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robertogreco : 21stcentury   13

MICHEL SERRES – 032c Workshop
"MICHEL SERRES is a French philosopher who specializes in the history of science and whose work attempts to reclaim the art of thinking the unthinkable. Born in 1930 in Lot-et-Garonne, Serres is a member immortel of L’Académie française and has been a professor at Stanford University, in the heart of Silicon Valley, since 1984. He’s authored more than 60 volumes that range in topics from parasites to the “noise” that lingers in the background of life and thought. Serres’ writing is like a slow night of constant drinking, taking us irreversibly to places we didn’t know we were heading towards.

In 1985 he published Les cinq sens, a lament on the marginalization of the knowledge we gain from our fives senses through science and the scientific mind. So it came as somewhat of a surprise for his observers when Serres came out in unrestrained support of online culture, particularly Wikipedia, in the first years of the 2000s. “Wikipedia shows us the confidence we have in being human,” he said in 2007. Whether through technology or our own bodies, the world of information is only ever accessible through mediation (Serres often deploys the Greek god Hermes and angels in his writing). His most recent book, Petite Poucette (2012), or “Thumbelina,” is an optimistic work that discusses today’s revolution in communications and the cognitive and political transformations it’s brought about. “Army, nation, church, people, class, proletariat, family, market … these are abstractions, flying overhead like so many cardboard effigies,” Serres writes in Petite Poucette. It’s been on the French bestseller list since its release and has sold more than 100,000 copies. It’s a sort of love letter to the digital generation, and surprising in many ways. One of these is that almost no one in the English-speaking world has ever heard of it. In this conversation with 032c’s contributing editor Hans Ulrich Obrist, Serres muses on the dawn of our new era."



"HUO: You’ve often collaborated with others, and conversation is an important practice in your philosophy. Do you believe that we can invent new forms through collaboration, or even through friendship?

MS: Yes. Certainly. I think it can be done. The key to inventing through conversation is to ensure that the conversation is not … a sort of fight to the death between two set opinions. Each participant in the conversation must be free and open."
michelserres  hansulrichobrist  interviews  2014  digitalnatives  communication  optimism  petitpoucette  adamcurtis  revolution  tocqueville  21stcentury  micheldemontaigne  wikileaks  julianassange  wikipedia  knowledge  mobile  phones  quasi-objects  objects  future  society  conversation  philosophy  resistance  technology  justice  ecologicjustice  politics  montaigne  collaboration 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Archives & Museum Informatics: Museums and the Web 2010: Papers: Cope, A.S., Buckets and Vessels
"With the mass of digital "stuff" growing around us every day and simple tools for self-organization evolving beyond individuals into communities of suggestions, is the curatorial prerogative itself becoming a social object?

This paper examines the act of association, the art of framing and the participatory nature of robots in creating artifacts and story-telling in projects like Flickr Galleries, the API-based Suggestify project (which provides the ability to suggest locations for other people's photos) and the increasing number of bespoke (and often paper-based) curatorial productions."
curation  archives  archive  art  flickr  galleries  geotagging  commons  stamen  museums  21stcenturyskills  21stcentury  communities  community  paper  social  data  aaronstraupcope 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Big Thinkers: Linda Darling-Hammond on Becoming Internationally Competitive | Edutopia
"Stanford University professor and noted researcher Linda Darling-Hammond discusses what the United States can learn from high-achieving countries on teaching, learning, and assessment -- from Finland to Singapore."
education  learning  teaching  schools  reform  21stcentury  edutopia  curriculum  international  global  finland  singapore  lindadarling-hammond  tcsnmy  projectbasedlearning  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  nclb  policy  standards  us  teachereducation  training  classpreparation  pbl 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Teachers and Community Members Practice TLC with PLCs | Edutopia
""We need to let go of the idea that heroic individuals will change schools," says Richard DuFour, an education consultant who specializes in creating professional learning communities in schools. "Instead of looking for superheroes, we need to work collectively to help everyone be successful."
plc  pln  learning  schools  change  collaboration  edutopia  leadership  network  21stcentury  communities  professionaldevelopment  merit  community 
january 2010 by robertogreco
TeachPaperless: 21 Things That Will Become Obsolete in Education by 2020
1. Desks 2. Language Labs 3. Computers 4. Homework 5. The Role of Standardized Tests in College Admissions 6. Differentiated Instruction as the Sign of a Distinguished Teacher 7. Fear of Wikipedia 8. Paperbacks 9. Attendance Offices 10. Lockers. 11. IT Departments 12. Centralized Institutions 13. Organization of Educational Services by Grade 14. Education School Classes that Fail to Integrate Social Technology 15. Paid/Outsourced Professional Development 16. Current Curricular Norms 17. Parent-Teacher Conference Night 18. Typical Cafeteria Food 19. Outsourced Graphic Design and Webmastering 20. High School Algebra I 21. Paper [At TCSNMY we've done a lot of this, but still need to work on: 4-slowly, 5-kinda, but need more parent ed, 8-need better screens, 12-slowly, 13-need lots of parent ed, 15-getting there, 17-not sure I agree (we do student-parent-teacher conferences), 20, 21-slowly making progress]"

[Update: http://teachpaperless.blogspot.com/2010/06/get-real.html ]
education  21stcenturylearning  leadership  learning  technology  future  teaching  change  innovation  2009  elearning  edtech  predictions  knowledge  ideas  2020  trends  tcsnmy  shellyblake-pock  21stcentury  21stcenturyskills  paperless  twitter 
december 2009 by robertogreco
On Using Technology without Understanding It at Beyond School
"Surely s/he knew that the 21st Century writer learns as much from the 21st Century reader as the reader does from the writer. (Because 21st Century readers — the best ones, anyway — write with the writer. Just look at Nobel-winning economist Paul Krugman’s blog, all the references he makes in his writing to what his readers are saying in comments. Look at Rolling Stones’ Matt Taibbi having conversations with his readers in the space beneath his articles — you know, those silly “forum”-like things. Just look.)

So yeah, I wanted to respond to it, and share to the world here on my (real) blog. I thought the writing and the critique of the rush to laptop use in the classroom were that good.

But the editorial was on that precious resource and traditional tool called — what was it? It’s been so long since I’ve written on it–oh yeah, paper, so no luck there (for me, or the forests, or the atmosphere, or the students’ future environmental situation)."
21stcenturyskills  students  digitalnatives  clayburell  publishing  tcsnmy  technology  luddism  teaching  learning  edtech  education  schools  writing  newmedia  21stcentury  21stcenturylearning  pedagogy  future 
december 2009 by robertogreco
The Power of Educational Technology: 9 Common Principles for 21st Century Schools
"1. Build Community
2. Encourage Critical Thinking
3. Reward Risk Taking
4. Focus on all Learners
5. Value Diversity
6. Nurture all learners
7. Pursue Innovation
8. Teach Empathy
9. Break down the walls"
schools  education  tcsnmy  learning  technology  criticalthinking  21stcenturyskills  21stcentury  teaching  21stcenturylearning  edtech  empathy  diversity  innovation 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Presentation to the FCC National Broadband Planning Workshop - Practical Theory
"I think the scariest thing about today is -- as I listened to the speakers -- there is a growing movement in America to give up on schools. If we as educators want to be a part of the coming conversation about what learning looks like, we must offer a compelling vision of what schools can be. We must be willing to examine our own practice and be willing to change. And we must engage parents and students in the conversation, because if we don't, the "education economy" will end up recreating schools in a way that, in my opinion, will leave us good at training, but poor at learning. Jim Shelton said in his remarks today, "There are businesses that want this market, so they will create opportunities for kids." That's not the vision of education I have for my children, and it's not the vision of education I have for the students in my charge."
chrislehmann  policy  politics  money  economics  schools  publicschools  privatization  change  reform  technology  learning  education  administration  leadership  pedagogy  teaching  21stcentury  edtech  web2.0  innovation 
august 2009 by robertogreco
2020 Forecast: Creating the Future of Learning
"A Radically Different World: If you think our future will require better schools, you're wrong. The future of education calls for entirely new kinds of learning environments. If you think we will need better teachers, you're wrong. Tomorrow’s learners will need guides who take on fundamentally different roles. As every dimension of our world evolves so rapidly, the education challenges of tomorrow will require solutions that go far beyond today’s answers. Join us in exploring the forces shaping our world."

[via: http://www.iftf.org/node/2724 ]
education  society  learning  future  pedagogy  futurism  21stcentury  21stcenturyskills  schooling  schools  unschooling  deschooling  reform  change  tcsnmy  knowledge  libraries  elearning  trends  creativity  research  gamechanging  knowledgeworks  iftf  lcproject  21stcenturylearning  2020  technology  teaching  forecast 
april 2009 by robertogreco
IDEO’s Ten Tips For Creating a 21st–Century Classroom Experience
"1. Pull, don’t push. 2. Create from relevance. 3. Stop calling them “soft” skills. 4. Allow for variation. 5. No more sage onstage. 6. Teachers are designers. 7. Build a learning community. 8. Be an anthropologist, not an archaeologist. 9. Incubate the future. 10. Change the discourse. "
education  curriculum  teaching  tips  design  ideo  pedagogy  tcsnmy  projectbasedlearning  anthropology  engagement  21stcenturylearning  21stcentury  innovation  learning  technology  experience  classroom  creativity  21stcenturyskills  pbl  classrooms 
february 2009 by robertogreco
When 21st-Century Schooling Just Isn't Good Enough
"One last point. We will of course continue to talk earnestly about the need for a curriculum that features “critical thinking” skills – by which we mean the specific proficiencies acceptable to CEOs. But you will appreciate the need to delicately discourage real critical thinking on the part of students, since this might lead them to pose inconvenient questions about the entire enterprise and the ideology on which it’s based. There’s certainly no room for that in the global competitive economy of the future. Or the present."

[via: http://education.change.org/blog/view/standardized_incoherence ]
alfiekohn  snark  21stcenturyskills  schools  education  economics  21stcentury  competitiveness  satire  skills  humor  tcsnmy 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Seed: The True 21st Century Begins: From the fevered mind of Bruce Sterling and his alter-ego, Bruno Argento, a consideration of things ahead.
"The year to come is best approached as a learning opportunity. It offers a golden chance to bury our dead prejudices and learn how to properly feed the living. Once we stop shaking all over and scolding Americans, we will recognize the tremendous potential this new century offers the people of the world. The sun still shines, the grass still grows, we are still human. If we stopped pretending to be puppets of an invisible hand, we would not fret over the loss of the 20th century's strings. We might see that life is sweet."
brucesterling  brunoargento  crisis  copyright  futurism  italy  21stcentury  environment  economics  politics  science  future  aging  us  military  2009 
january 2009 by robertogreco
NAIS - Sustainable Schools - Sustainable Schools for the 21st Century [from 2005]
"NAIS believes that in order to survive and thrive in the 21st Century, schools should address sustainability on five dimensions. Below you'll find links to additional research and resources related to each of these areas of sustainability.
nais  sustainability  independentschools  schools  2005  education  planning  21stcentury  environment  finance  global  curriculum  leadership  management  administration  demographics  trends 
september 2008 by robertogreco

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