I show that is incorrect, and MRT should in fact run after such an update (as Al Varnell has reported), but that many users will still want to run MRT manually at that time. I also provide a glimpse into what MRT actually does.
mac  update  security  privacy  bug  malware 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Zoom Video Conferencing for macOS Also Vulnerable to Critical RCE Flaw
The chaos and panic that the disclosure of privacy vulnerability in the highly popular and widely-used Zoom video conferencing software created earlier this week is not over yet.
As suspected, it turns out that the core issue—a locally installed web server by the software—was not just allowing any website to turn on your device webcam, but also could allow hackers to take complete control over your Apple's Mac computer remotely.
Reportedly, the cloud-based Zoom meeting platform for macOS has also been found vulnerable to another severe flaw (CVE-2019-13567) that could allow remote attackers to execute arbitrary code on a targeted system just by convincing users into visiting an innocent looking web-page.
As explained in our previous report by Swati Khandelwal, the Zoom conferencing app contained a critical vulnerability (CVE-2019-13450) that resides in the way its click-to-join feature is implemented, which automatically turns on users' webcam when they visit an invite link.
Both vulnerabilities stem from a controversial local web server—runs on port 19421—that Zoom client installs on users' computers to offer the click-to-join feature.
apps  bug  hack  mac  privacy  security  webcam  zoom 
july 2019 by rgl7194
How to instantly share files with AirDrop for iPhone or iPad | iMore
AirDrop lets you quickly and easily transfer files between iPhones, iPads, and Macs.
Using Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy to broadcast, discover, and negotiate connections, and point-to-point Wi-Fi to transfer information AirDrop is fast, power-efficient, and secure. When you're using it between iPhones and iPads, you can AirDrop photos, videos, contacts, Passbook passes, Voice Memos, Map location, and any and everything else that appears on a Share sheet.
How to turn AirDrop on or off for iPhone or iPad
How to AirDrop files from your iPhone or iPad
How to troubleshoot AirDrop on iPhone and iPhone
How to AirDrop from your Mac
airdrop  iphone  ios  mac 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Daring Fireball: Apple Has Pushed a Silent MacOS Update to Remove Zoom's Hidden Web Server
Zack Whittaker, reporting for TechCrunch:
Apple has released a silent update for Mac users removing a vulnerable component in Zoom, the popular video conferencing app, which allowed websites to automatically add a user to a video call without their permission.
The Cupertino, Calif.-based tech giant told TechCrunch that the update — now released — removes the hidden web server, which Zoom quietly installed on users’ Macs when they installed the app.
Apple said the update does not require any user interaction and is deployed automatically.
That’s the end of that chapter. I forgot to mention the other day that the worst part about Zoom’s local web server is that if you deleted the Zoom app, the web server would silently reinstall the Zoom app if a website you visited requested it. That phrase I quoted yesterday, “nonconsensual technology”, really sums it up. I’ll go out on a limb and say Apple is none too pleased about this. I can’t think of a better example to explain why we — which is to say honest Mac users and developers — are stuck with ever-tightening sandbox restrictions on the Mac.
apple  apps  bug  hack  mac  privacy  security  update  webcam  zoom  daring_fireball 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Silent Mac update nukes dangerous webserver installed by Zoom | Ars Technica
Fix also requires users to confirm they want to join a Zoom conference.
Apple said it has pushed a silent macOS update that removes the undocumented webserver that was installed by the Zoom conferencing app for Mac.
The webserver accepts connections from any device connected to the same local network, a security researcher disclosed on Monday. The server continues to run even when a Mac user uninstalls Zoom. The researcher showed how the webserver can be abused by people on the same network to force Macs to reinstall the conferencing app. Zoom issued an emergency patch on Tuesday in response to blistering criticism from security researchers and end users.
Apple on Wednesday issued an update of its own, a company representative speaking on background told Ars. The update ensures the webserver is removed—even if users have uninstalled Zoom or haven’t installed Tuesday’s update. Apple delivered the silent update automatically, meaning there was no notification or action required of end users. The update was first reported by TechCrunch.
security  privacy  zoom  webcam  mac  bug  hack  apps  apple  update 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Apple rolls out silent update to remove Zoom web server from Macs | iMore
Apple took a proactive approach to protect Mac users.
What you need to know
Apple rolled out a silent update for Macs that removes the Zoom web server.
This is Apple's proactive approach to address the budding Zoom issue.
The update is being deployed automatically, which means users don't have to do a thing.
Apple has rolled out a silent update for Mac users that removes the Zoom web server that allowed malicious websites to access the camera without permission. Apple confirmed the update in a statement to TechCrunch.
The Cupertino, Calif.-based tech giant told TechCrunch that the update — now released — removes the hidden web server, which Zoom quietly installed on users' Macs when they installed the app.
Apple said the update does not require any user interaction and is deployed automatically.
The automatic Mac update is Apple's response to the Zoom debacle that has unfolded over the past few days. When users downloaded the Zoom app, it covertly installed a web server that turned out to be vulnerable to malicious web sites which could in turn access the Mac's camera.
After backpedaling, Zoom released an emergency patch yesterday to fix the issue but now Apple is taking a proactive approach to remove the web server from all Macs, regardless if users downloaded the patch.
security  privacy  zoom  webcam  mac  bug  hack  apps  apple  update 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Zoom saved you a click--by giving you a security hole - Six Colors
So a security reacher noticed that business videoconferencing app Zoom was doing a bunch of bad stuff that left Mac users potentially vulnerable to privacy and security breaches.
My guess is that Zoom’s original sin comes out of its corporate culture, which is focused on competing in a pretty cutthroat industry with demanding clients (IT managers) and not particularly technically literate customers (the individual business users). There’s probably a great fear of losing business to other businesses who can boast about running video meetings with ever less friction to the user.
And then Apple comes along and introduces a security feature to Safari that requires a confirmation click when any link in a web browser attempts to open an external app. Zoom, which likes to pass around web links as a way of driving users into conference calls, didn’t look at this security measure as something to help keep their customers secure—it viewed it as an addition of friction by the platform owner.
Zoom’s response was to build a secret local web server, which allowed Zoom to rewrite its hyperlinks to connect to a web server instead of an app—so the web server could bypass Safari’s security and launch the app without a second click.
security  privacy  zoom  webcam  mac  bug  hack  apps 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Zoom security flaw puts you at risk (even after you uninstall) - SecureMac
Security researcher Jonathan Leitschuh has discovered a major vulnerability in the popular Zoom video conferencing app that could allow malicious actors to turn on your Mac’s camera without your permission.
Worse yet, because of the way Zoom works on macOS, you could still be at risk even if you uninstall the app! 
So even if you haven’t used Zoom in a while (or if you can’t remember if it was ever on your computer), read on.
In this short post we’ll tell you about the vulnerability, explain its possible effects, and tell you what you can do to protect yourself.
Nice idea, poor execution
Zoom wanted to make it easy for hosts to invite participants to an online meeting—and for participants to accept and join meetings with a click. 
To accomplish this on macOS, the Zoom app installs its own web server on a user’s system so that when they click on a meeting invitation and open the link in their browser, the Zoom client is automatically launched and the meeting participant is joined to the meeting. 
Zoom also set things up so that meeting hosts could specify the default video and audio settings for participants joining the meeting—including “join with webcam enabled”.
security  privacy  zoom  webcam  mac  bug  hack  apps 
july 2019 by rgl7194
There’s A Major Security Vulnerability In Zoom’s Desktop App. The Company Said It’s A Feature, Not A Flaw.
Zoom’s video conferencing service is used by Nasdaq, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the US Department of Homeland Security, and the US Department of Energy, among others.
Video conferencing service Zoom left millions of users exposed to a security flaw that could allow attackers easy access to its users laptop cameras and microphones. The vulnerability, which allows attackers to initiate a video-enabled call on a Mac without user consent, was first reported by software engineer Jonathan Leitschuh yesterday. Leitschuh told BuzzFeed News that the attack also affects Windows users who have opened custom URLs from Zoom on Chrome browsers.
Leitschuh reported the vulnerability to Zoom in March. The company responded by releasing a fix for an unrelated flaw that would allow a hacker to trigger an endless loop of meeting requests. It left the video camera issue unaddressed.
In a blog post updated Tuesday afternoon, Zoom said it will release a patch for the vulnerability by July 11.
Earlier in the day, Zoom chief information security officer Richard Farley told BuzzFeed News that there have been no reports of the video camera access attack based on customer support records, but also admitted that “Meeting joins happen all the time. Millions a day. There isn’t really a way for us to look at the logs to determine whether that was an intentional join by the user or the user was phished into joining.”
security  privacy  zoom  webcam  mac  bug  hack  apps 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Daring Fireball: Zoom Considers Their Major Security Vulnerability a Feature, Not a Flaw
Nicole Nguyen, reporting for BuzzFeed News:
Not only did Zoom allow attackers access to the video cameras of its Mac app users, but it also left its web server running in the background, even after the user uninstalled the Zoom app. BuzzFeed News also verified that the server also reinstalled the Zoom app when a meeting link was clicked, without notifying the user, if the Zoom app had been deleted from the machine.
Saitta criticized these behaviors, saying they are “not justifiable in these cases and come with significant risk.” She recommends that people remove Zoom from their systems and refrain from using the app until the company delivers a version without that always-on web server. “This is an excellent example of what my friend Deb Chachra calls ‘nonconsensual technology,’” she told BuzzFeed News. “It’s a sadly common attitude among tech companies that what the user wants can be ignored on a whim.”
Simply outrageous.
security  privacy  zoom  webcam  mac  bug  hack  apps  daring_fireball 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Daring Fireball: Zoom Is Disturbingly Dangerous Software
Jonathan Leitschuh:
This vulnerability allows any website to forcibly join a user to a Zoom call, with their video camera activated, without the user’s permission.
On top of this, this vulnerability would have allowed any webpage to DOS (Denial of Service) a Mac by repeatedly joining a user to an invalid call.
Additionally, if you’ve ever installed the Zoom client and then uninstalled it, you still have a localhost web server on your machine that will happily re-install the Zoom client for you, without requiring any user interaction on your behalf besides visiting a webpage. This re-install ‘feature’ continues to work to this day.
Any architecture that requires a localhost web server is questionable at best. (That means every Mac with Zoom installed is running a web server.) But the fact that Zoom implemented it in a way such that the web server was still there, still running, even when you deleted the Zoom app, is morally criminal, and should be legally criminal. No one who understands how this worked could possibly have thought this was ethical. Install the app, try the app, delete the app — you expect all traces of the app to be gone. Not only did Zoom leave something behind, it left behind a web server with serious security vulnerabilities. I’m not prone to histrionics but this is genuinely outrageous — not even to mention the fact that Leitschuh reported this to Zoom months ago and Zoom effectively shrugged its corporate shoulders.
If you ever installed Zoom, I’d go through the steps to eradicate it and never install it again.
security  privacy  zoom  webcam  mac  bug  hack  apps  daring_fireball 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Zoom for Mac made it too easy for hackers to access webcams. Here’s what to do [Updated] | Ars Technica
Read this before clicking on that Web link in your bathrobe.
Update 7:23pm ET: As this post was being reported, Zoom developers reversed their previous position and issued an update that changes the contested behavior.
"Initially, we did not see the Web server or video-on posture as significant risks to our customers and, in fact, felt that these were essential to our seamless join process," Zoom's Jonathan Farley wrote. "But in hearing the outcry from our users in the past 24 hours, we have decided to make the updates to our service."
The update makes the following changes:
complete removal of the local Web server and
an addition to the menu that allows users to remove the app
Zoom developers also added new details about a previously mentioned update, which is now scheduled for Friday. It will
Automatically save first-time users' selection of the "Always turn off my video" preference and
allow returning users to update their video preferences and make video OFF by default at any time through the Zoom client settings
security  privacy  zoom  webcam  mac  bug  hack  apps 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Zoom vulnerability lets websites access your Mac's camera without permission | iMore
Run, don't walk, to update, uninstall or at the very least change your Zoom settings.
What you need to know
A major Zoom vulnerability lets malicious websites access your Mac camera without permission.
Zoom was alterted of the issues by security researcher Jonathan Leitschuh back in March but did not roll out a fix.
After heavy backlash, Zoom has now rolled out an emergency patch to fix the issue.
Video conferencing app Zoom is yet the latest service to be hit with a major vulnerability that puts its users at risk. The zero-day vulnerability affecting Zoom lets websites access a Mac's camera without asking for permission.
The security issue was first discovered by Jonathan Leitschuh:
A vulnerability in the Mac Zoom Client allows any malicious website to enable your camera without your permission. The flaw potentially exposes up to 750,000 companies around the world that use Zoom to conduct day-to-day business.
In a Medium post, he outlined the issue and confirmed he related the issue to Zoom back in March but the company did little effort to curtail the security threat. What made the issue worse was that even if you uninstalled the app, the local host web server was still inside your machine, which could still be access by malicious websites.
After news broke, Zoom continued to ignore the issue with a tepid response that was nonchalant. It wasn't until its response was heavily criticized that Zoom jumped to action and rolled out an emergency security patch to fix the issue on July 9. The security patch is now live and can be downloaded through Zoom's site.
security  privacy  zoom  webcam  mac  bug  hack  apps 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Zoom Zero Day: 4+ Million Webcams & maybe an RCE? Just get them to visit your website!
A vulnerability in the Mac Zoom Client allows any malicious website to enable your camera without your permission. The flaw potentially exposes up to 750,000 companies around the world that use Zoom to conduct day-to-day business.
CVE-Numbers
DOS Vulnerability — Fixed in Client version 4.4.2 — CVE-2019–13449
Information Disclosure (Webcam) — Unpatched —CVE-2019–13450
Foreword
This vulnerability allows any website to forcibly join a user to a Zoom call, with their video camera activated, without the user's permission.
On top of this, this vulnerability would have allowed any webpage to DOS (Denial of Service) a Mac by repeatedly joining a user to an invalid call.
Additionally, if you’ve ever installed the Zoom client and then uninstalled it, you still have a localhost web server on your machine that will happily re-install the Zoom client for you, without requiring any user interaction on your behalf besides visiting a webpage. This re-install ‘feature’ continues to work to this day.
Yep, no joke.
This vulnerability leverages the amazingly simple Zoom feature where you can just send anyone a meeting link (for example https://zoom.us/j/492468757) and when they open that link in their browser their Zoom client is magically opened on their local machine. I was curious about how this amazing bit of functionality was implemented and how it had been implemented securely. Come to find out, it really hadn’t been implemented securely. Nor can I figure out a good way to do this that doesn’t require an additional bit of user interaction to be secure.
security  privacy  zoom  webcam  mac  bug  hack  apps 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Zoom videoconferencing app contains major vulnerability - Six Colors
By now you’ve probably seen mention of this security hole, but it’s worth checking out the blog post from Jonathan Leitschuh, the researcher who uncovered it. It’s a fairly technical piece, but here’s the crux:
The local client Zoom web server is running as a background process, so to exploit this, a user doesn’t even need to be “running” (in the traditional sense) the Zoom app to be vulnerable.
All a website would need to do is embed the above in their website and any Zoom user will be instantly connected with their video running. This is still true today!
Yeah, this is pretty bad. It’s a classic example of Malcolm’s Maxim. There’s always a balance between convenience and security, but this has dipped over the line to the former, which has compromised the latter.
Any time your answer to removing obstacles for users involves installing a silent webserver with an undocumented API that persists even if users uninstall the app in question, well, maybe rethink that.
In the meantime, if you’re looking to mitigate the possibility for this loophole being exploited, the above post has a couple of solutions, ranging from the simple to the more technical. Zoom, for its part, has defended its behavior saying that it’s “a legitimate solution to a poor user experience problem.”
security  privacy  zoom  webcam  mac  bug  hack  apps 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Flaw in Zoom Video Conferencing Software Lets Websites Hijack Mac Webcams
If you use Zoom video conferencing software on your Mac computer—then beware—any website you're visiting in your web browser can turn on your device camera without your permission.
Ironically, even if you had ever installed the Zoom client on your device and simply uninstalled it, a remote attacker can still activate your webcam.
Zoom is one of the most popular cloud-based meeting platforms that provide video, audio, and screen sharing options to users, allowing them to host webinars, teach online courses, conduct online training, or join virtual meetings online.
security  privacy  zoom  webcam  mac  bug  hack  apps 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Sonarr - Dive in
I am a PVR for newsgroup and torrent users. I watch for new episodes of your favorite shows to download, sort and rename.
Smart PVR for newsgroup and bittorrent users.
apps  bittorrent  download  linux  mac  tv  usenet  windows 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Sonarr: An App That Downloads TV Shows Automatically - GreyCoder
Sonarr is a free app that allows you to automatically download TV shows from around the world.
This is a reliable application that runs as a service on your machine. The user interface has a slight learning curve, but once Sonarr is set up correctly, you will not need to use the interface that often.
To use Sonarr, you select the TV series that you wish to download.
Sonarr will then scan for new episodes of your selected TV shows. If a new episode is available, it will download that episode automatically via Usenet or torrent.
Sonarr also makes it easy to download entire TV shows seasons. You can click on any season, and Sonarr will download all available episodes at once.
Sonarr works in tandem with a Usenet download client or a torrent client. I recommend using it with SabNZBd.
Sonarr is available for Linux, Windows and MacOS.
Radarr is another application similar to Sonarr. It is for tracking movies instead of TV shows.
tv  movies  download  apps  mac  windows  linux  usenet  bittorrent 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Mac Power Users #490: Surfin' with Safari - Relay FM
July 7th, 2019 · 82 minutes
Safari isn't the most popular browser on the planet, but its focus on speed, security and privacy set it apart from the competition. This week, David and Stephen get into the pros and cons of the application, and some of its unique features.
LINKS AND SHOW NOTES
Safari - Apple
Safari - Apple Developer
Safari (web browser) - Wikipedia
Macworld Boston 1997 - The Microsoft Deal - YouTube
Apple Unveils Safari - Apple Newsroom
Macworld San Francisco 2003 - Safari Web Browser Introduction - YouTube
Alfred - Productivity App for macOS
Before the App Store: the “Sweet Solution” of Web Apps and Developers’ Relentless Passion – MacStories
Download iCloud for Windows - Apple Support
‎Safari Extensions: App Store
Ghostery Makes the Web Cleaner, Faster and Safer!
Grammarly: Free Writing Assistant
‎Dark Mode for Safari on the Mac App Store
1Blocker - Fast & Secure Content Blocker for iPhone, iPad and Mac
Safari Content Blocker Evaluations – The Brooks Review
StatCounter Global Browser Stats
Google Chrome - The Fast, Simple and Secure Browser from Google
Secure, Fast & Private Web Browser with Adblocker | Brave Browser
The new, fast browser for Mac, PC and Linux | Firefox
iCab - The Taxi for the Internet
Privacy, simplified. — DuckDuckGo Browser Extension & Mobile App
Camino (web browser) - Wikipedia
OmniWeb - Wikipedia
MPU Talk
podcast  MPU  safari  mac 
july 2019 by rgl7194
Bruji News » Blog Archive » Pedias 6.0
With the release of 6.0 the age of the big cats has come to an end. From now on Pedias will run on MacOS Sierra and beyond. I know we are way behind in catching up to Apple and dropping support for yesteryear’s OS, but we like to keep compatibility as long as possible. Yet the future doesn’t stop and we were spending half our time fighting Xcode to support the older MacOS.
Version 6.0 sports a whole new core, thoroughly tested for several months by our dedicated beta testers. Thank you so much to everybody that downloaded the beta and has been helping out. 6.0 is a faster and more robust program yet with the same interface you love. Changes in interface, Dark Mode and a few adjustments for Mojave users coming soon.
The really good news, 6.0 is a free upgrade to all 5.0 Pedia users. I want everybody who has access to new hardware and the latest MacOS to be able to enjoy the best that the Pedias have to offer in terms of stability and future updates. It does mean that updates on version 5.7 effectively cease today but will be available for download for all those with older MacOS versions.
Up next, resurrecting Spotlight for Mojave and Dark Mode. As usual if you run into any issues or have suggestions on the latest version don’t hesitate to write us an email with feedback.
mac  apps  organizing  cd  dvd  books  games  hot_wheels 
june 2019 by rgl7194
Alfred 4 for Mac
If you want to spend more time typing on your keyboard and less time fiddling with your mouse, I highly recommend Alfred as a file navigator and replacement for Spotlight.1 The latest Alfred update brings some minor improvements like placeholder variables for text expansion, new workflow actions, and some better file handling options.
I'm not even really into building Alfred workflows and I still think it's worth the money. I mostly use Keyboard Maestro for complex workflows on the Mac but if you want to build your own tricks in Alfred, it's pretty easy. I recommend practicing the file navigation with Alfred. Give it a week or two and you will never go back to the hunt and peck mouse navigation of the Mac Finder. It's just so much faster to start typing a folder or file name and jump right to that location. Then use the Alfred buffer stack up files to manipulate all at once.
To get started, it's easy to integrate Alfred into your normal Finder process. If you're browsing in the Finder you can send the current selection right to Alfred and then trigger an action from there.
mac  utilities  keyboard  automation  workflow  search 
june 2019 by rgl7194
Answers to your burning questions about how ‘Sign In with Apple’ works | TechCrunch
One of the bigger security announcements from Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference this week is Apple’s new requirement that app developers must implement the company’s new single sign-on solution, Sign In with Apple, wherever they already offer another third-party sign-on system.
Apple’s decision to require its button in those scenarios is considered risky — especially at a time when the company is in the crosshairs of the U.S. Department of Justice over antitrust concerns. Apple’s position on the matter is that it wants to give its customers a more private choice.
From a security perspective, Apple offers a better option for both users and developers alike compared with other social login systems which, in the past, have been afflicted by massive security and privacy breaches.
Apple’s system also ships with features that benefit iOS app developers — like built-in two-factor authentication support, anti-fraud detection and the ability to offer a one-touch, frictionless means of entry into their app, among other things.
For consumers, they get the same fast sign-up and login as with other services, but with the knowledge that the apps aren’t sharing their information with an entity they don’t trust.
Consumers can also choose whether or not to share their email with the app developer.
apple  privacy  security  mac  ios  SSO  faq 
june 2019 by rgl7194
All the Little Details of How ‘Sign In with Apple’ Works
Sarah Perez of TechCrunch has assembled an excellent, in-depth walkthrough answering key questions about how Apple’s upcoming authentication service, Sign In with Apple, will work:
From a security perspective, Apple offers a better option for both users and developers alike compared with other social login systems which, in the past, have been afflicted by massive security and privacy breaches.
Apple’s system also ships with features that benefit iOS app developers — like built-in two-factor authentication support, anti-fraud detection and the ability to offer a one-touch, frictionless means of entry into their app, among other things.
[...]
Despite the advantages to the system, the news left many wondering how the new Sign In with Apple button would work, in practice, at a more detailed level. We’ve tried to answer some of the more burning and common questions.
Perez addresses questions regarding what information a developer receives when a user chooses Sign In with Apple, whether it’s possible to use the authentication service on Android devices, when an app will and won’t be required to use Sign In with Apple, and more.
Despite some controversy regarding how strongly Apple is pushing this new secure login option, if it works as advertised, Sign In with Apple could be one of the upcoming OS features that has the biggest societal impact in the long run.
apple  privacy  security  mac  ios  SSO  faq 
june 2019 by rgl7194
Apple Launches Privacy-Focused 'Sign in with Apple ID' Feature at WWDC 2019
Just like 'login with Google,' 'login with Facebook,' Twitter, LinkedIn or any other social media site, you would now be able to quickly sign-up and log into third-party websites and apps using your Apple ID.
What's the difference? Well, Apple claims that signing-in with Apple ID would protect users' privacy by not disclosing their actual email addresses to the 3rd-party services and also limiting personal information to the minimum necessary data.
While announcing 'Sign in with Apple' today at WWDC, the company revealed that the feature has been designed to randomly generate a new unique email address for each different service a user sign-up with, and will forward all emails to your primary email ID, internally.
apple  privacy  security  mac  ios  SSO 
june 2019 by rgl7194
How 'Sign In with Apple' works in iOS 13, iPadOS 13, and macOS Catalina
This fall, you can use an encrypted, throw-away email address to sign up for and sign into services you don't want to share that information with. Here's how it works.
We've all been there. You download a new app that everyone is talking about and the first thing that happens is it asks for your email address to sign you up for an account. You don't even know whether you want this app yet. You were hoping to just check it out first.
Deleted.
No one wants to risk having their email address sold to a third-party marketing company, or worse, stolen by hackers. If we don't yet trust an app developer, we're much less likely to give them this personal information right up front. You have to win us over first. Let us get to know you.
With Sign In with Apple, coming in iOS 13, iPadOS 13, and macOS Catalina, you'll be able to use an encrypted "burner" email address (if you will) to sign up for and into services that support third-party sign-on services.
At Apple's WWDC 2019 Designing for Privacy session, we learned some details on how this all works.
apple  privacy  security  mac  ios  SSO 
june 2019 by rgl7194
All the known details of Sign In with Apple - Six Colors
TechCrunch’s Sarah Perez runs down all that’s currently known about the Sign In with Apple system announced at WWDC last week. The biggest question seems to be whether or not this will attract the attention of regulators who are already looking at big tech companies, including Apple. But, from a user perspective, it’s hard not to argue this is great.
It’s also a strategically brilliant move by Apple, as I mentioned in my Macworld column last week: every time someone logs in with Apple’s service as opposed to, say, Facebook’s or Google’s, those companies lose out on your valuable personal information. That’s a pretty big blow for them, especially if it starts to happen in large volumes.
apple  privacy  security  mac  ios  SSO  faq 
june 2019 by rgl7194
Daring Fireball: Apple Support: 'How to Enable Full Mitigation for Microarchitectural Data Sampling (MDS) Vulnerabilities'
Apple Support:
Intel has disclosed vulnerabilities called Microarchitectural Data Sampling (MDS) that apply to desktop and notebook computers with Intel CPUs, including all modern Mac computers.
Although there are no known exploits affecting customers at the time of this writing, customers who believe their computer is at heightened risk of attack can use the Terminal app to enable an additional CPU instruction and disable hyper-threading processing technology, which provides full protection from these security issues.
This option is available for macOS Mojave, High Sierra and Sierra and may have a significant impact on the performance of your computer. […] Testing conducted by Apple in May 2019 showed as much as a 40 percent reduction in performance with tests that include multithreaded workloads and public benchmarks.
It’s good that there are no known exploits using these techniques, but even if there were, the overwhelming majority of Mac users — almost everyone — would not need to enable this mitigation. These MDS vulnerabilities enable malware on your computer to do bad things. But these vulnerabilities are not ways for malware to get onto your computer.
Once you have malware on your computer, the game is over. I’m not saying these MDS vulnerabilities aren’t a problem — they obviously are, because they make malware potentially more dangerous. But the game is keeping malware off your computers in the first place.
(Also worth noting: these particular vulnerabilities don’t affect iPhones, iPads, Apple Watches, or the vast majority of Android devices because ARM chips don’t have these vulnerabilities. Only Intel chips. We’re running out of reasons for Apple not to switch the entire Mac platform to ARM.)
(BONUS PARENTHETICAL: It’s possible that there are similar vulnerabilities in ARM chips too, but if there are, none have been publicly disclosed yet.)
apple  support  security  privacy  cpu  mac  bug  malware 
june 2019 by rgl7194
The Best RSS Reader for Mac (Updated for 2019 and Reeder 4)
Our Pick: Reeder is the Best RSS Reader for Mac
The best RSS reader for Mac is Reeder 4.
Reeder should be a familiar name to iOS users. In fact, when the Mac app first launched in 2011, it was a port from iOS to the Mac. Here’s Federico Viticci in his review of the original app:
Whilst Reeder for iOS and Reeder for Mac are the same app as far as the main concept goes (quickly fetch unread items for Google Reader, skim through them easily, provide features to do anything you want with RSS feeds), Reeder on macOS is obviously more “powerful” when you take in consideration the keyboard support, the subscription management, or the simple fact that links can be opened in the background in your desktop browser. For as much as people have criticized Reeder for Mac for being the start of an evil trend that will see iOS apps coming to the desktop (good luck with that), the undeniable truth is that Reeder is a Mac app, with all the evident advantages and limitations that come with it.
While the app we have today has seen a lot of improvements and changes in the years since launch, the fundamental experience of using Reeder has remained: it’s a fast and fluid way to blast through RSS feeds on the Mac.
mac  RSS  apps  comparo  review  reading 
may 2019 by rgl7194
Real-time satellite imagery on your desktop with Downlink - Main Engine Cut Off
My worlds collide: I built a Mac app using near real-time imagery from GOES-East, GOES-West, and Himawari-8.
It’s called Downlink and you can get it today (free!) on the Mac App Store.
While browsing the GOES Image Viewer a few months ago, I had an idea: with the data frequency that these new GOES satellites provide, I could build a Mac app that pulls the newest image every 20 minutes and sets it as your desktop background.
What resulted was a simple little menu bar app that gives you a near real-time view of Earth all day long. I’ve been using it for a few weeks as I’ve built it, and it is an absolute joy to have a window to Earth all day.
There are 8 different views of Earth to choose from in the first version of the app, including full disk images from GOES-East, GOES-West, and Himawari-8 (which happens to have a nearly identical imager). Real time views of Earth (and other planets) are only going to get more popular, so the idea is to keep the app updated with the newest image sources in the future.
Head over to the Mac App Store, get Downlink for free, and let me know what you think!
photography  mac  earth  apps 
may 2019 by rgl7194
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