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robertogreco : 2020   16

Different by Design | Rachel Hawley
"Beyond the realm of electoral politics, design plays an important role in spreading leftist messages and catching the attention of the potentially persuadable. Leftist media, still emerging from the cocoon of the subcultural, is now faced with the challenge of synthesizing their messaging with visual interest—without reverting to the all style, no substance aesthetics of liberalism. Since 2011, Jacobin’s covers and spreads have worked to reclaim the minimalist, kinetic style that big tech has spent the better part of a decade laying claim to, while Current Affairs (as well as this magazine) meets Jacobin’s minimalist elegance with its own brassy opulence and lush illustration. Over on the cesspit that is YouTube, Natalie Wynn of the sometimes controversial ContraPoints channel delivers anti-right-wing diatribes while performing camp extravagance, with high production-value costume, set, and lighting design in the mix.

The challenge for leftist design is to chart a visual course distinct from both the garishness of the right and the empty sleekness of the center.

Some of the more grassroots-level innovations in leftist political design can be found in the orbit of the Democratic Socialists of America, whose membership has grown exponentially since 2015. The DSA embraces its socialist legacy with a black, white, and red color palette. Its iconography—the quintessential red rose, hands clasped in unity or raised in a fist, bread and/or grain (a reference to the iconic 1912 Bread and Roses Strike, during which textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, fought for better wages and overtime pay)—is presented across myriad DIY pamphlets, posters, and booklets, in just as many styles, freeing it from the fuss endemic to a design system like Pete Buttigieg’s.

“It turns branding on its head,” says Pressman. “Whereas usually branding is about a consistency of application and approach, this is about a consistency of intent and spirit.”

But the most revolutionary aspect of the DSA’s design is not so much what appears on the page or poster or screen, but how it came to be there. With the visual assets made widely available across the organization, the brand attributes limited in number and easy to build off of, and the pressure for perfection or strict consistency absent, the realm of design is open to a wider range of perspectives while remaining rooted in the goal of facilitating political action. “People talk about democratizing design tools, and usually they mean making it so that anybody can make a pamphlet or a poster, and that’s great,” says Pressman, “but I think the more interesting part of democratizing design is that participants in political action are themselves designing the stuff that’s being used by those actions and those people.”

Today, many of America’s young leftists are working to bring about a more radical continuation of the New Deal ethos. Should that history serve as any indication, the proliferation of art and design will play a crucial role in the years to come, as we find our footing and grow our ranks. For it is bread we fight for, as the song goes—but we fight for roses, too."
design  elections  dsa  control  graphicdesign  socialism  leftists  jacobin  liberalism  illustration  logos  2020  rachelhawley  elitism  centrism  grassroots  democraticsocialistsofamerica  alexandriaocasio-cortez  organizing  unions  labor  petebuttigieg  2026  hillaryclinton  berniesanders 
24 days ago by robertogreco
Episode 87: Nate Silver and the Crisis of Pundit Brain by Citations Needed Podcast
"Nate Silver tell us Joe Biden’s inconsistent political beliefs are, in fact, a benefit. They’re “his calling card” and evidence he “reads the room pretty well”. Venality, we are told, is “a normal and often successful [mode] for a politician.” Insurgent progressive groups like Justice Democrats shouldn’t call Biden out of touch with the base because, Silver tell us, “only 26 of the 79 candidates it endorsed last year won their primaries, and only 7 of those went on to win the general election.”

On Twitter and his in columns, high-status pundit Nate Silver, has made a career reporting on the polls and insisting he’s just a dispassionate, non-ideological conduit of Cold Hard Facts, just channeling the holy word of data. Empirical journalism, he calls it. But this schtick, however, is very ideological - a reactionary worldview that prioritizes describing the world, rather than changing it. For Silver - and data-fetishists like him - politics is a sport to be gamed, rather than a mechanism for improving people’s lives.

We are joined by Current Affairs editor-in-chief Nathan J. Robinson."
natesilver  statistics  elections  politics  2008  2012  2016  2020  2019  polling  data  punditry  538  cynicism  snark  smartpeople  joebiden  nathanrobinson  citationsneeded  racism  mattyglesias  justicedemocrats  progressive  elizabethwarren  barackobama  hillaryclinton  berniesanders  change  meaning  purpose  belief  capitalism  statusquo  ideology  morality  ethics  debates  priorities  quantification  policy  horseraces  gamification  horseracepolitics  electibility  ideas  gaming  chicktodd  media  nytimes  abcnews  espn  donaldtrump  datafetishism  progressivism  values  betting  observationeffect  voting  us  analysis  trolling  entertainment  probability  apathy  apolitical 
27 days ago by robertogreco
Gen X Is Having a (Very Gen X) Moment - GEN
“I’m using “millennial” the way boomers do, as a word that means “someone younger than me who is better at Twitter.” I’m using the generational “we” because I’m full of shit. The generational “we” is as misleading a term of art as the American “we.” Ascribing characteristics, an outlook, and an experience of the world to 84 million people isn’t painting with a broad brush. It makes painting with a broad brush seem precise.”



“But the real reason this Gen X moment feels less like an actual moment and more like a period of mourning for the absence of one is that Gen X culture is fundamentally incompatible with the way legacy-making works.”



“Recently a card-carrying member of Generation X entered the race for President of the United States. His name was Beto O’Rourke. He is 46 and a father and a former senator from El Paso, Texas. He was identifiably One Of Us. He’d been part of the hacker collective Cult of the Dead Cow. He’d been in a punk band with guys who went on to play in unassailably credible outfits like At the Drive-In and the Mars Volta. He posed for said punk band’s album cover wearing his girlfriend’s dress, seemingly less as a statement about gender and more as a big Novoselician goof. He was filmed tooling around on a skateboard and quoted about his admiration of Fugazi. He seems bright and eager to make a difference, and also completely doomed — and not just because attempting to ride the wave that swept history’s most racially and ethnically diverse Congress into office is an inherently room-illiterate thing for a handsome young white guy to do. He seemed doomed because every data point that emerged about his X-ness made him seem more like a traitor to that history. If listening to Fugazi inspires you to run for president — let alone to run against Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren as a centrist Democrat — you have perhaps not been listening to Fugazi correctly.

It’s somehow perfectly Gen X that Beto has already been kickflipped-over in the polls by a millennial; at this point the race to be the white man who loses the nomination to Joe Biden by the smallest margin appears to belong to Pete Buttigieg, whose earliest entries to the historical record include a mixed Harvard Crimson review of Radiohead’s profoundly antiheroic, fan-base-downsizing and therefore archetypally Gen X art-rock opus Kid A. Barring the possibility of Kamala Harris (born in 1964, just outside the X window) and, like the admittedly very X-presenting Barack Obama (born 1961), we may never get to vote for one of our own as president.

This is totally fine. This is better than fine. We are good at ambivalence, as a generation; when we feel ambivalent about tributizing our legacy, we should listen to that ambivalence and treat it like a lodestar. We were right about a great many things — corporate rock really did suck, misogyny really was pervasive and insidious, global warming really was a huge fucking problem. But let us be the first generation to opt out of building monuments to our rightness. Let’s build no monuments at all. Let’s lord nothing over anyone. Let’s expend no energy explaining ourselves and what we stood for to younger people who could not care less. Let’s fund no biopics of our heroes, compile no box sets, commission no further thinkpieces about how the pundits actually had us all wrong. Let us opt out one more time, from the generational requirement to look dismissively at our successors. Let’s be the first generation in modern history to subsume our specific interests to the greater good instead of insisting that the kids defer to our wisdom and experience just because we gave the world curbside recycling and Lilith Fair and voted for Bill Clinton. What we fought for, or didn’t see as worth fighting for, isn’t important. The only battle that matters is between pre-teen climate-change activists and an entrenched political establishment led by a boomer who believes the world goes away when his eyes close. Let us take whatever energy we might have put toward historical reenactments of the first Lollapalooza and use it to support and amplify and backstop anyone working to cancel the apocalypse on any front. It’s our only chance to ensure that when In Utero turns 50 in 2043, there’ll still be a civilization around to celebrate it.”
generations  apocalypse  genx  momuments  unproduct  2019  politics  2020  elections  civilization  legacy 
5 weeks ago by robertogreco
Modern Humanities Research Association :: All Publications :: After Clarice
“After Clarice: Reading Lispector’s Legacy in the Twenty-First Century

Forty years after her death, Clarice Lispector’s startling oeuvre continues to fascinate readers and scholars. Internationally acclaimed writers, from Hélène Cixous to Colm Tóibín, have acknowledged the transformative influence of her writing on their own work. Translations of her novels and short stories appear every year in many languages, making her one of the most widely translated and retranslated Portuguese-language writers of the twentieth century. After Clarice: Reading Lispector’s Legacy in the Twenty-First Century brings together scholars, authors, artists, and translators working in a wide range of languages and disciplines to address Lispector’s place, as a Brazilian writer, in twenty-first century configurations of world literature. It aims to evaluate the fluctuations and swerves in Lispector’s critical fortunes, focusing on the way her works have been reread and transformed in other languages, genres, and media.

Gathering scholarly articles, works of fiction and poetry, personal essays and archival material, this volume explores Lispector’s status as a Jewish writer; issues of identity, class, race, gender and sexuality in her work; translation and reception, as well as the politics of publishing and marketing Lispector for international readerships. In addition to her stories and novels, After Clarice also examines Lispector’s journalism, writing for children, interviews, music and visual art collaborations, and considers how these activities have garnered her new readers in a wide range of disciplines.”
claricelispector  2020  books 
8 weeks ago by robertogreco
David Gooblar on Twitter: "I want to urge you to read @rtraister's extraordinary piece on Elizabeth Warren as a professor. If you, like me, are very interested in both the future of this country and the discipline of teaching and learning, it’s more tha
[via: https://hewn.substack.com/p/hewn-no-316 ]

“I want to urge you to read @rtraister’s extraordinary piece on Elizabeth Warren as a professor. If you, like me, are very interested in both the future of this country and the discipline of teaching and learning, it’s more than worth your time.
https://www.thecut.com/2019/08/elizabeth-warren-teacher-presidential-candidate.html

Traister’s argument: although one might think Warren’s professorial manner might be a liability on the campaign trail, she’s actually a *really good* teacher, and the way that she’s a good teacher might be the key to her success, both as a candidate, and as a political leader.

The way teaching is talked about here—by Warren, but also by Traister—gets to the heart of what it means to be an inclusive teacher, and (to me) draws a thicker line between teaching for social justice and plain old political action for social justice.

For instance: Warren, as a law school prof, relied on the Socratic method in her classes. The Socratic method means different things to different people, but in a law-school context, it usually means the relentless grilling of students, one at a time, to reveal their weaknesses.

There are a lot of problems with this mode of teaching, like: what are all the other students supposed to be doing while the one unlucky sap is being questioned?

Traister refers to “the seeming paradox of a woman known as a bold political progressive adhering to an old-fashioned, rule-bound approach to teaching.” But it’s not a paradox, because the way Warren conceives of the Socratic method is actually deeply progressive.

She worried that “traditional” discussion, in which the professor only calls on those students who raise their hands, inevitably reinforced privilege. “The reason I never took volunteers,” Warren tells Traister, “is when you take volunteers, you’re going to hear mostly from men.”

Instead, she adopted a cold-calling approach that made sure as many students were involved in each class period as possible. Here, Traister quotes one of Warren’s TAs, whose sole job during class was to keep track of who had spoken, and who hadn’t yet.

[image: “In this position, Ondersma remembered, she had one job: to make sure everyone got called on equally. “The whole idea was that she wanted everybody in the classroom to participate.” Ondersma would sit with the class list and check off every student who’d gotten a cold-call question. Then, in the last ten minutes of the class, “I’d hand her a notecard with the names of all the students she’d not yet called on,” and Warren would try to get to them all.”]

(A few years ago I wrote about cold-calling as a way to invite students into discussions. It’s a weird thing: it feels old-fashioned and authoritarian to many of us, but it can actually help ensure your discussions are more democratic.)

In line with that emphasis on reaching everybody, whenever a student would come to office hours before an exam with a question, Warren would ask the student to write the question down, so she could send it (and her answer) to every student.

Traister quotes one of Warren’s students: “it was very important to her that people were not going to have any structural advantage because they were the kind of person who knew to come to talk to a professor in office hours.” What a great idea!

I often tell faculty that teaching is much more defined by their mindset than by whatever teaching strategies they adopt. From what this piece tells us, it’s clear that Warren gets that, and that her mindset is the right one.

Look at how she talks about teaching:

[images:

““That’s the heart of really great teaching,” she said. “It’s that I believe in you. I don’t get up and teach to show how smart I am. I get up and teach to show how smart you are, to help you have the power and the tools so that you can build what you want to build.””

"But she explained to him the thinking behind hers: 90 minutes, she said, is a long time to sit and be talked to. The Socratic classroom as she handled it forced everyone in it to pay close attention not only to what she was saying but also to what their fellow students were saying. She was not the leader of conversation; she was facilitating it, prompting the students to do the work of building to the analysis.

It’s a pedagogical approach that Warren sees as linking all of her experiences of teaching. “It’s fundamentally about figuring out where the student is and how far can I bring them from where they are.”"]

Her approach to teaching begins with students, with thinking about the students’ experience, with consciously altering her approach so that as many students as possible can get as valuable an experience as possible. That is, at heart, an inclusive teaching practice.

But maybe even cooler is the way in which Traister goes beyond showing what a great teacher Warren was. She connects Warren’s pedagogical approach with her political one, in a way that really gets me thinking about the role of teaching and learning in our public life.

We often talk about politics in terms of communication—how well a certain candidate is getting her ideas across to potential voters—but the task is more complex than that typical lens suggests. It’s less communication than it is persuasion—persuading people to act.

Persuading people to vote for you, yes. But also persuading people that they are capable of action. Persuading people that they have agency, that they can do more than they currently think they can.

If you want to succeed at this kind of persuasion, you’d be wise to learn from the scholarship of teaching and learning, which is precisely concerned with these questions. How do we help other people do things—for themselves?

If learning is the work of students—if we can’t *make* students learn—then how do we help them do that work? What conditions can we create that make that work more likely to happen? That is the teacher’s task.

Likewise, if real political change is the work of citizens—many, many citizens changing the political reality, not a single politician—then how do we create the conditions in which that work is more likely to happen? That, Warren suggests, is the political leader’s task.

Elizabeth Warren can’t make us do the work of banding together to defeat corruption, inequality, injustice. But maybe she can use inclusive teaching methods to help us come to the conclusion—on our own—that such action is necessary, and possible. That is a wild sentence to type.

Traister does great work drawing parallels between Warren’s teaching practice and her campaign tactics. She quotes Warren talking about the challenge of teaching people about her proposed wealth tax, and why it’s not so radical:

[image: "When she was first doing town halls, after proposing a wealth tax, she said, “I’d look at the faces and think, I don’t think everybody is connecting. It’s not quite gelling. So I tried a couple of different ways, and then it hit me. I’d say, ‘Anybody in here own a home or grow up where a family owned a home?’ A lot of hands would go up. And I’d say, ‘You’ve been paying a wealth tax forever. It’s just called a property tax. So I just want to do a property tax; only here, instead of just being on your home, for bazillionaires, I want it to be on the stock portfolio, the diamonds, the Rembrandt, and the yachts.’ And everyone kind of laughs, but they get the basic principle because they’ve got a place to build from.”"]

Elsewhere, Traister brilliantly points out that Warren’s habit of calling individual donors on the phone—regular people who gave $50 or whatever—mirrors her cold-calling in class, ensuring that *more people* are being heard from than the usual men raising their hands.

This is partly because I’m really inspired by Warren in general, but the piece really underlines for me the value of inclusive teaching, the importance of the work teachers do, in helping students remake themselves, and remake their worlds.

Inclusive teaching practices are based on sturdy research on how students learn best. But they follow, 1st of all, from a choice the teacher makes. We must choose to be committed to every student, to put their development first, to be led by them, rather than the other way around

That is, I’m sorry to say it, a political choice. Not because we’re trying to get our students to vote a certain way. But because we help students believe in their own possibility, in their own agency. I happen to think it’s hugely important.

Anyway, I should probably have just written this as an essay (and I don’t want to quote/screenshot from it any more)—go read the piece! https://www.thecut.com/2019/08/elizabeth-warren-teacher-presidential-candidate.html

Oh, and the companion episode of The Cut on Tuesdays (one of the best podcasts going, by the way), is delightful. You get to hear Warren herself talk about teaching, including a truly excellent rubber band metaphor that I’m going to use in workshops.
https://cms.megaphone.fm/channel/thecut?selected=GLT3342909803

Also also: [image of Elizabeth Warren with her dog]“
davidgooblar  elizabethwarren  teaching  howweteach  politics  elections  2019  2020  learning  howwelearn  education  highered  highereducation  inclusion  inclusivity  rebeccatraister  socraticmethod  instruction  pedagogy  via:audreywatters  cold-calling  lawschool  studentexperience  citizenship  participation  participatory  gender 
10 weeks ago by robertogreco
Jonathan Kozol: Joe Biden Didn’t Just Praise Segregationists. He Also Spent Years Fighting Busing | Democracy Now!
[See also:

"Part 2: Jonathan Kozol on “When Joe Biden Collaborated with Segregationists”"
https://www.democracynow.org/2019/6/26/jonathan_kozol_on_when_joe_biden

and

"When Joe Biden Collaborated With Segregationists: The candidate’s years as an anti-busing crusader cannot be forgotten—or readily forgiven."
https://www.thenation.com/article/joe-biden-education-busing-opposition/

"Unlike Bernie Sanders, who recently proposed a Thurgood Marshall Plan for public education that calls for a renewal and expansion of desegregation plans by means of transportation, Biden still believes his original position was correct and, according to one of his aides, Bill Russo, sees no reason to revise it. No matter how he tries to blur the edges of his past or present beliefs, no matter how he waffles in his language in order to present himself as some kind of born-again progressive, Biden has not shown that he can be trusted to confront our nation’s racist past and one of its most urgent present needs.

As the mainstream media repeatedly reminds us, Biden is a likable man in many ways. Even his critics often speak about his graciousness. But his likability will not help Julia Walker’s grandkids and her great-grandchildren and the children of her neighbors go to schools where they can get an equal shot at a first-rate education and where their young white classmates have a chance to get to know and value them and learn from them, as children do in ordinary ways when we take away the structures that divide them."]
jonathankozol  2019  joebiden  racism  race  elections  2020  education  schools  schooling  busing  segregation  integration  fannielouhamer  thrurgoodmarshall  juneteenth  corybooker  desegregation  amygoodman  newyork  california  illinois  delaware  maryland 
june 2019 by robertogreco
The Teens Running Former Sen. Mike Gravel's Presidential Campaign (HBO) - YouTube
"What happens when you mix the online snark and progressive idealism of the podcast-listening teen and the dgaf attitude of a 88 year-old lefty?

You get the Mike Gravel For President campaign.

A group of massively online college and high school students heard about Gravel a little while ago on Chapo Trap House, the podcast of record for the Bernie set. Gravel got famous in 1971 when, as senator from Alaska, he read the Pentagon Papers into the Senate record, effectively declassifying them. Then he dropped off the radar for a long while until 2008, when he ran a quixotic bid for president. He didn't get very far, but he got far enough to create a few viral moments on the debate stage. Gravel was the anti-war conscience in the primary.

That's the role the college and high school students want Gravel to play in the 2020 Democratic primary too. Most of them are supporters of Bernie Sanders, but they think getting Gravel on the debate stage again could help Sanders by giving him an ally and help push the entire party to the left.

So the teens talked Gravel into running again. But this time, Gravel doesn't really want to leave his California home. He's given the kids control of his online identity, and they've used it to raise thousands of dollars — and attack just about every other Democratic candidate.

VICE News met up with Gravel as he hosted the teens in real life for the first time."
mikegravel  2019  2020  politics  elections  berniesanders  socialmedia  twitter  privilege  progressive  movements  individuals  grassroots  resistance  change  democrats  democracy  publicity  alexandriaocasio-cortez 
april 2019 by robertogreco
Andrew Yang is the most radical 2020 candidate
"Going all the way back to the Roman republic, the owners of wealth have repeatedly sought to maximize their share of the common weal at the expense of those who work for them, leading to periodic crises as the plebes rise up and demand a fairer share. We may be in another such moment. Sanders's theory of political change revolves around a political revolution — a citizenry mobilized by a champion of conviction who wins a sweeping majority to enact his transformative agenda. Warren's theory of political change is less clearly articulated, but her solutions aim to build lasting support by giving a vast array of workers and small businesspeople a stake in a more competitive and less oligopolistic economy. But both imagine a world still anchored by work, and getting workers a fair share.

If that world is passing away, then we ought to be facing the happy problem Marx described, where "society regulates the general production and thus makes it possible for me to do one thing today and another tomorrow, to hunt in the morning, fish in the afternoon, rear cattle in the evening, criticize after dinner, just as I have a mind." But the rub has always been who that "society" actually is. If a productive interdependency is going to be replaced by an outright dependency, then even if that dependency is as benevolently administered as Yang hopes it might be, we face the prospects of a more profound social revolution than he has bargained for."
politics  californianIdeology  technopoly  andrewyang  technosolutionism  elections  policy  2019  2020  society  wealth  berniesanders  elizabethwarren  karlmarx  interdependency  dependency  universalbasicincome  revolution  radicalism  via:ayjay 
april 2019 by robertogreco
The Dig - 2020 with Briahna Gray, Dave Weigel and Waleed Shahid - Blubrry Podcasting
"What might Bernie 2020 look like, particularly now that almost everyone claims to be for Medicare for All (whatever they might mean by that)? Will Harris' track record as a law-and-order prosecutor doom her, or will her appeal as a woman of color rally a decisive number of votes? And will Biden being exposed as utterly unfit for the 2020 Democratic base send his poll numbers crashing? What impact will AOC have on defining what voters want and demand? Dan discusses all of this and more with Briahna Gray, Dave Weigel and Waleed Shahid."
briahnagray  daveweigel  waleedshahid  medicareforall  barackobama  kmalaharris  hillaryclinton  donaldtrump  2019  2020  democrats  corybooker  elections  joebiden  politics  economics  socialism  republicans  petebuttigieg  juliáncastro  tulsigabbard  kirstengillibrand  amyklobuchar  elizabethwarren  johnhickenlooper  palestine  berniesanders  michaelbloomberg  sherrodbrown  betoo'rourke  howardschultz  race  gender  sexism  identitypolitics  policy  government  healthcare  alexandriaocasio-cortez  ilhanomar  socialjustice  criminaljustice  class  classism  rashidatlaib 
february 2019 by robertogreco
Kenya Hara Unveils Rejected 2020 Tokyo Olympics Logo Proposal | Spoon & Tamago
"In September the Tokyo 2020 Olympics Committee announced that they would scrap Kenjiro Sano’s logo amid plagiarism claims and redo the entire process. But when they did that they also effectively scrapped the other 103 proposals, each created by professionals who spent a decent amount of time and resources perfecting their concept.

Now, renowned designer and one of the foremost faces of Japanese design, Kenya Hara, is speaking out. And in doing so, he has released his proposal from the Hara Design Institute.

“Removing the curtain from the design competition will help graphic design become more widely understood,” says Kenya Hara, explaining why he decided to publish his team’s propals. “It will serve as a valuable resource in contemplating our future Olympics logo.” He notes that the Olympics symbol and “Tokyo 2020” have been obscured so as to avoid any copyright claims.

Hara’s proposal is one that symbolizes “our planet making great strides,” “a beating heart” and the “summit.” The two planetary logos reference the sun, the moon and an arena where humans can transcend any bickering and come together for the great games.

In today’s world of design planning it’s no longer sufficient to simply come up with a beautiful logo. Various applications and forms of communication must also be considered. And in that sense, Hara’s design team has created a remarkable proposal that adaptable to various needs.

But in a surprising and rather confounding decision, the Olympics committee has opened up the new round of proposals to the public, allowing anyone over 18 to submit their idea. They’re accepting entries through December 7, 2015. The competition will undoubtedly bulge into a marathon with thousands of runners. We stand with designer Kenya Hara in hopes that this next race, whatever it turns out to be, is more transparent."
kenyahara  design  graphicdesign  logos  olympics  via:tealtan  graphics  japan  tokyo  2020 
november 2015 by robertogreco
Algo Nuevo Parte 1 (Ahora es cuando) on Vimeo
[Parte II: https://vimeo.com/82035242
Parte III: https://vimeo.com/82140664
Parte IV: https://vimeo.com/82155657 ]

["noticias de algúna parte para todos ciudadanos colectivos"
http://algonuevoblog.tumblr.com/ ]

[See also: http://www.goethe.de/ins/cl/de/sao/kul/mag/zgi/20377516.html (Google translation follows.)

"The staff of the Historical Museum asserts something, I must strongly disagree: That capitalism is everything einverleibe, resistance is futile. I feel that as a lame excuse and guidance to passivity, almost as aesthetic total surrender of all creators and try my interlocutors an era after irony, cynicism and defeatism show - radebrechend, after two weeks of Spanish lessons in Bella Vista, television rages loudly above us and below us the engine noise of the Calle Merced. I speak of Cybersyn, a cybernetic economy project during the Unidad Popular, a kind of early socialist Internet, which should strengthen the base and promote self-governing structures, swarms of Stafford Beers icosahedron as a geometric model for non-hierarchical, describing the curiosity and alertness of the now 98 -year Victor Pey, who fought in the Spanish Civil War alongside the anarchist Buenaventura Durruti against the fascists and with whom I had the good fortune to be able to talk last week about today's spirit of Chilean youth and finally try on the horizon a new form the "international solidarity" imagine. This, however, would no longer be controlled by a single party in the 21st century, but of a scattered community of interests, of Ciudadanos colectivos (Tito Tricot). Carla Miranda agrees with their employees by disbelieving shakes his head, because "it but really no reason is to hope. " I insist that all over the world formulated resistance and nothing will absorb just because somewhere a new product is created. The energy would not escape, is still available, I try to drown out the TV. Evidence they want to see. Whether we want to drink Coke, Fanta or Sprite, we were asked, before eating, before us a cup wheat bun along with a tube of mayonnaise. Here and now, at this eatery we have no choice and I have no evidence.

Last I spoke with the historian César Leyton Robinson, who had Hannah Arendt's totalitarianism-book lying on the desk, on the "Prussianization" Chile in the 19th and 20th century, totalitarian economy at the beginning of the 21st century, as well as forms of colonial appropriation of indigenous knowledge. He painted me a line on, from the first German newcomer in Valdivia, the zoologist Rudolf Philippi, through to today's biologists and seed magnate Erik von Baer. A week later I meet Domingo Oñate, a Mapuche historian in Temuco, I talk about the beginnings of the racist policy of "whitewashing" in the 19th century. The Germans were the only ones who would not be mixed. The colonial distinction between civilization (= light-skinned, decent, honest, progressive) and barbarism (= dark-skinned, lazy, messy, retrograde) was felt to this day. At the exit to the former Colonia Dignidad we drive over. What interests me less the exception, that place of torture and excessive violence today folkloric euphemistically in Villa Bavaria renamed, but rather the general heritage of German immigration. A book, published to coincide with the 150th German colonization in 1998, is a testimony: German orchestras, choirs, schools, careers, long may they live, three times high! Nazism is simply hidden. Revisionism or sense of tradition? Is the exception the rule? Should I pursue the gloomy thesis Agamben, who claims that all "camp" is, today, the gated communities of the rich? And do not already Voltaire has guileless Candide pockets full of diamonds stuffed in order to free themselves from the struggle for existence? - I hear the cynics happy call.

Confidence on the other hand, the us in the Comunidades is placed in the Mapuche in the mountains behind Curarrehue, the songs of their ancestors, which we get to hear the holistic connection to the earth, to Wallmapu , all of which tells a different story. And the seed of wheat is now "only" to fifty percent in the hands of "Semilla Baer". The optimist would say that the chances are 50-50. Here in Araucanía, the land of beautiful lakes and mountains, created the first images that will tell a different story on stage - neither of constantly still haunted the minds millennium still the hegemonic domination of transnational corporations, which on the best ways are to devastate the planet for thousands of years.

Kevin Rittberger, Curarrehue, January 9, 2014" ]
chile  history  2020  scifi  sciencefiction  neoliberalism  2014  2013  future  buenaventuradurruti  cybersyn  unidadpopular  hannaharendt  césarleytonrobinson  rudolfphilippi  domingooñate  mapuche  whitewashing  temuco  valdivia  carlamiranda  capitalism  araucanía  agamben  germany  germans  kevinrittberger  arauco  forestry  collectivism  anarchism  srg 
september 2014 by robertogreco
The Classroom In 2020 - Forbes.com
"In 2020 we will see an end to the classroom as we know it. The lone professor will be replaced by a team of coaches from vastly different fields. Tidy lectures will be supplanted by messy real-world challenges. Instead of parking themselves in a lecture hall for hours, students will work in collaborative spaces, where future doctors, lawyers, business leaders, engineers, journalists and artists learn to integrate their different approaches to problem solving and innovate together...Schools around the country are moving aggressively to rethink their memorize-and-test approach. At a charter school in one of the Bay Area's poorest and most violent neighborhoods, teacher Melissa Pelochino took what she learned at a d.school workshop back to her classroom and saw measurable leaps in literacy and critical thinking skills. Meanwhile, the Henry Ford Learning Institute is scaling models developed at a successful small high school, removing the boundaries between learning and the real world."
interdisciplinary  education  d.school  classroom  change  technology  teaching  trends  future  tcsnmy  criticalthinking  collaboration  2020  praxis  classrooms 
april 2010 by robertogreco
TeachPaperless: 21 Things That Will Become Obsolete in Education by 2020
1. Desks 2. Language Labs 3. Computers 4. Homework 5. The Role of Standardized Tests in College Admissions 6. Differentiated Instruction as the Sign of a Distinguished Teacher 7. Fear of Wikipedia 8. Paperbacks 9. Attendance Offices 10. Lockers. 11. IT Departments 12. Centralized Institutions 13. Organization of Educational Services by Grade 14. Education School Classes that Fail to Integrate Social Technology 15. Paid/Outsourced Professional Development 16. Current Curricular Norms 17. Parent-Teacher Conference Night 18. Typical Cafeteria Food 19. Outsourced Graphic Design and Webmastering 20. High School Algebra I 21. Paper [At TCSNMY we've done a lot of this, but still need to work on: 4-slowly, 5-kinda, but need more parent ed, 8-need better screens, 12-slowly, 13-need lots of parent ed, 15-getting there, 17-not sure I agree (we do student-parent-teacher conferences), 20, 21-slowly making progress]"

[Update: http://teachpaperless.blogspot.com/2010/06/get-real.html ]
education  21stcenturylearning  leadership  learning  technology  future  teaching  change  innovation  2009  elearning  edtech  predictions  knowledge  ideas  2020  trends  tcsnmy  shellyblake-pock  21stcentury  21stcenturyskills  paperless  twitter 
december 2009 by robertogreco
2020 Forecast: Creating the Future of Learning
"A Radically Different World: If you think our future will require better schools, you're wrong. The future of education calls for entirely new kinds of learning environments. If you think we will need better teachers, you're wrong. Tomorrow’s learners will need guides who take on fundamentally different roles. As every dimension of our world evolves so rapidly, the education challenges of tomorrow will require solutions that go far beyond today’s answers. Join us in exploring the forces shaping our world."

[via: http://www.iftf.org/node/2724 ]
education  society  learning  future  pedagogy  futurism  21stcentury  21stcenturyskills  schooling  schools  unschooling  deschooling  reform  change  tcsnmy  knowledge  libraries  elearning  trends  creativity  research  gamechanging  knowledgeworks  iftf  lcproject  21stcenturylearning  2020  technology  teaching  forecast 
april 2009 by robertogreco

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