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robertogreco : 1966   11

Everyday life in bygone days in Tokyo, 1966 昭和東京 - YouTube
"A German camera crew filmed this record of family life in Tokyo 45 years ago. The children go off to school and father works in the factory. It was the start of the industrial boom in the so-called Showa time. Labour was still cheap. TV sets were hand soldered. Many parts were still manufactured in small home industries. Finally the family gathers again in their tiny homes. Futons behind the wall doors. A time Japanese are still nostalgic about."
japan  tokyo  srg  1966  video 
october 2018 by robertogreco
polypops cardboard toys
"Originally commissioned in 1966 as a two year design / research project for the
Reed Paper Group to explore new ideas and uses for corrugated cardboard.
Roger Limbrick designed a series of children's large action toys, Stephen Bartlett furniture, and Clifford Richard created the packaging graphics."

[via: https://twitter.com/tealtan/status/953760902209245185
https://twitter.com/tealtan/status/953764743109599232 ]
cardboard  classideas  via:tealtan  rogerlimbrick  1960s  1966  stephenbartlett  cliffordrichard  polypops 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Introduction to the #Blackpanthersyllabus
"Beyoncé’s new song, “Formation” and her recent performance at the Super Bowl 50 halftime show has ignited a storm of controversy over the past few weeks. Much of the critique of Beyoncé’s performance reveals a general misunderstanding of the history of the Black Panther Party (BPP) and the Black Power movement in general. Critics continue to draw comparisons between the BPP and the Ku Klux Klan (KKK), erroneously equating black nationalism with white supremacy. Established by college students Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale in Oakland, California in 1966, the BPP (originally the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense) was the largest and arguably most influential black revolutionary organization of the twentieth century. During the late 1960s–a period marred by the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, urban unrest, and unrelenting police violence–thousands of young black men and women joined the BPP, dedicating their lives to protecting black communities and combating police brutality.

The recent PBS airing of Stanley Nelson’s The Black Panthers: Vanguard of a Revolution, which coincided with the Party’s 50 year anniversary, has reignited public interest in the Black Panthers and the Black Power movement. The Black Panthers is the first feature-length documentary to highlight the historical significance of the Black Panther Party, offering a more complex and nuanced view of the Party beyond the images that tend to occupy the popular imagination. Although The Black Panthers sheds light on the historical significance and legacy of the Party, the documentary certainly does not–and could not in only 2 hours–tell the entire story. For this reason, we encourage everyone to read some of the recommended texts below to further enhance their understanding of the BPP and the significance of Black Power as a national and global political, cultural, and economic movement. Understanding the history of the BPP sheds light on contemporary black politics including the continuing struggle against urban police brutality.

In the spirit of #Charlestonsyllabus, Dara Vance (@divafancypants), a PhD candidate in History at the University of Kentucky, expressed the need to create the #blackpanthersyllabus to better contextualize the history of the Black Panthers and offer nuanced perspectives on Black Power. With the help of Shawn Leigh Alexander (@S_L_Alexander), Robyn Spencer (@racewomanist), Shannon Hanks ( from The Black Scholar) and other several scholars on Twitter, Dara and I began compiling the list and soliciting reading suggestions using the hashtag. AAIHS blogger Ashley Farmer (@drashleyfarmer), a historian of Black Power, selected the final texts and organized the readings based on key themes and subfields. Special thanks to everyone on Twitter who contributed suggestions. Please be sure to view #blackpanthersyllabus for additional reading suggestions and resources."
history  us  blackpanthers  blackpantherparty  syllabus  daravance  2016  race  blackpower  shawnleighalexander  robynspencer  shannonhanks  keishablain  politics  culture  blackculture  economics  stanleynelson  resistance  revolution  1960s  hueynewton  bobbyseale  oakland  1966  syllabi 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Black Books- The Story of Britain's First Black Bookshop on Vimeo
"This film delves into the radical history of Britain's first black bookshop which was founded by John La Rose and Sarah White in 1966. As well as creating a much needed space for black communities to access and publish their own literature, it helped support important campaigns such as the Caribbean Artists Movement, the Black Parents Movement as well as playing a pivotal role in the historic Black Peoples Day of Action.

Decades on, 'New Beacon Books' is still a functioning bookshop but in a world of Amazon and Kindles can it really survive forever?"
britain  uk  2014  documentary  booksellers  bookshops  1966  johnlarose  sarahwhite  activism  politics  lcproject  publishing  openstudioproject  optimism  1960s  change  arwaaburawa  bookstores 
may 2015 by robertogreco
high tension : architecture : project for city hall : california city : 1966 : konrad wachsmann | openhouse
"I so wish konrad wachsmann could have realized this project. city hall for california city, 1966. the roof is entirely suspended by high-tension steel cables anchored in sloped embankments on either side. no vertical supports whatsoever! but also no facades! (this is california!) hence the wind can pass underneath the roof which prevents the space heating up by the sun. the wind passing through provides perfect cross-ventilation and makes mechanical air-conditioning obsolete. and as the usable space underneath is dug out from the natural ground, the constant moderate temperature of the ground additionally cools the space."
1966  architecture  design  californiacity  konradwachsmann 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Day of Affirmation speech - Wikipedia
"First is the danger of futility; the belief there is nothing one man or one woman can do against the enormous array of the world's ills -- against misery, against ignorance, or injustice and violence. …

The second danger is that of expediency; of those who say that hopes and beliefs must bend before immediate necessities. Of course if we must act effectively we must deal with the world as it is. We must get things done. But if there was one thing that President Kennedy stood for that touched the most profound feeling of young people across the world, it was the belief that idealism, high aspiration, and deep convictions are not incompatible with the most practical and efficient of programs -- that there is no basic inconsistency between ideals and realistic possibilities -- no separation between the deepest desires of heart and of mind and the rational application of human effort to human problems. …

A third danger is timidity. Few men are willing to brave the disapproval of their fellows, the censure of their colleagues, the wrath of their society. Moral courage is a rarer commodity than bravery in battle or great intelligence. …

For the fortunate amongst us, the fourth danger is comfort; the temptation to follow the easy and familiar path of personal ambition and financial success so grandly spread before those who have the privilege of an education. …"
futility  timidity  robertfkennedy  expediency  comfort  1966  steppingout  comfortzone  yearoff  change  courage  agency  society  youth  revolution  moralcourage 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Eugenio Carmi: The Bomb and The General (by Umberto Eco) - a set on Flickr
"Umberto Eco (b. 1932) is a novelist, semiotician, philosopher, and literary critic most famous for his novel The Name of the Rose (1980). Along with artist Eugenio Carmi, Eco has published three picture books, the first of which is The Bomb and the General, published in Italy in 1966, and then revised and reissued in 1988, at which time it was translated into English by William Weaver.

For more information on Umberto Eco's children's books, visit my blog:

http://wetoowerechildren.blogspot.com/2012/02/umberto-eco-bomb-and-general.html "
williamweaver  1966  flickr  childrenliterature  books  umbertoeco 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Next month, as part of Helsinki’s status as Design... - Mrs Tsk *
"Next month, as part of Helsinki’s status as Design Capital 2012, Marimekko launches a series of guerilla recreations—across Helsinki & online—of the Mari Village, a utopian project (& money sink) started in 1962 by Armi Ratia, the firm’s tough-yet-visionary founder.

Marimekko’s own PR about what this will involve is vague, & doesn’t show any images of the original site, developed in collaboration with the architect Aarno Ruusuvuori. The company certainly doesn’t go into the doubts Armi Ratia had about the village—originally planned to house 3500 inhabitants—or the reasons the plug was pulled in 1966.

My interest piqued by passing references by my friend Jenna Sutela and others, I’ve had to scour obscure PDFs to find the fullest account of the Mari Village, or Marikylä, with its experimental homes. Here’s a series of screenshots of Juhani Pallasmaa’s essay—published in Capitel Art in 1985—The Last Utopia, some images of the Marimekko Sauna System…"
nenetsuboi  history  marimekkosaunasystem  aarnoruusuvuori  helsinki  design  utopia  1985  1966  juhanipallasmaa  marimekko  jennasutela  momus  imomus  finland  armiratia  1962 
february 2012 by robertogreco
The Bomb and the General: A Vintage Semiotic Children's Book by Umberto Eco | Brain Pickings
"Novelist and philosopher Umberto Eco once said that the list is the origin of culture. But his fascination with lists and organization grew out of his longtime love affair with semiotics, the study of signs and symbols as an anthropological sensemaking mechanism for the world. In bridging semiotics with literature, Eco proposed a dichotomy of “open texts,” which allow multiple interpretations, and “closed texts,” defined by a single possible interpretation. Since semiotics is so closely related to language, one of its central inquiries deals with language acquisition — when, why, and how children begin to associate objects with the words that designate those objects. Most children’s picture books, with their simple messages and unequivocal moral lessons, fall within the category of “closed texts.”

In 1966, Eco published The Bomb and the General — a children’s book that, unlike the “open texts” of his adult novels with their infinite interpretations, followed the “closed text” format…
closedtexts  opentexts  thebombandthegeneral  1966  books  umbertoeco  semiotics 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 39, Jorge Luis Borges
Too much to choose, but here's one interesting bit: "Now as for the color yellow, there is a physical explanation of that. When I began to lose my sight, the last color I saw, or the last color, rather, that stood out, because of course now I know that your coat is not the same color as this table or of the woodwork behind you—the last color to stand out was yellow because it is the most vivid of colors. That's why you have the Yellow Cab Company in the United States. At first they thought of making the cars scarlet. Then somebody found out that at night or when there was a fog that yellow stood out in a more vivid way than scarlet. So you have yellow cabs because anybody can pick them out. Now when I began to lose my eyesight, when the world began to fade away from me, there was a time among my friends . . . well they made, they poked fun at me because I was always wearing yellow neckties. Then they thought I really liked yellow, although it really was too glaring."
borges  interview  literature  writing  fiction  parisreview  1966  film  language  books  numbers  religion  colors  words  languages  oldnorse  metaphor  georgeeliot  childhood  robertlouisstevenson  treasureisland  marktwain  tomsawyer  huckleberryfinn  milongas  adolfobioycásares  rudyardkipling  kafka  henryjames  waltwhitman  carlsandburg  poetry  josephconrad  argentina  buenosaires  tseliot 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Colin Ward, Anarchism as a Theory of Organization (1966)
"This is a remarkable text that shows the affinities between anarchy and the principles of organization of complex systems composed by many interconnected units. Perhaps, only when a mechanical worldview will be replaced by a cybernetic one, anarchy as organization will be finally recognized and accepted, probably under a different name."
anarchism  politics  anarchy  theory  organization  organizations  hierarchy  colinward  cyberspace  web  internet  digital  1966  government  authority  leadership  society  administration  institutions  deinstitutionalization  lcproject  deschooling  unschooling 
january 2011 by robertogreco

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