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robertogreco : 2001   38

Bodied | NGV
"These are not silly questions as much as it is silly to ask any question of whiteness. Wherever you and I are in space and time, see my hand wrist-deep inside my body, rooting around for the part of me that would stand in front of an Indiana courthouse and throb for Mike and not for myself, that would call that woman a liar. I would have to tear at that part roughly again and again, although I would like to excise it cleanly. My fantasy is its muffled thud into the tin of a medical bowl: a bloody fibroid, veiny womb-muscle, attached to nothing, growing entirely out of place."
2018  dericashileds  missyelliott  anitahill  desireewashington  billclinton  ronaldreagan  bodies  race  gender  clarencethomas  1997  1991  miketyson  1995  1992  music  hiphop  1993  2001  welfare  lindataylor  1996  saidyahartman  liberalism  us  exclusion  marginalization  citicalracetheory  abuse  hortensespillers  economics  politics  policy  racism  sexism  feminism  body 
january 2018 by robertogreco
The Great War of the Californias : Sandow Birk
"A series of artworks depicting an imaginary war between San Francisco and Los Angeles, incorporating more than 120 artworks, including paintings, drawings, prints, faux war posters, maps, diagrams, models, and video documentary.

The project was exhibited at the Laguna Art Museum in Southern California in 2000,
and at the Sonoma Art Museum in Northern California in 2001.

A 45 min. documentary film about the war, inspired by Ken Burns' PBS series "The Civil War", was completed in 2001 and is now available. It was directed by Sean Meredith and made in collaboration with Paul Zaloom."
sanfrancisco  california  art  americanwest  losangeles  2000  2001  sandowbirk  paulzaloom  seanmeredith 
december 2017 by robertogreco
Lingua Franca - February 2001 | Cover Story: The Ex-Cons
"The only thing that arouses Luttwak's ire more than untrammeled capitalism is its elite enthusiasts—the intellectuals, politicians, policy makers, and businessmen who claim that "just because the market is always more efficient, the market should always rule." Alan Greenspan earns Luttwak's special contempt: "Alan Greenspan is a Spencerian. That makes him an economic fascist." Spencerians like Greenspan believe that "the harshest economic pressures" will "stimulate some people to...economically heroic deeds. They will become great entrepreneurs or whatever else, and as for the ones who fail, let them fail." Luttwak's other b'te noire is "Chainsaw Al" Dunlap, the peripatetic CEO who reaps unimaginable returns for corporate shareholders by firing substantial numbers of employees from companies. "Chainsaw does it," says Luttwak, referring to Dunlap's downsizing measures, "because he's simpleminded, harsh, and cruel." It's just "economic sadism." Against Greenspan and Dunlap, Luttwak affirms, "I believe that one ought to have only as much market efficiency as one needs, because everything that we value in human life is within the realm of inefficiency—love, family, attachment, community, culture, old habits, comfortable old shoes.""



"Although Luttwak writes in his 1999 book Turbo-Capitalism, "I deeply believe...in the virtues of capitalism," his opposition to the spread of market values is so acute that it puts him on the far end of today's political spectrum—a position that Luttwak congenitally enjoys. "Edward is a very perverse guy, intellectually and in many other ways," says former Commentary editor Norman Podhoretz, one of Luttwak's early champions during the 1970s. "He's a contrarian. He enjoys confounding expectations. But I frankly don't even know how serious he is in this latest incarnation." Luttwak insists that he is quite serious. He calls for socialized medicine. He advocates a strong welfare state, claiming, "If I had my druthers, I would prohibit any form of domestic charity." Charity is a "cop-out," he says: It takes dignity away from the poor."

[via: https://twitter.com/jonathanshainin/status/907983419413381120
via: https://twitter.com/camerontw/status/908176042182950914 ]

[from the responses to the tweet above:

"reminds me of kurt vonnegut on buying an envelope"
https://twitter.com/okay_dc/status/907991703184912386

"[When Vonnegut tells his wife he's going out to buy an envelope] Oh, she says, well, you're not a poor man. You know, why don't you go online and buy a hundred envelopes and put them in the closet? And so I pretend not to hear her. And go out to get an envelope because I'm going to have a hell of a good time in the process of buying one envelope. I meet a lot of people. And, see some great looking babes. And a fire engine goes by. And I give them the thumbs up. And, and ask a woman what kind of dog that is. And, and I don't know. The moral of the story is, is we're here on Earth to fart around. And, of course, the computers will do us out of that. And, what the computer people don't realize, or they don't care, is we're dancing animals. You know, we love to move around. And, we're not supposed to dance at all anymore."

http://blog.garrytan.com/kurt-vonnegut-goes-to-buy-an-envelope-profund
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9299135 ]

[also from the responses:

"Excellent. Nicholas Carr http://www.roughtype.com/?p=4708 "
https://twitter.com/BrianSJ3/status/908022365128462337

"Pichai doesn’t seem able to comprehend that the essence, and the joy, of parenting may actually lie in all the small, trivial gestures that parents make on behalf of or in concert with their kids — like picking out a song to play in the car. Intimacy is redefined as inefficiency."
http://www.roughtype.com/?p=4708 ]

[Cf: "The automated island"
http://crapfutures.tumblr.com/post/161539196134/the-automated-island

"In his frankly curmudgeonly but still insightful essay ‘Why I am Not Going to Buy a Computer’ (1987), Wendell Berry lays out his ‘standards for technological innovation’. There are nine points, and in the third point Berry states that the new device or system ‘should do work that is clearly and demonstrably better’ than the old one. This seems obvious and not too much to ask of a technology, but how well does the automated entrance at Ponta Gorda fulfill that claim?

Berry also has a point, the last in his list, about not replacing or disrupting ‘anything good that already exists’. This includes relationships between people. In other words, solve actual problems - rather than finding just any old place to put a piece of technology you want to sell. Even if the scanners at Ponta Gorda did work, how would eliminating the one human being who is employed to welcome visitors and answer questions improve the system? In Berry’s words, ‘what would be superseded would be not only something, but somebody’. The person who works there is a ‘good that already exists’, a human relationship that should be preserved, especially when her removal from a job would be bought at so little gain."]
2001  efficiency  capitalism  policy  politics  alangreenspan  edwardluttwak  freemarkets  humans  humanism  love  family  attachment  community  culture  canon  inefficiency  economics  slow  small  coreyrobin  charity  poverty  markets  welfarestate  dignity  normanpodhoretz  karlmarx  marxism  johngray  conservatism  thatcherism  ronaldreagan  elitism  kurtvonnegut  nicholascarr  parenting 
september 2017 by robertogreco
California Today: A Chronicler of the State, in His Own Words - The New York Times
"Here are just a few highlights from Mr. Starr’s prose and interviews:

On recurring natural disasters (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 31, 1993)
Southern California has used technology to materialize an imagined society of garden cities and suburbs. Now and then, it must pay a price for its reordering of the environment.

On diversity (San Diego Union-Tribune, Sept. 10, 2000):
Is there any people on the planet, any language, any religion not represented in California this very morning? ... This diversity, then, is the persistent DNA code of California.

On California’s rising Latino population (New York Times, March 31, 2001):
The Anglo hegemony was only an intermittent phase in California’s arc of identity, extending from the arrival of the Spanish.

On the Central Valley (“Coast of Dreams,” 2004):
Mesopotamia, the rice fields of China, the Po Valley: the Central Valley stood in a long line of irrigation cultures which had, in turn, given birth to civilization itself.

On California at the millennium (“California: A History,” 2005):
California had long since become one of the prisms through which the American people, for better and for worse, could glimpse their future.

On the drought (The New York Times, April 4, 2005):
Mother Nature didn’t intend for 40 million people to live here.

On the Golden Gate Bridge (“Golden Gate,” 2010):
Like the Parthenon, the Golden Gate Bridge seems Platonic in its perfection, as if the harmonies and resolutions of creation as understood by mathematics and abstract thought have been effortlessly materialized through engineering design.
"
kevinstarr  california  diversity  socal  demographics  technology  history  identity  2017  2010  2005  2004  2001  2000  1993  drought  environment  goldengatebridge  engineering  infrastructure  mesopotamia  irrigation  civilization  society  latinos  future 
january 2017 by robertogreco
The Spectre of Hope
"Over the past 30 years Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado's work has won every major award for excellence. His photographs have had an actual impact on the world and how it is seen, bringing conditions of famine and poverty to public attention in a profound and arresting way.

John Berger is one of the world's leading critics of art and photography. An artist himself, he is perhaps best known for "Ways of Seeing," his seminal book and BBC series on art criticism.

In THE SPECTRE OF HOPE, Sebastião Salgado joins Berger to pore over Salgado's collection "Migrations." Six years and 43 countries in the making (ranging across Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America), "Migrations" contains photographs of people pushed from their homes and traditions to cities and their margins—slums and streets and refugee camps.

Sitting at the kitchen table of Berger's home in Quincy, a village in the Swiss Alps, their intimate conversation, intercut with photographs from "Migrations," combines a discussion of Salgado's work with a critique of globalization, and a wide-ranging investigation of the power of the image."

[See also:
https://www.macfound.org/documentaryfilm/151/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsqlwmoME9k ]
sebastiãosalgado  johnberger  toatch  film  migrations  photography  hope  2001 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Where Has All the Education Gone?
"Cross‐national data show no association between increases in human capital attributable to the rising educational attainment of the labor force and the rate of growth of output per worker. This implies that the association of educational capital growth with conventional measures of total factor production is large, strongly statistically significant, and negative. These are “on average” results, derived from imposing a constant coefficient. However, the development impact of education varied widely across countries and has fallen short of expectations for three possible reasons. First, the institutional/governance environment could have been sufficiently perverse that the accumulation of educational capital lowered economic growth. Second, marginal returns to education could have fallen rapidly as the supply of educated labor expanded while demand remained stagnant. Third, educational quality could have been so low that years of schooling created no human capital. The extent and mix of these three phenomena vary from country to country in explaining the actual economic impact of education, or the lack thereof."

[See also: http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/education-economic-growth-by-ricardo-hausmann-2015-05 ]
economics  education  humancapital  schooling  2001  lantpritchett 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Lagos Wide and Close Online
"An Interactive Journey into an Exploding City"

"Every day, hundreds of people start new lives in Lagos, Nigeria. This megacity is home to an estimated 13 million people who very survival depends on improvisation, networking, and risk-taking.

In 2001, architect Rem Koolhaas and filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak went to Lagos to document one of fastest growing cities in Africa. Based on research by the Harvard Project on the City, this website represents a unique engagement with an exploding city, capturing multiple perspectives of a volatile moment in its evolution.

In this interactive documentary film, the information has been organised according to distance. Loosely based on the trajectory of bus driver Olawole Busayo, it presents intimate encounters with the city and its people on the one hand, and a more removed perspective of Lagos on the other. In the one hour film, viewers join Busayo for his daily journey in the yellow minivan. Switch between a wide and a close view of Lagos and choose between three audio tracks: comments by Rem Koolhaas, conversations with Lagos citizens, or city sounds."



"This interactive documentary is an online adaptation of the DVD Lagos Wide & Close - An Interactive Journey into an Exploding City (2004). As one of the first interactive documentaries ever made, and a rare documentation of Lagos at a volatile moment in its evolution, we decided to make it available on the Internet in 2014.

The interactive film presents a selection of video and audio of Lagos recorded in 2001. It separates the distant – wide — and the intimate – close — views of the city enabling the viewer to switch between these perspectives interactively. Rather than following a dramatic storyline, it aims to bring the viewer close to the reality of what it means to live and work in Lagos, to move alongside bus driver Olawole Busayo and other Lagosians, and to delve into the city’s layered fabric, slowly making sense of the rules, the possibilities, and lifestyles of Lagos.

Increased bandwidth makes it now possible to play the two video channels and three audio channels in parallel online. The Lagos research project by Rem Koolhaas and The Harvard Project on the City, on which this interactive film is based, has not been published yet. With this online adaptation, we hope to provide a permanent and accessible resource for those interested in understanding Lagos and rapid urban growth.

The Explosive Growth of Lagos

Reliable statistics are not available, but based on UN reports and the Lagos city census, it is estimated that every day, hundreds of people start new lives in the African city of Lagos. As the largest port and commercial centre of Nigeria, it is now home to approximately 15 million people. This dangerous, polluted, and in many ways, dysfunctional city, has drainage problems, relentless traffic jams, and shortages of water and electricity, but is somehow working for those who move there to start new lives.

How and why does a city with so many problems continue to grow against all odds? In 2000, architect Rem Koolhaas decided to study Lagos in an attempt to understand the hidden logic that makes a “dysfunctional” city function. His research revealed a population’s unique ability to cope inventively with an urban landscape of disorder and to bring order into it. Lagosians have equipped their expanding metropolis with a finely meshed web of efficient self-organizing networks, challenging the dominant idea that “Lagos doesn’t work.”

Loosely based on the trajectories of bus driver Olawole Busayo, this interactive film provides a wide and a close perspective on an expanding city. In three separate audio tracks, it provides a glimpse of the lives of eight Lagos inhabitants, revealing the creative relationships they develop with their urban environment. In parallel to Busayo’s journey and interviews with Lagosians, Rem Koolhaas voices his reactions, interpretations, and changing attitudes towards Lagos during his five years of research.

Recording in 2001

In 2001, Rem Koolhaas invited filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak to help document his research in Lagos with the Harvard project on the City and photographer Edgar Cleijne. To present Lagos through the eyes of Koolhaas, Van der Haak created the documentary Lagos/Koolhaas that premiered in the International Documentary Festival Amsterdam and the Volksbühne in Berlin in the fall of 2002. As the title suggests, Lagos/Koolhaas is as much a portrait of the architect and his research methods as it is an image of the city of Lagos.

But another, more personal interpretation of the city was embedded in the 55 hours of material she shot with cinematographer Alexander Oey during their three trips to Nigeria — a collection of up-close encounters with the people of Lagos and a tracing of the paths and rhythms of their daily lives. If Koolhaas looked at the patterns of Lagos from afar and then zoomed in on the details, Van der Haak started from within letting personal encounters gradually reveal clues for deciphering the larger picture.

No Event No History

Because filming had long been prohibited in Nigeria, very few images of Lagos existed before 2001. This project involves an extended, chaotic and intimate engagement with a then hardly documented city, capturing multiple perspectives of a unique moment in its evolution, presenting experiences and observations, rather than a linear argument.

As one of the few contemporary records of a city that has been largely ignored by western media – with the exception of ‘news events’ like religious riots and military coups - this project is an invitation to look and listen to Lagos – at a moment in which the energy of change may reveal valuable insights into the uncontrollable forces of urbanization.

Credits

This project has been developed by documentary filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak and designer Silke Wawro in close collaboration with architect Rem Koolhaas, photographer Edgar Cleijne, and the Harvard Project on the City. The concept and scenario for Lagos Wide & Close was developed by Van der Haak and Wawro during a masterclass of the Sandberg Institute and Dutch Cultural Media Fund in 2003 and produced by Submarine. Most of the footage was originally shot in 2001/2002 by Alexander Oey for the linear documentary Lagos/Koolhaas (2002, 55 minutes), directed by Bregtje van der Haak and produced by Pieter van Huystee Film & TV in co-production with VPRO Television. Alexander Oey also edited Lagos Wide & Close. The soundscape was designed by Rik Meier."
lagos  nigeria  via:litheland  cities  interactive  urban  urbanism  storytelling  documentaries  improvisation  risktaking  networking  megacities  remkoolhaas  bregtjevanderhaak  africa  2001  olawolebusayo  soundscapes  2004  2014  edgarcleijne  silkewawro  rikmeier 
march 2015 by robertogreco
ISSEY MIYAKE Official Site
"In 1998, Miyake began to develop A-POC (A Piece Of Cloth) with Dai Fujiwara. A-POC was not only able to create clothing with a high degree of variation, but was also able to control the amount created through the process of casting, where each thread receives computerized instructions. A-POC was revolutionary in that it began with a single thread and resulted in fabric, texture and a fully finished set of clothing in a single process. It led the way, along with the concept of engineering design, to a new methodology of clothing design. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York added this project to its permanent collection in 2006. In 1998, soon after Miyake started research on A-POC, he presented the ISSEY MIYAKE MAKING THINGS exhibition in Paris. (This later traveled to both New York and Tokyo.) The exhibition presented his work from Pleats (1988) onward and was widely acclaimed. “His work is grounded in that stretch of history called the present and draws meaning from fashion’s immediate context. ‘Making Things’ presents that context with immense glamour and wit.” (By Herbert Muschamp, December 27, 1998 The New York Times)"

[image]

"From the exhibition ISSEY MIYAKE MAKING THINGS, Museum of contemporary Art Tokyo, 2000.Just Before [black], A-POC King & Queen[red]
Photo : Yasuaki Yoshinaga"

[image]

"NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, Jan. 2003
P.72-73 “Weaving the Future” A-POC Quatro Cotton, 2001
Photo : Cary Wolinsky and Barbara Emmel Wolinsky
Shown by Alvin Ailey Dancer Dwana Adiaha Smallwood"

[image]

"The New York Times
Sunday, December 27, 1998"
a-poc  isseymiyake  1999  fashion  fabric  textiles  sewing  1998  2003  2000  2001 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Guerrilla Public Service | 99% Invisible
"At some point in your life you’ve probably encountered a problem in the built world where the fix was obvious to you. Maybe a door that opened the wrong way, or poorly painted marker on the road. Mostly, when we see these things, we grumble on the inside, and then do nothing.

But not Richard Ankrom.

In the early morning of August 5, 2001, artist Richard Ankrom and a group of friends assembled on the 4th Street bridge over the 110 freeway in Los Angeles. They had gathered to commit a crime—one Ankrom had plotted for years.

Twenty years earlier, Ankron, then living in Orange County, was driving north on the 110 freeway. As he passed through downtown Los Angeles, he was going to merge onto another freeway, the I-5 North. But he missed the exit and got lost. And for some reason, this stuck with him.

Years later, when Ankrom moved to downtown Los Angeles, he was driving on the same stretch of freeway where he’d gotten lost before. He looked up at the big green rectangular sign suspended above and realized why he missed the exit all those years ago.

The sign was not adequately marked.

The I-5 exit wasn’t indicated on the green overhead sign. It was clear to Ankrom that, the California Department of Transportation (known as Caltrans) had made a mistake.

Ankrom, an artist and sign painter, decided to make the Interstate 5 North shield himself. He also decided that he would take it upon himself to install it above the 110 freeway.

He would call it an act of “guerrilla public service.

Ankrom started by studying L.A. Freeways signs and holding up pantone swatches to perfectly match the paint color. He dangled over bridges to measure the exact dimensions of other signs.

Most importantly, Ankrom consulted the MUTCD, The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, which provides “uniform standards and specifications for all official traffic control devices in California.”

Ankrom wanted his sign to be built to the exact specifications of Caltrans, which were designed to be read by motorists traveling at high speeds. He copied the height and thickness of existing interstate shields, copied their exact typeface, and even sprayed his sign with a thin glaze of overspray of gray house paint so that it wouldn’t look too new.

If he was successful, no one would know that the signs weren’t put up by Caltrans.

As a finishing touch, Ankrom signed his name on the back with a black marker, like a painter signing a canvas.

Then came the next phase of the project: the installation. Ankrom planned it with the precision of a bank heist. He cut his hair, bought some work clothes and a hardhat and an orange vest. He even made a Caltrans contractor-esque decal for his pick-up truck.

He feared he could get arrested, or worse—drop the sign or one of his tools on the cars driving underneath. But he felt it was too late to turn back.

On August 5, 2001, Ankrom parked his truck and went to work. He positioned his ladder over the razor wire and made his way up to the catwalk under the sign, nearly 30 feet above the highway.

The whole installation took less than 30 minutes. As soon as the sign was up, Ankrom packed up his ladder, rushed back to his truck, and blended back into the city.

For about nine months, only a small group of people knew that the Interstate 5 shield hanging above the 110 freeway was a forgery. Then one of Ankrom’s friend leaked the story to a local paper. And that’s how Caltrans found out.

Ankrom had hoped he could get his sign back from Caltrans after they took it down; he figured he would hang it in an art gallery. But Caltrans didn’t take the sign down. His guerrilla sign had passed the Caltrans inspection.

More than eight years after after Ankrom’s sign went up, he got call from a friend who noticed some workers taking it down. It had been replaced with as part of routine maintenance.

When the new sign went up, Caltrans had added the I-5 North shield not only to it, but also to two additional signs up the road.”

[via: https://twitter.com/ablerism/status/566767100556247041 ]
art  publicservice  guerillapublicservice  2015  richardankrom  losangeles  freeways  110  2001  nyc  mta  nycmta  efficientpassengerproject  signs  caltrans 
february 2015 by robertogreco
France Declares War on Islam - Global Guerrillas
"
"It is a war against terrorism, against jihadism, against radical Islam, against everything that is aimed at breaking fraternity, freedom, solidarity... There needs to be a firm message about the values of the republic and of secularism." — French Prime Minister Manuel Valls


Based on this statement alone, it looks like France is about to fall into a Red Queen's Trap. In this case, an all consuming struggle between an increasingly hollow nation-state and a large and growing population of people unwilling to assimilate. For example: here's a government list and atlas of the 751 "sensitive neighborhoods" like the one below that won't assimilate.

If this is a trap, here's what it is going to look like.

Since most nation-states aren't able to offer opportunity anymore (they are hollowing out due to globalization), this assimilation will be accelerated by rules, regulations, and force. In turn, these communities will resist this and seek support from outside (IS, etc.) for resisting, which will lead to more violence. More violence will lead to more government maladaptation -- largely due to the inherent weaknesses of a 21st Century hollow state -- and so on until great damage is done to everyone involved.

So, the big question is: Is France in a trap or not?

Let's dive in. Here are the interesting elements.

The attack wasn't a generic attack on a population center. It was very specific. It was an attack on French secularism, accomplished by passing judgement on the people who promote it. For example, the jihadis asked for specific people at the magazine by name when they arrived.

It was also interesting to me that the reaction to the attack was largely one of solidarity. People around the world showed support for the victims so much so that the #JeSuisCharlie (I am Charlie hashtag) has become the most popular hashtag in history. Here's a map of where it has been used (almost exclusively in the globalized "west"). Further, this solidarity movement is being used to generate massive rallies in Paris and around the world.

Based on this, there are two ways this could go.

If this solidarity is seen as merely support for an end to violence (which I believe it is), the entire thing will be largely forgotten in a week.

However, if it is seen as support for a new push to assimilate Islamic communities and promote secularist values, the Red Queen's trap is sprung.

The statement at the top of the page by the French Prime Minister -- this is a war -- is an indication that France may be in a trap.

PS: The US fell into a Red Queen's trap in 2001 that cost us thousands of lives, trillions of dollars, two lost wars, and most of our basic rights."
johnrobb  2015  #JeSuisCharlieHebdo  #JeSuisCharlie  charliehebdo  freedom  freespeech  france  religion  freedomofspeech  racism  islamophobia  manuelvalls  redqueens'strap  assimilation  globalization  history  economics  nationstates  war  us  2001  hollowstates 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Typotheque: Neutral Typeface
"Aware that there is no such thing as total neutrality, this typeface explores how the absence of stylistic associations can help the reader to engage with the content of a text.

Neutral has been used for numerous projects from books, magazines to websites, and the feedback from these applications helped spur this release. Today, almost a decade after it was originally designed, we are proud to launch an upgraded version of Neutral — completely redrawn, freshly screen optimised, more neutral than ever."

[video: https://vimeo.com/86399448 ]
typography  design  graphicdesign  fonts  neutrality  2001  legiiblity  kaibernau 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Global High - San Diego Magazine - March 2001 - San Diego, California
"If you want to gaze into the face of San Diego’s future, stand at the flagpole of Crawford High School at 2:20 p.m. and absorb the cries, colors and costumes of America the diverse. Hold on to the flagpole, or you will be carried away by cheerleaders in pleated red-white-and-blue Colts skirts; sloe-eyed Cambodians with shining black hair; dark-eyed Somalis in flowing robes; Mexicanas in miniskirts and blue mascara; cholos in Pendleton shirts and baggy jeans; African-Americans in hip-hop gear; white punkers with dyed-green hair.

Erected in 1957, Will C. Crawford High (named for a former schools superintendent) is a comprehensive school serving 1,500 students from the San Diego neighborhood around 54th Street and El Cajon Boulevard. According to California Department of Education statistics, Crawford is the most diverse high school in the state. California is the most diverse state in the United States. America is the most diverse country in the world. If you could see the world through the eyes of Crawford students, what would it look like?

Nearly four years ago, at the end of a school day, Crawford students leaving the campus confronted a melee near the flagpole. Two guys had bumped into each other and started fighting. Friends joined in. Within minutes, dozens of Somalis were fighting a larger number of African-Americans, Samoans, Asians and Latinos. Girls in veils hurled shoes; girls in miniskirts shouted insults. The fight spilled down the steps into the street.

To one African-American, it looked like a rumble without reason. Homies called him to fight the Africans, but he hung back. Jowahir Mohamed, a Somali community aide, rushed to quiet tempers. In her view, it was a stupid fight that had gotten out of hand, not a reflection of deeper ethnic hatreds.

Within minutes the police came; the fight was brought under control. No shots were fired; no one was seriously injured. Arrests were made, ringleaders suspended. The crowd dispersed, kids sent home.

But that was not the end of the story. The media reported that a riot between Africans and African-Americans had broken out at Crawford High. San Diegans who tuned in to TV reports came to believe Crawford was an explosive, ethnically divided school. Although the fight lasted perhaps a half-hour, Crawford still bears the stigma.

By sheer coincidence, I arrived at Crawford to serve as a writing mentor a few days after the so-called riot. Julie Elliott, the principal then, was more upset by the exaggerated media accounts than by the relatively small number of students who had broken rules and were being disciplined. She was enthusiastic about Crawford’s culturally rich student body. The surrounding neighborhood was a landing zone for refugees from Asia, Africa, the Middle East and the Americas. In a world atlas, she traced their homelands; it looked like a Cold War map of U.S. military interventions from Vietnam to Somalia.

Ironically, children of war were relocated from the world’s most dangerous neighborhoods to one of San Diego’s most dangerous neighborhoods, where they competed with established residents for housing and jobs. No wonder Crawford High School was a flash point for cultural conflict. Yet Elliott claimed it was really the opposite. Who was right?"



"As students gather peaceably around the flagpole, I wonder about their future. Will they acquire the skills and economic power to help guide our community into this 21st century? Or will these bright-eyed students be shunned? Will the doors of opportunity open, or will they be trapped in dead-end jobs?

I wish I were more hopeful. Outside Crawford’s gates, differences aren’t always tolerated. If the doors of opportunity slam in their faces, the brightness will fade from San Diego’s cheeks, and our future in the global economy will dim.

The view from the flagpole is not black and white but a color field of impressions on a pointillist canvas. Up close, contrasts are heightened. But from a distance, their faces add up to a compelling portrait of San Diego’s future.

As I head north across the Great Divide of Interstate 8 toward La Jolla, Crawford High disappears into smog. In sprawling suburbs, money buys distance from people who are different. It’s an old story: density and diversity versus space and uniformity. Yet loneliness howls in the hubcaps of fleeing commuters. Pink stucco developments shut spiked gates against the tide of demographic change. Yet locked in gated communities there is a yearning for the “other”—to taste the caviar of diversity.

And then I remember the words of Jawahir Mohamed, a rainbow-robed Somali role model. Jawahir’s eyes twinkle like desert stars beneath her midnight-blue scarf. She laughs: “If you want to travel to Asia, Africa and South America, save your money. Just come to Crawford High!”"

[Part of this series:
http://www.sandiegomagazine.com/San-Diego-Magazine/February-2001/Diversity-and-Division/
http://www.sandiegomagazine.com/San-Diego-Magazine/March-2001/Diversity-and-Division/
http://www.sandiegomagazine.com/San-Diego-Magazine/April-2001/Diversity-and-Division/
crawfordhighschool  2001  sandiego  cityheights  colinadelsol  diversity  schools  education  california 
december 2014 by robertogreco
60 Words - Radiolab
"This hour we pull apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace.

In the hours after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, a lawyer sat down in front of a computer and started writing a legal justification for taking action against those responsible. The language that he drafted and that President George W. Bush signed into law - called the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) - has at its heart one single sentence, 60 words long. Over the last decade, those 60 words have become the legal foundation for the "war on terror."

In this collaboration with BuzzFeed, reporter Gregory Johnsen tells us the story of how this has come to be one of the most important, confusing, troubling sentences of the past 12 years. We go into the meetings that took place in the chaotic days just after 9/11, speak with Congresswoman Barbara Lee and former Congressman Ron Dellums about the vote on the AUMF. We hear from former White House and State Department lawyers John Bellinger & Harold Koh. We learn how this legal language unleashed Guantanamo, Navy Seal raids and drone strikes. And we speak with journalist Daniel Klaidman, legal expert Benjamin Wittes and Virginia Senator Tim Kaine about how these words came to be interpreted, and what they mean for the future of war and peace."
radiolab  language  law  barbaralee  2001  government  9-11  war  waronterror  guantanamo  johnbellinger  rondellums  grecoryjohnsen  haroldkoh  drones  droneproject  dronestrikes  military  timkaine  benjaminwittes  danielklainman 
may 2014 by robertogreco
The Learning State
"Now that I seem to be building a relationship with some readers, it is time to own up to my hitherto secret purpose in writing this column. I want to see "VACATIONLAND" off the car license plates. I want to see it replaced by "The Learning State." Of course the point is not about license plates, which I suppose could be changed by decree from Augusta. It is about how we in Maine think about ourselves and our state, something that cannot be changed "top down" by government. It has to be created "bottom up" by the people of the state. By you and me and all of us.

It would be good for us to have the title of champion state in the field of learning. It would bring business and talent from away. But the driving reason to achieve excellence in learning is necessity. More than most states, our future depends on the capacity of the next generation to adapt to changing economic needs and possibilities. Mainers must be learners.

What would qualify us for the title is a combined score based on the quantity and quality of learning that takes place in the state and on our attitude towards learning and the role of learning in our future. On quality of learning we have a lot going for us. Although our schools have many problems, their students rank high on national tests. Outside of the curriculum itself the state is rich in nuggets of homegrown excellence in learning. As just one example drawn from a large collection I'll be sharing with you in the next months consider the fact that the kids of Deer Isle-Stonington have achieved national status in junior chess contests. And, of course, nobody would expect me to pass over the laptop initiative that has the eyes of the education world focused on our state.

On attitude we have work to do and this is where I hope to make a modest contribution through this column. Last December I wrote on these pages that the time has come for a change of ownership of the laptop initiative: it must stop being "the governor's laptop initiative" to become "our initiative." I outlined ways in which citizens could help and argued that only if many do will the initiative achieve true greatness. But the same arguments apply to all learning. The quality of learning in schools will advance best if the quality of the "learning culture" in our homes and communities advances.

The "home learning culture" is reflected in how we talk about and think about learning in our families. In my column about Bode Miller I tried to show how one can see every event in the world through lenses focused on the learning aspect. In a family with a strong learning culture people who see skiers jump fifty feet into the air and spin their bodies all the way up and down might respond as I did; my wife and I spent the next ten minutes talking about how anyone could possibly learn to do that. The quality of the family learning culture also shows itself in the response to kids knowing more than the grown-up. When your eight-year-old figures out faster than you how to do something with the VCR or the computer are you embarrassed or proud? Do you try to learn from the kid? Do you recognize that kids are experts on learning and can often teach you a lot about how to do it?

I'm trying to use this column to set an example, but using a monologue as an example defeats my purpose. I want dialog. I want to see discussion of learning. Starting next week I am going to make a point of dealing directly with the comments of readers that have begun to trickle into my email. To make this work please send more comments. So please tell me why you think I am crazy to think that Maine can be Number 1 in learning."

[Papert's Bode Miller column: http://www.papert.org/articles/BodeMiller.html ]

[Other column in this series:

"It Takes a Whole State to Raise its Schools"
http://www.papert.org/articles/ItTakesAState.html

"Hard Fun"
http://www.papert.org/articles/HardFun.html

"Computer as Condom"
http://www.papert.org/articles/ComputerAsCondom.html ]
seymourpapert  maine  learning  education  bodemiller  homeschool  unschooling  deschooling  2001  schools  policy  priorities 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Ethel Baraona | dpr-barcelona | TWELVE SUBVERSIVE ACTS TO DODGE THE SYSTEM 1. Open...
"TWELVE SUBVERSIVE ACTS TO DODGE THE SYSTEM

1. Open the imaginary 
2. Operate in illusion 
3. Dislodge the immobile 
4. Think continuity 
5. Surf on the surface
6. Live in obliqueness
7. Destabilize
8. Use the fall
9. Fracture
10. Practice inversion
11. Orchestrate conflict 
12. Limit without closing 

Claude Parent, 2001"
subversion  claudeparent  2001  obliqueness  limits  conflict  inversion  fracture  destabilization  surfaces  continuity  mobility  imagination  illusion 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Che Guevara, Paulo Freire, and the Politics of Hope: Reclaiming Critical Pedagogy - Peter McLaren from 2001 (PDF)
"[Hobbled by complexity:] One of the founding assumptions of critical pedagogy is that human beings, acting on the external world and transforming it, can, at the same time, change their own nature. However, many—if not most—approaches to critical pedagogy are today characterized by what Hegel referred to as bad infinity, because they postulate an endless series of causes and effects within the social order (not in a linear fashion, but dialectically), critically mediating the parts (schooling practices) and the whole (capitalist relations within the wider social totality). The contemporary constitution of critical pedagogy is governed by a series of contradictions. Lacking is a clear context and frame of reference that can capture these contradictions within global processes that are restructuring social, economic, and political life [...OMG...] Revolutionary pedagogy creates a narrative space set against the naturalized flow of the everyday, against the daily poetics of agency, encounter, and conflict, in which subjectivity is constantly dissolved and reconstructed—that is, in which subjectivity turns back on itself, giving rise to an affirmation of the world through naming it and to an opposition to the world through unmasking and undoing the practices of concealment that are latent in the process of naming itself [...]

Che’s pedagogy was more intuitive [and] most assuredly dialectical in nature, and grounded in the lived experiences of the oppressed becoming transformed into the “new man” through acquiring a revolutionary consciousness while at the same time living the life...of the revolutionary. This meant for Che, as it did for Freire, that education needs to take on an extra–ivory tower, public-sphere role in contemporary revolutionary movements and in politics in general [...]

Freire’s ontological theory is radical because it critiques what it has meant thus far to be a human being and also offers the philosophy of what we could become...His theory of knowledge is equally radical/dialectical. Accordingly, no person is an “empty vessel” or devoid of knowledge. Many people have valuable experiential knowledge; all of us have opinions and beliefs; others have greater or lesser degrees of extant—i.e. already existing—knowledge and may even hold qualifications that signify their “possession” of that knowledge. However, in Freirean education the affirmation or acquisition of these types of knowledge is not the end objective of learning but rather the beginning of the dialogical/problem-posing approach to learning."
teaching  philosophy  criticism  complexity  politics  democracy  power  poverty  labor  language  capitalism  economy  class  sur_y_central  cheguevara  paulofreire  petermclaren  2001  via:Taryn  criticalpedagogy  revolutionarypedagogy  pedagogy  everyday  oppression  oppressed  learning  change 
august 2013 by robertogreco
MADE IN CALIFORNIA - NOW - exhibiton tour & interview with Robert Sain
"netropolitan.org interview and exhibition tour with Robert Sain, Director of LACMALab Interview by Lyn Kienholz, copyright 2001, California Int'l Arts Foundation / netropolitan.org

MADE IN CALIFORNIA NOW - The Los Angeles County Museum of Art , LACMA West

Made in California: NOW is the inaugural exhibition of LACMALab. NOW was produced by Robert L. Sain, director of LACMALab, and Kelly Carney, LACMALab program coordinator, in collaboration with Lynn Zelevansky, curator of modern and contemporary art.

[filmed on May 9, 2001]

Introduction with Robert Sain

Part 1 : Jim Isermann
Part 2 : exhibition entrance; Jennifer Steinkemp & Jimmy Johnson
Part 3 : Eleanor Antin; Erika Rothenberg
Part 4 : Michael Asher (1943-2012)
Part 5 : Allan Kaprow & Bram Crane-Kaprow
Part 6 : Art Studio
Part 7 : Victor Estrada; Diane Hall
Part 8 : Martin Kersels; Jacob Hashimoto
Part 9 : Dave Muller; John Outterbridge"
lacma  madeincalifornianow  california  robertsain  jimisermann  jennifersteinkemp  jimmyjohnson  elanorantin  erikarothenberg  michaelasher  allankaprow  bramcrane-kaprow  artstudio  openstudioproject  victorestrada  dianehall  martinkersels  jacobhashimoto  davemuller  johnoutterbridge  2001  lacmalab  lcproject 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Horizontalidad - Wikipedia
"Horizontality or horizontalism is a social relationship that advocates the creation, development, and maintenance of social structures for the equitable distribution of management power. These structures and relationships function as a result of dynamic self-management, involving the continuity of participation and exchange between individuals to achieve the larger desired outcomes of the collective whole."

"As a specific term, horizontalidad is attributed to the radical movements that sprouted in December 2001, in Argentina, after the economic crisis. According to Marina Sitrin, it is a new social creation. Different from many social movements of the past, it rejected political programs, opting instead to create directly democratic spaces and new social relationship."

[Via: https://delicious.com/selinjessa/horizontality ]
[See also: https://delicious.com/selinjessa/verticality ]
anarchy  horizontalism  horizontality  horizontalidad  argentina  politics  hierarchy  via:selinjessa  democracy  anarchism  flatness  marinasitrin  2001 
march 2013 by robertogreco
SI - Dancing with Systems
"The Dance

1. Get the beat.
2. Listen to the wisdom of the system.
3. Expose your mental models to the open air.
4. Stay humble. Stay a learner.
5. Honor and protect information.
6. Locate responsibility in the system.
7. Make feedback policies for feedback systems.
8. Pay attention to what is important, not just what is quantifiable.
9. Go for the good of the whole.
10. Expand time horizons.
11. Expand thought horizons.
12. Expand the boundary of caring.
13. Celebrate complexity.
14. Hold fast to the goal of goodness."
sustainability  noticing  listening  systemswisdom  responsibility  whatmatters  2001  caring  bighere  longnow  humility  learning  attention  systemsthinking  via:selinjessa  donellameadows  complexity  web  design  systems  deepecology 
september 2012 by robertogreco
2001: An Interview with Kathleen Dean Moore | Derrick Jensen
[via: http://randallszott.org/2012/07/05/philosophy-a-living-practice-grace-place-and-the-natural-world-kathleen-dean-moore-the-ecology-of-love/ ]

[broken link, now here: https://www.thesunmagazine.org/issues/303/a-weakened-world-cannot-forgive-us

and here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FDgoxH2-YWV1mqQH5mjNF3tvV_jLzgrcXmBTnb68SbM/edit (and a copy in my Google Drive)]

“Philosophers fretted that the world would disappear if they turned their backs, but when I closed their finely argued books and switched off the light, it was their worries that disappeared, not the world.”

"Not just our bodies, but our minds – our ideas, our emotions, our characters, our identities – are shaped, in part, by places. Alienation from the land is an alienation from the self, which causes sadness. And the opposite is true, too: there’s a goofy joy to finding ourselves in places that have meaning for us."

"So, to a certain extent, it’s your memories that make us who we are. For example, I am the person who remembers seeing a flock of white pelicans over Thompson Lake and the apple tree in the backyard of my house. And every time I notice something, every time something strikes me as important enough to store away in my memory, I add another piece to who I am. These memories and sense impressions of the landscape are the very substance of my self. In this way, I am – at the core of my being – made of the earth."

"Memories do live in places, and if you go there, you can find them. Sometimes, if your memory is as unreliable as mine, you can find them only if you go there."

"Environmental destruction is a kind of self-destruction. If we go around systematically destroying the places that hold meaning for us, that hold our memories, then we become fragmented and don’t have a sense of who we are."

"One of my colleagues says that, if there is eternal life, it isn’t found in the length of one’s life, but in its depth. That makes sense to me. I have no doubt that each life has a definite limit, an endpoint, but I don’t think there is any limit to the potential depth of each moment, and I try to live in a way that reaches into those depths. I want to live thickly, in layers of ideas and emotions and sensory experience. I recommend a way of life that is rich with noticing, caring, remembering, embracing, and rejoicing – in the smell of a child’s hair or the color of storm light."

"We lead lives of relentless separation – comings and goings, airport embraces, loneliness, locked doors, notes left by the phone. And the deepest of all those divides is the one that separates us from the places we inhabit. Everywhere I go, I encounter people who have come from someplace else and left behind their knowledge of that land. Universities, which should study connections, specialize in distinctions instead. Biologists in their laboratories forget that they are natural philosophers. Philosophers themselves pluck ideas out of contexts, like worms out of holes, and hold them dangling and drying in the bright light. We lock ourselves in our houses and seal the windows and watch nature shows on tv. We don’t go out at night unless we have mace, or in the rain without a Gore-Tex jacket. No wonder we forget that we are part of the natural world, members of a natural community. If we are reminded at all, it’s only by a sense of dislocation and a sadness we can’t easily explain."

"You have to be careful how you generalize about Western philosophy, because there are so many different branches of it, and what’s true of one branch might not be true of another.

That said, I think the problem is summed up by Socrates’ statement that philosophy seeks “the true nature of everything as a whole, never sinking to what lies close at hand.” A philosopher, Socrates said, may not even know “what his next-door neighbor is doing, hardly knows, indeed, whether the creature is a man at all; he spends all his pains on the question [of] what man is.”

The implication of his statement is that, if philosophy is concerned with big, abstract ideas, then it must be di-vorced from the details of our lives. I believe that is a huge mistake. If philosophy is about big ideas, then it must be about how we live our lives. If I find out what a human being is, to borrow Socrates’ example, then I will know what makes one human life worth living."

"Jensen: I would like a philosophy that teaches me how to live: How can I be a better person? How can I live my life more fruitfully, more happily, more relationally?

Moore: These are traditionally the most significant philosophical questions, but they’ve been washed off the surface of philosophy by the twentieth century.

It’s a failure of courage, I think. Real-life issues are messy and ambiguous and contradictory and tough. But their complexity should be a reason to engage them, not a reason to turn away. The word clarity has two meanings: one ancient, the other modern. In Latin, clarus meant “clear sounding, ringing out,” so in the ancient world, clear came to mean “lustrous, splendid, radiant.” The moon has this kind of clarity when it’s full. But today that usage is obsolete. Now clear has a negatively phrased definition: “without the dimness or blurring that can obscure vision, without the confusion or doubt that can cloud thought.” For probably twenty years, I thought that this modern kind of clarity was all there was; that what I should be looking for as a philosopher was sharp-edged, single-bladed truth; that anything I couldn’t understand precisely wasn’t worth thinking about. Now I’m beginning to understand that the world is much more interesting than this."

"I’m always surprised when a nature writer describes going off alone to commune with nature. That way of relating to nature is all about isolation, and I don’t have much patience with it. To me, that’s not what being in nature is about at all.

In my life, the natural world has always been a way of connecting with people – my children, my husband, my friends. The richness of my experience in the natural world translates immediately into richer relationships with people.

I think one of the most romantic and loving things you can say to another person is “Look.” There is a kind of love in which two people look at each other, but I don’t think it’s as interesting as the love between two people standing side by side and looking at something else that moves them both.

Let’s think about this in terms of what we were saying about memory and identity: If we are our memories, then to the extent that two people share memories, they become one person. The whole notion of the joining of souls that’s supposed to happen in marriage may come down to those times when we say, “Look,” to our partner, so the two of us can capture a memory to hold in common."
2001  well-being  fluidity  consistency  truth  landscape  connectivism  ecology  ecologyoflove  surroundings  education  learning  community  socialemotional  lcproject  relationships  nature  cv  philosophy  slow  local  highereducation  highered  academia  isolationism  loneliness  isolation  kathleendeanmoore  place  leisurearts  leisure  meaning  geography  memory  memories  space  sharing  environment  environmentalism  looking  seeing  noticing  sharedexperience  beauty  communing  identity  humans  humanism  canon  reconciliation  forgiveness  life  rivers  communities  dams  artleisure  socialemotionallearning  derrickjensen 
july 2012 by robertogreco
A Story More Important than Debt Limit Kabuki | Informed Comment
"The reason that the Republicans deliberately destroyed the balanced budget and created unprecedented government debt was precisely in hopes that at some point they could use the debt as an excuse to destroy social security, medicare, and myriads of educational and health programs. They represent rich people, and the rich don’t want to be having to bear their fair share of the national burden. What better way to get out of having to pay those pesky taxes than making sure the government doesn’t do anything for anyone but the rich.<br />
<br />
So everything unfolding in Washington was planned out in a room in 2001, and is going according to plan."
juancole  crisis  2011  2001  wealth  wealthy  debtlimitkabuki  debtceiling  debtcrisis  government  classwarfare  rich  budget  budgetcuts  taxes  finance 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Stephanie Syjuko — Comparative Morphologies, 2001
"What looks like vintage natural history studies turns out to be, on closer inspection, images of computer and technological cords and peripherals, each slightly manipulated to take on organic characteristics--a fused or sprouting growth from a stem, a viral infection, or a radial symmetry.<br />
<br />
I used a digital camera to photograph the computer cords and peripherals that surrounded my home workstation, and then transferred them to the computer where i digitally altered and added to the original images. Arranged suggestively on an image of a vintage print (the original botanical images on it having been erased), the techie beginnings become transformed into the final archival-quality iris prints."
2001  electronics  morphology  illustration  photography  design  art  stephaniesyjuco  nature  vintage  botany 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Wikipedia
"Welcome to Wikipedia, a collaborative project to produce a complete encyclopedia from scratch. We started in January 2001 and already have over 19,000 articles. We want to make over 100,000, so let's get to work--anyone can edit any article--copyedit, expand an article, write a little, write a lot. See the Wikipedia FAQ for information on how to edit pages and other questions."
wikipedia  history  wiki  nostalgia  web  2001  via:britta 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Modern boys and mobile girls | Books | The Observer
"For sci-fi author William Gibson, Japan has been a lifelong inspiration. Here, the writer who coined the phrase 'cyberspace', explains why no other country comes closer to the future... or makes better toothpaste" ... "Why Japan, then? Because they live in the future, but neither yours nor mine, and somehow make it seem either interesting or comical or really interestingly dreadful. Because they are capable of naming an après-sport drink Your Water. Because they build museum-grade reproductions of the MA-1 flight jacket that require prospective owners to be on waiting lists for several years before one even has a chance of possibly, one day, owning the jacket. Because they can say to you, with absolute seriousness, believing that it means something, 'I like your lifestyle!'"
culture  muji  cyberpunk  japan  tokyo  technology  subculture  scifi  2001  williamgibson  books  future  otaku  interview 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Doing School - Pope, Denise Clark - Yale University Press
"follows 5 motivated & successful students through school year...students work hard in school, participate in extracurricular activities, serve communities, earn awards & honors, appear to uphold school values...on other hand, feel that in order to get ahead they must compromise values & manipulate system by scheming, lying, & cheating...they “do school...are not really engaged w/ learning nor commit to such values as integrity & community.
success  schools  society  integrity  values  education  standardizedtesting  grades  grading  learning  unschooling  deschooling  lying  cheating  tcsnmy  doingschool  schooliness  denisepope  books  2001  materialism  stress  curiosity  cooperation  scheming  assessment  evaluation  lcproject 
april 2010 by robertogreco
School's Out: Get ready for the new age of individualized education - Reason Magazine
"The Homogenizing Hopper...The Home-Schooling Revolution...Free Agent Teaching...The End of High School...A renaissance of apprenticeships...A flowering of teenage entrepreneurship...A greater diversity of academic courses...A boom of national service...A backlash against standards...The Unschooling of Adults...The devaluation of degrees...Older students...Free agent teaching...Big trouble for elite colleges...Learning groupies"
danielpink  education  learning  2001  freedom  unschooling  deschooling  schools  schooling  tcsnmy  autodidactism  future  homeschool  reform  curriculum  motivation  choice  change  gamechanging  freelance  freelanceteaching  freelanceeducation  freelancing  colleges  universities  economics  history  demographics  work  careers  entrepreneurship  apprenticeships  lcproject  standards  testing  alternative  autodidacticism  autodidacts 
september 2009 by robertogreco
TECHNOS - The Trojan Horse of Education by Daniel Greenberg
"One way or another, surreptitiously or overtly, during class hours or after school, students will discover the limitless power that their new paraphernalia can bestow upon them and will increasingly withdraw from the humdrum life and demands of their schools. It will become harder and harder to keep them bound to the confines of prescribed curricula and the mediocrity of the average instructor. Slowly at first, more rapidly as time goes on, the very raison d’etre of traditional schools will disappear, and students will take their education into their own hands and pursue it according to their own lights. All this will happen the more rapidly because of the eagerness with which innocent and naïve school people have rushed to introduce the instrumentalities of the Information Age into their classrooms. They have welcomed the cyber-Trojan-Horse into their midst, and as surely as in ancient Troy, it will end up being the cause of their extinction."
danielgreenberg  technology  learning  autodidacts  schooling  schools  change  tcsnmy  computers  internet  web  online  self-directedlearning  teaching  2001 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Remember the Present « Continental Drift
"This is an inquiry into the representations of crisis and the enactments of counter-memory in Argentina. The aim is to provide a discursive frame for some of the most impressive experiments in political art to have emerged around the turn of the millennium."

[via: http://kashklash.dreamhosters.com/currency-evolution-and-crisis/ ]
argentina  crisis  2001  finance  art  history  economics  politics  protest  imf  buenosaires  collapse  mapping  money  society  activism 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Ex Argentina: mapping the visual and political in Argentina
"La Normalidad (normalisation) was the theme for the third exhibition component of the Ex Argentina project which opened in Buenos Aries at the Palais de Glace on February 14th 2006. Ex Argentina was initiated by Andreas Siekmann and Alice Creischer after the dramatic economic collapse in Argentina in December 2001. They travelled to Buenos Aries in November 2002 to begin an investigation, through artistic methods, of the global and local power relations which precipitated this collapse and its aftermath. Through the exhibition program, and its associated discussions and publications, they hoped to create a geneology of the crisis in Argentina which would help foster a minoritarian and local critique capable of challenging the production of global knowledge on the collapse in Argentina, situating this within a global context."
argentina  crisis  2001  finance  art  history  economics  politics  protest  imf  buenosaires  collapse  mapping  money  society  activism 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Trends in Private Education [from 2001]
"teacher shortage in private schools this year: · declining interest in teaching as a profession (especially among women and people of color as other professional opportunities open for them offering much higher salaries and status).
2001  teaching  education  administration  management  leadership  independentschools  trends  population  nais  sustainability  workforce  careers 
september 2008 by robertogreco
cloudmakers.org
"On April 11, 2001, Cloudmakers was founded as a discussion group for the interative web game centered around the film A.I. We officially solved the game on July 24, 2001. Though the original game, The Beast, has ended, Cloudmakers now serves as a clearin
arg  games  gaming  play  gamedesign  2001  ai  community  entertainment  microsoft  participation  hivemind  perplexcity  pervasive  marketing  interactive 
june 2008 by robertogreco

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