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Left by Rekka & Devine
[See also:
https://100r.co/pages/left.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QloUoqqhXGE ]

“Left is a distractionless writing tool with auto-complete, synonyms, writing statistics, markup navigation and a speed-reader.

The application is free and Open Source, its original purpose was to help Rekka with the writing of the upcoming novel Wiktopher.

Find out how to use it, view the guide.”

[via: https://usesthis.com/interviews/rekka.bell/ ]
writing  wordprocessors  applications  windows  linux  macos  mac  osx  opensource 
july 2019 by robertogreco
Whale
"Never been seen before, ‘Omnitasking’

Whale Space allows you to browse two windows in the same tab
and have different search results at the same time.

Simple way to sync between a desktop and a mobile You can import bookmarks as well as the web pages you have visited by syncing between a desktop and a mobile. What you need to do is just log in to Whale."



"New world
In the era of big data.
Everyone's goal nowadays is to explore the vast universe of information in a safe and secure way, without barriers.

Whale spaceship
“The spaceship looked like a huge whale” is a line from a science fiction that inspired us to name our browser. Like its name, we hope that Whale will become your spaceship sailing through the universe of information in the era of big data.

The start of a journey
We've been working on lowering the barriers so that everyone can easily use technologies in their daily lives and participate in improving the Whale browser.
Come along with us and join this journey to the new world."

[via: "South Korea's Newest Browser Is Beautifully Designed, But Will Anyone Use It?"
https://www.forbes.com/sites/elaineramirez/2017/06/11/naver-whale-line-south-koreas-newest-browser-is-beautifully-designed-but-will-anyone-use-it/#557f54e73411

"Arguably the coolest feature on Whale is “omnitasking” -- a split-screen feature that lets you browse two sites in the same tab, with an adjustable divider.

Koreans love Naver more than hipsters love Apple, but Whale is the latecomer to an already uphill battle."]
browsers  internet  online  web  browser  korea  windows  software  android  linux  ios  mac  osx  macos 
february 2019 by robertogreco
Mendeley - Reference Management Software & Researcher Network
"Access your library, everywhere
Add papers directly from your browser with a few clicks or import any documents from your desktop. Access your library from anywhere. Windows, Mac, Linux and all browsers.

Easy referencing
Generate references, citations and bibliographies in a whole range of journal styles with just a few clicks.

Build your Research network
30 million references and over 6 million researchers to discover. Our personalised recommendations makes staying up to date easy.

Career development and funding
172,785 science and technology jobs to advance your career. Grant information from over 2,000 organizations to launch your research project."
mac  oscx  windows  linux  ios  android  research  software  writing  srg  education  academia  applications 
november 2018 by robertogreco
The Ren'Py Visual Novel Engine
"Ren'Py is a visual novel engine – used by thousands of creators from around the world – that helps you use words, images, and sounds to tell interactive stories that run on computers and mobile devices. These can be both visual novels and life simulation games. The easy to learn script language allows anyone to efficiently write large visual novels, while its Python scripting is enough for complex simulation games.

Ren'Py is open source and free for commercial use.

Ren'Py has been used to create over 1,500 visual novels, games, and other works. You can find them at the official Ren'Py Games List, and the list of Games made with Ren'Py on itch.io."
games  gaming  gamedesign  design  ren'py  visualnovels  if  interactivefiction  lifesimulation  software  mac  osx  linux  chromeos  chrome  android  ios  applications  windows  gamemaking  classideas  writing  multiliteracies  opensource  onlinetoolkit  storytelling 
september 2018 by robertogreco
PureOS
"A user friendly, secure and freedom respecting OS for your daily usage.
With PureOS, you are the only one in control of your digital life.

Free/libre software
PureOS is a derivative of Debian GNU/Linux, with the best privacy-protecting software applications preinstalled.

Cutting-edge technology
With GNOME 3 and Wayland, enjoy fluid high-framerate videos, frame-perfect animations and better power management.

Security and Privacy
PureOS helps you surf the web safely, without being tracked by advertisers or marketers."
linux  privacy  security  free  pureos  debian  opensource 
june 2018 by robertogreco
Caves of Qud
"Caves of Qud is a science fantasy RPG & roguelike epic. It’s set in a far future that’s deeply simulated, richly cultured, and rife with sentient plants.

Now in Early Access.
Full release coming to PC, Linux, Mac, iOS, and Android in 2019.

Come inhabit an exotic world and chisel through a layer cake of thousand-year-old civilizations.

Play the role of a mutant from the salt-spangled jungles of Qud, or play as a true-kin descendant from one of the few remaining eco-domes: the toxic arboreta of Ekuemekiyye, the ice-sheathed arcology of Ibul, or the crustal mortars of Yawningmoon.

Do anything you can imagine.

• Dig a tunnel anywhere in the world.
• Purchase rare books from an albino ape mayor.
• Contract a fungal infection and grow glowing mushrooms on your hands.
• Charm a goat into joining you, then give him chain mail and a shotgun to equip.
• Clone yourself, mind-control the clone, hack off your own limbs, then eat them for sustenance."



"Caves of Qud weaves a handwritten narrative through rich physical, social, and historical simulations. The result is a hybrid handcrafted & procedurally-generated world where you can do just about anything.

• Assemble your character from over 70 mutations and defects, and 24 castes and kits — outfit yourself with wings, two heads, quills, four arms, flaming hands, or the power to clone yourself; it’s all the character diversity you could want.

• Explore procedurally-generated regions with some familiar locations — each world is nearly 1 million maps large.

• Dig through everything — don’t like the wall blocking your way? Dig through it with a pickaxe, or eat through it with your corrosive gas mutation, or melt it to lava. Yes, every wall has a melting point.

• Hack the limbs off monsters — every monster and NPC is as fully simulated as the player. That means they have levels, skills, equipment, faction allegiances, and body parts. So if you have a mutation that lets you, say, psionically dominate a spider, you can traipse through the world as a spider, laying webs and eating things.

• Pursue allegiances with over 60 factions — apes, crabs, robots, and highly entropic beings, just to name a few.

• Follow the plot to Barathrum the Old, a sentient cave bear who leads a sect of tinkers intent on restoring technological splendor to Qud.

• Learn the lore — there’s a story in every nook, from legendary items with fabled pasts to in-game history books written by plant historians. A novel’s worth of handwritten lore is knit into a procedurally-generated history that’s unique each game.

• Die — Caves of Qud is brutally difficult and deaths are permanent. Don’t worry, though — you can always roll a new character."
games  gaming  via:tealtan  videogames  roguelike  toplay  2019  android  ios  mac  osx  steam  windows  linux  edg 
may 2018 by robertogreco
La Scuola Open Source: Education and Research for cultural, social and technological Innovation
"We’re a community of digital artisans, makers, artists, designers, programmers, pirates, dreamers and innovators. We act together, testing new research, teaching, mentoring, co-living practices and models. We are involved with: research for public and private interest; teaching for learners, freelancers and managers of all ages. We design social and technological innovation.

☛ Non-linear learning paths
☛ Learning by doing
☛ New professions & skills
☛ A sharing space to grow up"

[from: http://lascuolaopensource.xyz/en/manifesto

"La Scuola Open Source is a space dedicated to social and technological innovation, where to perform educational activities, cultural performances and research projects:

☛ A hackerspace, where people with shared interest in the fields of craftsmanship, technology, science, visual arts, poetry, editing, robotics, domotics, biology, electronics and more can gather, socialize and/or cooperate;

☛ A re-use promotion center where obsolete technology is collected with the aim of promoting their smart upcycling;

☛ A FabLab: a small workshop offering customized digital fabrication services, equipped with a kit of fast prototyping tools (3d printing, laser cut, etc.)

♥ This opens up to new opportunities.

↓ We believe in

☆ Non-linearity
Founding principle of Plato’s accademia: “a free individual should not be forced, as a slave, to learn any discipline”, diametrically opposed to the monastic principle (and that of today’s school system), well represented by Benedict’s rule: “Speaking and teaching is a teacher’s job, staying silent and listening is what a disciple should do”.

☆ Co-design
Design as a “catalyst to collectively redefine our relationship with reality”, envisioning things for how they could be, altogether.

☆ Open work
The School’s structure allows us to build - by co-designing it - its teachings offering in an open way, allowing us to evolve each of its aspects with time.

☆ Multiverse
In modern physics, multiverse is a hypothesis postulating many co-existing universe beyond our space-time dimensions.

☆ Antifragility
The world around us is mutating and ever-changing. Upon this constant transformation we are building a model capable to adapt to mutations and making good of any erraticity and change happening. (N.Taleb, Antifragile).

☆ Learning by doing
We believe that teaching should be always combined with a continuous activity of research and exploration. Doing things and learning while doing, situational learning, are absolutely central in our vision and in the project we intend to realize.☆ Do it yourselfWe promote an alternative and aware approach to designing and production processes, stimulating self-production as a form of self-employment.

☆ Opensource
Open source, in its incremental logic, represents the blueprint for a collaborative, adaptive and recursive cultural system. We believe that such approach needs to be used in all fields of knowledge, so to enable possibilities for everyone.

☆ Hacker ethics
Linux’s big innovation was not the Operating System, but the open social dynamic that was set up to make that project happen.

☆ Sharing
We welcome people, ideas and projects to share space, knowledge and values. Through a constant and mutual exchange, both a collective consciousness and a better informative quality can be quickly developed.

☆ Osmosis
La Scuola Open Source intends to facilitate and generate osmotic processes between experiences and skills, aiming to increase everyone’s intrinsic value for the community.

↓ Our value proposition

☛ Access to future, a better one
We therefore need to train ourselves, learn by doing, fail, consult with others, cooperate, work on projects with a tangible impact on the real world.

☛ Customized and non-linear learning paths
We believe that people need to be pushed to ask questions, curiosity being the engine of progress. We therefore want to apply the open source approach to humanities as well, promoting a transversal and peer-to-peer approach to the learning topic.

☛ Spaces for social aggregation to learn in a cooperative context
It is necessary to restore sharing spaces and practices, re-discovering the ability to build relationships and team up to achieve common objectives, leveraging on education and learning as vehicles for a social and economical renewing process. Spaces where to discover and cultivate curiosity, turning it into the engine to each one’s learning path, a self-built path within a virtuous system, providing input and stimula on several channels and levels.

☛ New professional figures
Tomorrow new jobs will rise, while others could disappear. Things change, therefore we need to change things. We have to reform this educational sector in a generative way, keeping in mind the context’s evolution into account and making it mutate within time, continuously adapting."
lcproject  openstudioproject  altgdp  learning  communities  community  design  pirates  nonlinear  learningbydoing  unschooling  deschooling  sharing  space  italy  glvo  italia  bari  non-linear  opensource  linux  osmosis  hacker  hackerethics  antifragility  multiverse  co-design  resuse  hackerspaces  art  technology  alinear  linearity 
april 2018 by robertogreco
PINEBOOK – PINE64
"Light and Thin 64-bit ARM based Open Source Notebook
PINEBOOK is an 11.6″ or 14″ notebook powered by the same Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-Bit Processor used in our popular PINE A64 Single Board Computer. It is lightweight and comes with a full size keyboard and large multi-touch touchpad for students and makers.

As a new open source platform, Pinebook development is an ongoing process and represents a great opportunity to get involved with computing on a different level, to customise and personalise the portable computer experience, to understand what is going on beneath the surface. Your input can help shape and define what a Pinebook can be."
hardware  openspource  linux  laptops 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Krita | Digital Painting. Creative Freedom.
"Krita is a professional FREE and open source painting program. It is made by artists that want to see affordable art tools for everyone.
• concept art
• texture and matte painters
• illustrations and comics"
opensource  via:lukeneff  applications  windows  linux  mac  osx  illustration  painting  software 
february 2018 by robertogreco
What free software is so good you can't believe it's available for free? : AskReddit
"I compiled a list of all the software in this thread that got a 1000+ score (in order from top to bottom), along with a short description of each.

Over 1000 upvotes:

Google Maps: Navigation app - https://www.google.com/maps
Blender: 3D modeling software - https://www.blender.org/
VLC: Video player - https://www.videolan.org/index.html
The Windows Snipping Tool: Screen capture tool - https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4027213/windows-open-snipping-tool-and-take-a-screenshot
Space Engine: Space exploration simulator - http://spaceengine.org/
Wikipedia: Online encyclopedia - https://www.wikipedia.org/
MuseScore: Music notation software - https://musescore.org/en
Audacity: Audio editing software - https://www.audacityteam.org/
Handbrake: video converter - https://handbrake.fr/
Zotero: Reference manager - https://www.zotero.org/
Desmos.com: Online Calculator - https://www.desmos.com/
Calibre: ebook manager - https://calibre-ebook.com/download
Notepad++: Text Editor - https://notepad-plus-plus.org/
stud.io: Lego simulator - https://studio.bricklink.com/v2/build/studio.page
Search Everything: Instant file search software - https://www.voidtools.com/
LaTeX: Document software - https://www.latex-project.org/
http://archive.org/: Contains music, movies, books, software, games, and webpages - http://archive.org/
Linux/Apache/Postgres/Gcc: Various Linux based OS’s, webservers, compilers, etc. - https://www.linux.org/
Discord: Chat and Communication software - https://discordapp.com/
OBS Studio: Streaming and Recording software - https://obsproject.com/
Krita: Digital design - https://krita.org/en/
R: Statistics software - https://www.r-project.org/
pfSense: Firewall software - https://www.pfsense.org/
FreeNAS: File server software - http://www.freenas.org/
Gimp: Digital design - https://www.gimp.org/
OpenSCAD: 3D Model scripting software - http://www.openscad.org/
This list - https://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/comments/7x639l/what_free_software_is_so_good_you_cant_believe/
Malwarebytes: Malware protection - https://www.malwarebytes.com/
Unity: Game design software - https://unity3d.com/
https://www.draw.io/: Online diagram software - https://www.draw.io/
Paint.NET: Image design - https://www.getpaint.net/
Draftsight: Free CAD - https://www.3ds.com/products-services/draftsight-cad-software/free-download/
7Zip: File archiving - http://www.7-zip.org/
Plex: Media storage access - https://www.plex.tv/
Libre Office: Document editing suite - https://www.libreoffice.org/
KeePass: Password manager - https://keepass.info/
DaVinci Resolve: Video color correcting/editing - https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve/
Inkscape: Vector art software - https://inkscape.org/en/
Google's Apps: Google’s document suite (Docs, Sheets, Gmail, etc) - https://www.google.com/
Duolingo: Language learning - https://www.duolingo.com/
Darktable: Photo workflow a la lightroom - https://www.musicpd.org/ and https://www.darktable.org/
MPD/Mopidy: F/OSS music player daemon - https://www.mopidy.com/
Doom shareware: A classic game - a 3.5' floppy disk


Over 150 upvotes:

fxSolver/Cymath/Mathway - Math/engineering/chemistry problem solving - https://www.fxsolver.com/ and https://www.cymath.com/ and https://www.mathway.com/Algebra
Recuva: Restores deleted files - https://www.ccleaner.com/recuva
Python: A programming language for quickly writing scripts - https://www.python.org/
foobar2000: Freeware audio player - https://www.foobar2000.org/
Robin Hood: Stock trading app - https://www.robinhood.com/
Flux: Day/Night cycle on monitor color/brightness - https://justgetflux.com/
Fusion 360: Free 3D CAD/CAM design software - https://www.autodesk.com/products/fusion-360/students-teachers-educators
Steam: Platform for game distribution - http://store.steampowered.com/
Shazam: App that tells you what song is playing - https://www.shazam.com/
Audio Router: Sound routing - https://github.com/audiorouterdev/audio-router
Arduino: Open-source electronics platform (software is free) - https://www.arduino.cc/
LMMS: Music studio - https://lmms.io/
Kodi: Entertainment center software - https://kodi.tv/
Git: Version control system - https://git-scm.com/
REAPER: Audio workstation - https://www.reaper.fm/
Greenshot: Print screen tool - http://getgreenshot.org/
Irfanview: Image viewer, editor, organiser and converter - http://www.irfanview.com/
TeamViewer: Remote desktop software - https://www.teamviewer.us/
Firefox: Web browser - https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/new/
Alarm Clock on Cell Phones: Alarm clock on cell phones - On your cell phone
Wireshark: Open source packet analyze - https://www.wireshark.org/
Disk Fan: Visually see how much space is being used on a volume - http://www.diskspacefan.com/
Beyond Compare: Compare two files/directories: whole tree's and directories - https://www.scootersoftware.com/
VNCServer/Viewer: Remote desktop software - https://www.realvnc.com/en/connect/download/vnc/
Ubuntu: A Linux OS - https://www.ubuntu.com/
WinDirStat: Graphical disk usage analyzer - https://windirstat.net/
Oracle VirtualBox: Open-source hypervisor - https://www.virtualbox.org/
PuTTy: An all in one protocol terminal - https://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/latest.html
Visual Studio Code: Code editor - https://code.visualstudio.com/
Reddit: This website - https://www.reddit.com/


EDIT: WOW! This is by far my largest post ever and my first gold; thank you!!!



EDIT 2: I just updated the list to include any that had over 150 upvotes (with the exception of Reddit at 145, but I thought it deserved an honorable mention!). Thanks again everyone for all the support :)"
software  free  lists  onlinetoolkit  computing  mac  osx  windows  linux  online  web  internet 
february 2018 by robertogreco
The Sheep's Meow
"EXPOSURE is a game of remaining invisible to both yourself and to your predators. Get in a state of flow with an elegant camouflage mechanic, dynamic difficulty, branching levels, and generative soundscapes, with a different experience each time you play. The controls are simple: analog stick to move around, and press any button to switch between black and white. Camouflaging yourself in the environment is your only protection from the predators. Take a different path each time you play, with branching levels taking you across different environments based on how you play. Evolve each step of the way. What will ultimately become of you and your kind?

History

Inspired by studies of the peppered moth (Biston betularia) over the past 200 years.

Features

• Featuring an elegant camouflage mechanic that'll teach you to see without looking.
• A distinctive visual style that seamlessly mixes digital art and traditional media.
• Generate minimal music with soundscapes based on your gameplay.
• Get in a state of flow in levels that progress with dynamic difficulty adjustment."

[See also:
http://thesheepsmeow.com/
https://vimeo.com/116310560
https://vimeo.com/114841248 ]
games  videogames  gaming  via:tealtan  mac  linux  osx  wiiu  windows 
december 2016 by robertogreco
elementary blog — Switching from macOS: The Basics
"We’ve been getting a ton of traffic at elementary.io and hearing a lot of chatter from Apple users after the underwhelming MacBook Pro event last week—mainly that Apple has abandoned the “Pro” market for which so many of their products are named. With this week-ish-long series, I’d love to show you how elementary OS is great for both casual computer users and professional developers. Particularly those coming from or more familiar with macOS.
Today I’m kicking off with: The Basics."
mac  osx  linux  elementaryos  os 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Qubes OS Project
"What is Qubes OS?

Qubes OS is a security-oriented operating system (OS). The OS is the software that runs all the other programs on a computer. Some examples of popular OSes are Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Android, and iOS. Qubes is free and open-source software (FOSS). This means that everyone is free to use, copy, and change the software in any way. It also means that the source code is openly available so others can contribute to and audit it.

Why is OS security important?

Most people use an operating system like Windows or OS X on their desktop and laptop computers. These OSes are popular because they tend to be easy to use and usually come pre-installed on the computers people buy. However, they present problems when it comes to security. For example, you might open an innocent-looking email attachment or website, not realizing that you’re actually allowing malware (malicious software) to run on your computer. Depending on what kind of malware it is, it might do anything from showing you unwanted advertisements to logging your keystrokes to taking over your entire computer. This could jeopardize all the information stored on or accessed by this computer, such as health records, confidential communications, or thoughts written in a private journal. Malware can also interfere with the activities you perform with your computer. For example, if you use your computer to conduct financial transactions, the malware might allow its creator to make fraudulent transactions in your name.

Aren’t antivirus programs and firewalls enough?

Unfortunately, conventional security approaches like antivirus programs and (software and/or hardware) firewalls are no longer enough to keep out sophisticated attackers. For example, nowadays it’s common for malware creators to check to see if their malware is recognized by any popular antivirus programs. If it’s recognized, they scramble their code until it’s no longer recognizable by the antivirus programs, then send it out. The best antivirus programs will subsequently get updated once the antivirus programmers discover the new threat, but this usually occurs at least a few days after the new attacks start to appear in the wild. By then, it’s typically too late for those who have already been compromised. In addition, bugs are inevitably discovered in the common software we all use (such as our web browsers), and no antivirus program or firewall can prevent all of these bugs from being exploited.

How does Qubes OS provide security?

Qubes takes an approach called security by compartmentalization, which allows you to compartmentalize the various parts of your digital life into securely isolated compartments called qubes.

This approach allows you to keep the different things you do on your computer securely separated from each other in isolated qubes so that one qube getting compromised won’t affect the others. For example, you might have one qube for visiting untrusted websites and a different qube for doing online banking. This way, if your untrusted browsing qube gets compromised by a malware-laden website, your online banking activities won’t be at risk. Similarly, if you’re concerned about malicious email attachments, Qubes can make it so that every attachment gets opened in its own single-use disposable qube. In this way, Qubes allows you to do everything on the same physical computer without having to worry about a single successful cyberattack taking down your entire digital life in one fell swoop.

Moreover, all of these isolated qubes are integrated into a single, usable system. Programs are isolated in their own separate qubes, but all windows are displayed in a single, unified desktop environment with unforgeable colored window borders so that you can easily identify windows from different security levels. Common attack vectors like network cards and USB controllers are isolated in their own hardware qubes while their functionality is preserved through secure networking, firewalls, and USB device management. Integrated file and clipboard copy and paste operations make it easy to work across various qubes without compromising security. The innovative Template system separates software installation from software use, allowing qubes to share a root filesystem without sacrificing security (and saving disk space, to boot). Qubes even allows you to sanitize PDFs and images in a few clicks. Users concerned about privacy will appreciate the integration of Whonix with Qubes, which makes it easy to use Tor securely, while those concerned about physical hardware attacks will benefit from Anti Evil Maid.

How does Qubes OS compare to using a “live CD” OS?

Booting your computer from a live CD (or DVD) when you need to perform sensitive activities can certainly be more secure than simply using your main OS, but this method still preserves many of the risks of conventional OSes. For example, popular live OSes (such as Tails and other Linux distributions) are still monolithic in the sense that all software is still running in the same OS. This means, once again, that if your session is compromised, then all the data and activities performed within that same session are also potentially compromised.

How does Qubes OS compare to running VMs in a conventional OS?

Not all virtual machine software is equal when it comes to security. You may have used or heard of VMs in relation to software like VirtualBox or VMware Workstation. These are known as “Type 2” or “hosted” hypervisors. (The hypervisor is the software, firmware, or hardware that creates and runs virtual machines.) These programs are popular because they’re designed primarily to be easy to use and run under popular OSes like Windows (which is called the host OS, since it “hosts” the VMs). However, the fact that Type 2 hypervisors run under the host OS means that they’re really only as secure as the host OS itself. If the host OS is ever compromised, then any VMs it hosts are also effectively compromised.

By contrast, Qubes uses a “Type 1” or “bare metal” hypervisor called Xen. Instead of running inside an OS, Type 1 hypervisors run directly on the “bare metal” of the hardware. This means that an attacker must be capable of subverting the hypervisor itself in order to compromise the entire system, which is vastly more difficult.

Qubes makes it so that multiple VMs running under a Type 1 hypervisor can be securely used as an integrated OS. For example, it puts all of your application windows on the same desktop with special colored borders indicating the trust levels of their respective VMs. It also allows for things like secure copy/paste operations between VMs, securely copying and transferring files between VMs, and secure networking between VMs and the Internet."
qubesos  os  linux  privacy  security 
october 2016 by robertogreco
Insular by Joshua Kingsbury
"Relax. Find nearly invisible flocks of boxes.
7 stages to reach paradise. Watch out.

Touch a color you shouldn't and the game will reset.

Press P or ESC to bring up the in-game menu. This will display your progress and available settings.

If you desire accompanying sound, I recommend playing some music that you find relaxing before you begin. The game gets a bit tense the farther you go. ;)

This was an exercise in silent game design.
Over a dozen color schemes to choose from!!
(Both for accessibility, and conversely, varied difficulty)"
silent  games  gaming  videogames  edg  srg  windows  mac  osx  linux  joshuakingsbury  free 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Fruits of a Feather by Samurai Punk
"Fly around an island collecting fruit in this relaxing, dream-like exploration game.

Played best with gamepad, but also supports keyboard controls."
low-polygon  low-polyart  low-polygonart  games  gaming  videogames  edg  srg  indie  samuraipunk  free  windows  mac  osx  linux 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Inside the Void by 3D Methods
"Alien structures have been sighted on a remote planet. Several spacecraft have been sent to investigate the structures, but all communication with the crew has been lost.

Your mission is to investigate the planet and search for the lost crew.

Inside the Void is a first-person exploration game in which you search an alien planet and its seven structures. Each structure is a gateway to a void. You will encounter log entries that offer a glimpse into the fate of the lost crew members.

Inside the Void is free, but any donations are greatly appreciated.

Controls: Mouse and WASD / E to interact / Shift to Sprint

Update 1.01 - Added option for invert vertical mouse. Added sprint.
Update 1.02 - Minor gameplay fixes

Developed by Jacob A. Medina
https://twitter.com/3dmethods "

[via: http://warpdoor.com/2016/07/30/u/ ]
games  gaming  videogames  indie  jacobmedina  2016  edg  srg  windows  mac  osx  linux  free 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Liberal Arts Degree to Software Industry — Medium
"1. get comfortable using linux …

2. get comfortable using a version control system …

3. learn to use a command line text/code editor …

4. learn a high-level, dynamic, interpreted programming language …

5. learn a low-level, statically typed, compiled programming language (without a garbage collector) …

6. build your own (static) website from scratch …

7. contribute to an open source project …

8. get familiar with test driven development (TDD) …

9. understand how to use a (relational) database …

10. go deep in one particular technology stack"
liberarts  coding  software  linux  programming  2016  paulcarduner 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Crouton: Turn Your Chromebook into far more than a “glorified web browser” | AndroidAuthority
"Congratulations! You now have a very capable operating system installed on your Chromebook. Video/photo editing, coding, web development, audio production, advanced file management, and office work are only a shortcut away. You can also perform these tasks while offline, unlike Chrome OS, which requires a constant internet connection to be truly effective (though there are a growing number of offline apps even with Chrome OS).

The moral of the story is: certain operating systems are suitable for specific tasks. Chrome OS is by far the best platform for casual computing, while Linux has all the tools a professional could ever need. By installing Ubuntu on your Chromebook you get the best of both worlds and have transformed a relatively inexpensive laptop into a very capable and flexible piece of hardware.

It is important to note that, while the aforementioned tasks require far less capable hardware on Linux than competing platforms, I highly recommend installing Linux on a Chromebook with at least 4 GB of RAM, 32 GB of storage, and an Intel CPU (preferably a Core i3 or better) for the best overall experience. Any Chromebook users out there? Do you utilize the power of Linux, or is Chrome OS alone more than enough to suite your needs?"
chromebooks  chromeos  linux  srg  ubuntu  2016  crouton 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Reverting to Type: A Reader’s Story |
"It did become my thing. I transferred to what we thought of as the University of Alabama, the one in Tuscaloosa, largely because it had a better English department. I double-majored in English and history, and at some point decided — what considerations went into the decision I no longer remember — that I wanted to go to graduate school to study more literature. So I attended the University of Virginia. I developed a historical sense — my love for Browne’s prose led me to spend most of my time in the seventeenth century, until a relatively late encounter with the poetry of W. H. Auden made a modernist of me — amassed a repertoire of critical gestures, learned to invoke the names and terms of High Theory in the proper ways and at the proper times. I was initiated into the academic guild; I became a professor.

It wasn’t always easy, of course. In my last weeks as an undergraduate one of my professors had taken me aside and whispered to me the sacred names of Barthes and Derrida, and told me I should make fuller acquaintance with them. I dutifully wrote down the names and immediately forgot about them. Since none of this Theory stuff had previously been mentioned to me in my undergraduate career, how important could it be? So when I plunged into my first graduate classes — including a theoretical survey in which we read Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Jung, Gramsci, Georg Lukács, Horkheimer and Adorno, Husserl, Heidegger, Ricoeur, Jakobson, Althusser, Brooks, Frye, de Beauvoir, Kenneth Burke, and, yes, Barthes and Derrida, among others — I was immediately transformed from a confident critic-in-the-making to a lost lamb, baahing reproachfully, petulantly.

Ten weeks or so into my first semester I decided that I just couldn’t cut it and needed to drop out. But I was a newlywed, and had carried my bride hundreds of miles from her family, set her down in a strange town, and effectively forced her to hunt for compartatively menial jobs, all to support this great academic endeavor of mine. I couldn’t bring myself to tell her how miserable and incompetent and just plain lost I was.

Our apartment in Charlottesville had a small windowless room that I used for a study. One evening after dinner I went in and closed the door and tried to sort through the vast pile of photocopied theoretical essays I had bought at Kinko’s on the first day of class. (We could violate copyright in those days, too.) But it was useless. I could scarcely bear even to look at the stuff. My professor had copied from his own well-used books, and every essay was full of confident underlinings and annotations that seemed by their very presence to judge me and find me wanting. I couldn’t bring myself to read another word.

My eyes wandered to a nearby bookshelf, and were caught for a moment by the glit of a gold cardboard box: it contained the three volumes of the Ballantine mass-market version of The Lord of the Rings. I had never read Tolkien: I was a science-fiction guy, not a fantasy guy. But of course I knew that The Trilogy (as I thought of it) was important, and that someday I ought to get to it. Almost thoughtlessly, I picked up the first volume and began to read.

When bedtime rolled around I set the book down and emerged from the sanctuary. “How’d it go tonight?” Teri asked.

I said, “It went well.”

The next evening I re-entered the study, under the pretense of continuing my academic labors with all due seriousness, and picked up where I had left off in the story. For the next week or so, though during the days I went to classes and did generally what I was supposed to do, I did none of the reading or writing I was assigned. I got further and further behind. I didn’t care; I was somewhere else and glad to be somewhere else. Teri seemed pleased with my scholarly discipline, as each evening I washed the dishes, gave her a kiss, and closed the study door behind me.

When I finished The Lord of the Rings I drew a deep breath. I felt more sound and whole than I had felt in weeks, maybe months. But, to my own surprise, I did not conclude that all that academic crap was a waste of time and I should do something else with my life, something that gave me time to read lots of fantasy novels. Instead, I experienced a strange refreshment, almost an exhilaration. My confusion and frustration seemed like small afflictions, conquerable adversaries. Barthes and Derrida weren’t so fearsome after all. I could do this.

I don’t believe that I was thinking, “Literary theory is as nothing in comparison to the power of Mordor!” Or, “If Frodo can carry that Ring to the Cracks of Doom I can write this paper on Paul Ricoeur!” Rather, I was just benefiting from spending some time away from my anxieties. We had been too intimate and needed separation. So I resumed my studies in a far better frame of mind; as a result, I did better work. I completed my doctorate and began my career as a teacher, but I didn’t forget the debt I owed to that week I spent in Tolkien’s world."



"In a sense I am only talking here about expanding my repertoire of analogies, my ability to make illuminating and meaningful comparisons. For many years now Douglas Hofstadter, drawing on the work of the mathematician Stanislaw Ulam, has been convinced that the secret to creating artificial intelligence lies in teaching machines to recognize analogies. (Ulam says somewhere that it’s all about “as”: we see marks on a piece of wood pulp as a portrait of a beloved child, a cairn of stones as a monument to a dead chieftain.) Similar principles underlie the methods of Google Translate, which collects an enormous corpus of sentences and then tries to match your input to something in that corpus, and Apple’s “digital personal assistant,” Siri. Siri can’t parse what you say to her unless she can connect to the network, which undertakes a comparison of your utterance to other utterances on record. All this might be called brute-force analogizing, but it seems to me that my own understanding develops as I pursue the same method, though with far less force and (I hope) less brutishness.

In one of his most beautiful poems, Richard Wilbur writes, “Odd that a thing is most itself when likened.” And this is true no matter the thing: a book becomes more fully itself when we see both how it resembles and how is differs from other books; one discipline of study takes on its proper hues only when we see its relations to other disciplines that stand close to it or very far away. My repertoire of analogies is my toolbox, or my console of instruments, by which I comprehend and navigate the world. It can’t be too large; every addition helps, at least a bit. And that’s why I’m thankful for my gradual recovery of the books I adored, and thoughts I lovingly entertained, when I was forty years younger."
alanjacobs  howweread  reading  2015  analogies  metaphor  text  pleasurereading  richardwilbur  harukimurukami  jrrtolkein  thelordoftherings  stainslawulam  loreneisley  sciencefiction  understanding  literarycriticism  genrefiction  fiction  literature  academia  writing  howwewrite  howwelearn  books  jacquesderrida  rolandbarthes  whauden  sirthomasbrowne  williamfaulkner  nealstephenson  joycecaroloates  twocultures  cpsnow  jamesgleick  linux  learning  canon  digressions  amateurism  dabbling  listening  communication  howweteach  teaching  education  silos 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Telegram Messenger
"Telegram is a cloud-based mobile and desktop messaging app with a focus on security and speed."
messaging  application  ios  android  applications  mac  windowsphone  ipad  iphone  windows  linux  web 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Why I’m Saying Goodbye to Apple, Google and Microsoft — Backchannel — Medium
"I’d periodically played with Linux and other alternatives on my PC over the years, but always found the exercise tedious and, in the end, unworkable. But I never stopped paying attention to what brilliant people like Richard Stallman and Cory Doctorow and others were saying, namely that we were leading, and being led, down a dangerous path. In a conversation with Cory one day, I asked him about his use of Linux as his main PC operating system. He said it was important to do what he believed in—and, by the way, it worked fine.

Could I do less, especially given that I’d been public in my worries about the trends?

So about three years ago, I installed the Ubuntu variant — among the most popular and well-supported — on a Lenovo ThinkPad laptop, and began using it as my main system. For a month or so, I was at sea, making keystroke errors and missing a few Mac applications on which I’d come to rely. But I found Linux software that worked at least well enough, and sometimes better than its Mac and Windows counterparts.

And one day I realized that my fingers and brain had fully adjusted to the new system. Now, when I used a Mac, I was a bit confused."



"As mobile computing has become more dominant, I’ve had to rethink everything on that platform, too. I still consider the iPhone the best combination of software and hardware any company has offered, but Apple’s control-freakery made it a nonstarter. I settled on Android, which was much more open and readily modified.

But Google’s power and influence worry me, too, even though I still trust it more than many other tech companies. Google’s own Android is excellent, but the company has made surveillance utterly integral to the use of its software. And app developers take disgusting liberties, collecting data by the petabyte and doing god-knows-what with it. (Security experts I trust say the iPhone is more secure by design than most Android devices.) How could I walk my talk in the mobile age?"



"So I keep looking for ways to further reduce my dependence on the central powers. One of my devices, an older tablet running Cyanogenmod, is a test bed for an even more Google-free existence.

It’s good enough for use at home, and getting better as I find more free software — most of it via the “F-Droid” download library — that handles what I need. I’ve even installed a version of Ubuntu’s new tablet OS, but it’s not ready, as the cliche goes, for prime time. Maybe the Firefox OS will be a player.

But I’ve given up the idea that free software and open hardware will become the norm for consumers anytime soon, if ever—even though free and open-source software is at the heart of the Internet’s back end.

If too few people are willing to try, though, the default will win. And the defaults are Apple, Google and Microsoft.

Our economic system is adapting to community-based solutions, slowly but surely. But let’s face it: we collectively seem to prefer convenience to control, at least for the moment. I’m convinced more and more people are learning about the drawbacks of the bargain we’ve made, wittingly or not, and someday we may collectively call it Faustian.

I keep hoping more hardware vendors will see the benefit of helping their customers free themselves of proprietary control. This is why I was so glad to see Dell, a company once joined at the hip with Microsoft, offer a Linux laptop. If the smaller players in the industry don’t themselves enjoy being pawns of software companies and mobile carriers, they have options, too. They can help us make better choices.

Meanwhile, I’ll keep encouraging as many people as possible to find ways to take control for themselves. Liberty takes some work, but it’s worth the effort. I hope you’ll consider embarking on this journey with me."
apple  google  microsoft  dangilmour  linux  opensource  2015  community  hardware  dell  cyanogenmod  ios  android  windows  mac  osx  f-droid  ubuntu  firefoxos  firefox  os  mozilla  lenovo  richardstallman  corydoctorow  libreoffice 
march 2015 by robertogreco
ubermix
"The ubermix is an all-free, specially built, Linux-based operating system designed from the ground up with the needs of education in mind. Built by educators with an eye towards student and teacher empowerment, ubermix takes all the complexity out of student devices by making them as reliable and easy-to-use as a cell phone, without sacrificing the power and capabilities of a full operating system. With a turn-key, 5 minute installation, 20 second quick recovery mechanism, and more than 60 free applications pre-installed, ubermix turns whatever hardware you have into a powerful device for learning."

[via: https://twitter.com/bengrey/status/567056041675096065 ]
linux  os  ubermix  education 
february 2015 by robertogreco
elementary OS
"Community Driven.
elementary has a single goal: to provide the best possible experience for our community. We're driven by a desire to be better, not by a paycheck. Contributors aren't profit-maximizers, they're purpose-maximizers.

Transparent and Open.
We believe in the power of open source and global collaboration. That means anyone can download, use, modify, and contribute to the code we've written to bring their ideas to life. The code is developed in the open, meaning it's available for review, scrutiny, and improvement by tens of thousands of developers all around the world. All before it hits your system.

Beautiful and Usable.
elementary is crafted by designers and developers who believe that computers can be easy, fun, and gorgeous. By putting design first, we ensure we're not compromising on quality or usability.

Modern Computing.
elementary OS is a free replacement for Windows on the PC and OS X on the Mac. It comes with what you'd expect, like a fast web browser and an app store with thousands of apps. Plus some things you may not expect, like free updates and no known viruses.

Speedy
Luna has been engineered from the ground up to be light on its toes. It starts up quickly, logs in instantly, and uses the bare minimum of resources so that your apps enjoy a speed boost as well. And with Luna, you get the same Linux foundation chosen for the world’s fastest supercomputers.

Full of Features
When you install elementary, you’re not just installing an operating system. You’re installing an excellent suite of custom tailored apps that let you get right to business. Easily surf the web, check your email, listen to music, and tackle everyday tasks or pleasures."

[via: https://twitter.com/davecormier/status/567052161247227904 ]
os  elementaryos  linux 
february 2015 by robertogreco
N O D E: HOW TO CREATE A HANDHELD LINUX TERMINAL
"This tutorial will teach you how to create your own handheld linux terminal with built in screen, QWERTY thumb keyboard and battery. It has four passive USB ports for expansion and extra connectivity. It’s super portable and is about the size of a Nintendo DS (if slightly thicker).

I initially made it because I thought it’d be cool to fit down into such a small form-factor, but it also has some interesting purposes. It’s basically a full handheld linux system that can do almost everything a normal sized computer can do. It’s not going to destroy any benchmark tests, so it’s best suited to command line stuff. Since this is the case, it’s actually a pretty good tool for learning the command line interface as well as basic scripting. The keyboard has all the special characters you need which is really handy.

Almost all the design choices here are made entirely out of necessity for space. If I had a chance to make a custom keyboard and case, it’d be alot sleeker. Considering it’s a bunch of off the shelf stuff, I think it turned out pretty nicely."
diy  electronics  linux  raspberrypi  2015  chrisrobinson  projectideas 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Syncthing
"Syncthing replaces proprietary sync and cloud services with something open, trustworthy and decentralized. Your data is your data alone and you deserve to choose where it is stored, if it is shared with some third party and how it's transmitted over the Internet."

[via: https://ind.ie/blog/focus/ ]
sync  syncing  syncthing  dropbox  data  cloud  tools  onlinetoolkit  mac  osx  windows  linux  open  opensource  android 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Pandoc - About pandoc
"If you need to convert files from one markup format into another, pandoc is your swiss-army knife. Pandoc can convert documents in markdown, reStructuredText, textile, HTML, DocBook, LaTeX, MediaWiki markup, OPML, or Haddock markup to

• HTML formats: XHTML, HTML5, and HTML slide shows using Slidy, reveal.js, Slideous, S5, or DZSlides.
• Word processor formats: Microsoft Word docx, OpenOffice/LibreOffice ODT, OpenDocument XML
• Ebooks: EPUB version 2 or 3, FictionBook2
• Documentation formats: DocBook, GNU TexInfo, Groff man pages, Haddock markup
• Outline formats: OPML
• TeX formats: LaTeX, ConTeXt, LaTeX Beamer slides
• PDF via LaTeX
• Lightweight markup formats: Markdown, reStructuredText, AsciiDoc, MediaWiki markup, Emacs Org-Mode, Textile
• Custom formats: custom writers can be written in lua.

Pandoc understands a number of useful markdown syntax extensions, including document metadata (title, author, date); footnotes; tables; definition lists; superscript and subscript; strikeout; enhanced ordered lists (start number and numbering style are significant); running example lists; delimited code blocks with syntax highlighting; smart quotes, dashes, and ellipses; markdown inside HTML blocks; and inline LaTeX. If strict markdown compatibility is desired, all of these extensions can be turned off."

[via: http://text-patterns.thenewatlantis.com/2013/10/writing-big.html ]
conversion  markdown  markup  pdf  latex  html  xhtml  software  mac  osx  windows  linux 
october 2013 by robertogreco
How Apple Killed the Linux Desktop and Why That Doesn't Matter | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com
"“Many people who were talking about Free Software are the people talking about the open web now,” de Icaza says.

One of them is Stormy Peters, the former executive director of the GNOME Foundation. She’s still on the GNOME Foundation board an like de Icaza she still keeps some Linux machines around. But as director of websites and developer engagement at the Mozilla Foundation, her focus is now on the open web.

“The reason I’m personally at Mozilla is that I saw a lot of websites that weren’t designed with the principles of free software,” she says. Thanks to AJAX and HTML5, the web has become the dominant platform for applications she says.

In what ways can the principles of free software be applied to the web? Peters says one of the most important aspects of open source software is that you, or someone you trust, can examine an application’s source code and see what it’s doing."
stormtpeters  xfce  gnome  software  freesoftware  mozilla  2012  applications  html5  webapps  ajax  opensource  mac  osx  apple  linux 
august 2012 by robertogreco
FreedomBox Foundation
"What is FreedomBox?

Email and telecommunications that protects privacy and resists eavesdropping

A publishing platform that resists oppression and censorship.

An organizing tool for democratic activists in hostile regimes.

An emergency communication network in times of crisis.

FreedomBox will put in people's own hands and under their own control encrypted voice and text communication, anonymous publishing, social networking, media sharing, and (micro)blogging.

Much of the software already exists: onion routing, encryption, virtual private networks, etc. There are tiny, low-watt computers known as "plug servers" to run this software. The hard parts is integrating that technology, distributing it, and making it easy to use without expertise. The harder part is to decentralize it so users have no need to rely on and trust centralized infrastructure."
decentralized  decentralizedcomputing  decentralization  infrastructure  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  mediasharing  encryption  eavesdropping  telecommunications  email  oppression  censorship  microblogging  publishing  ebenmoglen  activism  hardware  technology  linux  security  freedom  privacy  opensource  software  freedombox 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Pure Data — PD Community Site
"Pd (aka Pure Data) is a real-time graphical programming environment for audio, video, and graphical processing. It is the third major branch of the family of patcher programming languages known as Max (Max/FTS, ISPW Max, Max/MSP, jMax, etc.) originally developed by Miller Puckette and company at IRCAM. The core of Pd is written and maintained by Miller Puckette and includes the work of many developers, making the whole package very much a community effort.

Pd is free software and can be downloaded either as an OS-specific package, source package, or directly from CVS. Pd was written to be multi-platform and therefore is quite portable; versions exist for Win32, IRIX, GNU/Linux, BSD, and MacOS X running on anything from a PocketPC to an old Mac to a brand new PC. Pd can run on smarphones thanks to projects like libpd and RjDj. It is possible to write externals and patches that work with Max/MSP and Pd using flext and cyclone."
millerpuckette  srg  edg  osx  mac  linux  scratch  graphicprogramming  sound  music  video  art  coding  software  programming  audio  opensource  pd  puredata 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Gmvault: gmail backup
"Backup all your emails on disk.
Use the full sync mode to backup your entire gmail account in a unique directory. Your email backup repository can then be easily tar and moved from one machine to the other.

Update your backup in minutes.
Gmvault can run a quick sync mode regularly (ie. every day) to keep your backup up to date.`

Restore emails in any Gmail acc.
With the restore command Gmvault can recreate your gmail mailboxes in any Gmail account. All attributes such as Gmail labels are preserved and recreated. With restore, you will recover your Gmail account exactly as it was.

Handle all Gmail IMAP hiccups.
Even being the world best ever email service, Gmail and especially its IMAP service is not without bugs. Gmvault handles all these issues to provide the smoothest experience to the user. Gmvault deals with the most common issues and always let the user with an uncorrupted email database."
windows  osx  mac  linux  google  data  restore  software  python  opensource  backup  gmail  gmvault 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Jolicloud - Joli OS
"Joli OS is a free and easy way to turn any computer up to 10 years old into a cool new cloud device. Get on the Web and instantly connect to all your Web apps, files and services using the computer you already own. You may never need to buy a new computer again.<br />
<br />
It’s easy. Just download Joli OS. It installs in just 10 minutes."
software  free  opensource  freeware  os  jolicloud  joli  jolios  linux  cloud  web  netbooks 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Beyond the “smart city” | Urbanscale
"These are not the “smart cities” IBM, Oracle and Cisco want to deploy — or, more properly, to sell to municipal bodies the world over. They require neither greenfield sites nor the patronage of a paternalist government. These are simply the cities we already live in, and love, endowed with all the new capabilities and potentials an emerging technology can offer. If this is to be a century of networked cities, as the consultants and thinktanks keep telling us it will be, we passionately believe that any such thing not merely can, but must, be built on a foundation of respect, empathy and care. This, anyway, is the effort to which we’ve devoted ourselves at Urbanscale. We hope you’ll join us."
cities  technology  urban  urbanscale  adamgreenfield  urbanism  networkedurbanism  smartcities  internet  empathy  accessibility  networkculture  connectivity  identity  discovery  discoverability  linux  design  opensource  data  publicobjects  open  cityasplatform 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Marco.org - Great since day one
"I never make technology-buying decisions based on future promises, rumors, or potential. I let other people be the bleeding-edge extremely early adopters, and I stick with what I know will work and stay out of my way. I don’t buy things that are “getting better”, because they usually don’t. Whatever caused them to be lacking in their current release will usually prevent them from being great in future releases.
android  apple  iphone  linux  marcoarment  business  refinement  polish  gettingbetter  greatsinedayone  bleedingedge 
july 2010 by robertogreco
F.lux: software to make your life better
"Ever notice how people texting at night have that eerie blue glow? Or wake up ready to write down the Next Great Idea, and get blinded by your computer screen? During the day, computer screens look good—they're designed to look like the sun. But, at 9PM, 10PM, or 3AM, you probably shouldn't be looking at the sun. F.lux fixes this: it makes the color of your computer's display adapt to the time of day, warm at night and like sunlight during the day. It's even possible that you're staying up too late because of your computer. You could use f.lux because it makes you sleep better, or you could just use it just because it makes your computer look better. f.lux makes your computer screen look like the room you're in, all the time. When the sun sets, it makes your computer look like your indoor lights. In the morning, it makes things look like sunlight again. Tell f.lux what kind of lighting you have, and where you live. Then forget about it. F.lux will do the rest, automatically."
freeware  lighting  health  sleep  macosx  osx  flux  light  utilities  software  windows  linux  environment  free  via:robinsloan  mac 
june 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - RSA Animate - Drive
"Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us... This lively RSA Animate, adapted from Dan Pink's talk at the RSA, illustrates the hidden truths behind what really motivates us at home and in the workplace."
rsa  autonomy  designthinking  drive  economics  engagement  motivation  psychology  danielpink  rewards  intrinsicmotivation  extrinsicmotivation  understanding  conceptualunderstanding  self-directedlearning  self-direction  hr  wikipedia  linux  problemsolving  criticalthinking  work  learning  unschooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  lcproject 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Gwibber in Launchpad
"Gwibber is an open source microblogging client for GNOME developed with Python and GTK. It supports Twitter, Identi.ca, StatusNet, Facebook, Flickr, Digg, FriendFeed, and Qaiku."
flickr  jaiku  linux  microblogging  twitter  socialnetworking  facebook  digg  blogging  python  opensource  ubuntu  identi.ca 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Next-gen Nokia Linux devices will get multitouch and Qt UI - Ars Technica
"At the Maemo Summit in Amsterdam, Nokia unveiled the roadmap for the next generation of its Linux-based Maemo platform. The company plans to introduce support for multitouch and a number of other compelling features."
maemo  nokia  linux 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Always Innovating: Introducing the Touch Book
"The world's first netbook with a detachable keyboard. More than 10 hours of battery life*. Touchscreen with 3D user interface. Internal USB slots."
hardware  computing  opensource  linux  touch  mobile  netbooks  laptops  technology  touchscreen 
august 2009 by robertogreco
LÖVE - Free 2D Game Engine
"LÖVE is an unquestionably awesome 2D game engine, which allows rapid game development and prototyping in Lua.
gameengine  gamedev  games  gaming  graphics  free  opensource  coding  linux  lua  programming  tcsnmy  mac  osx  windows  edg 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Sugar Activities
"Activities extend Sugar, letting you personalize your experience. Take a look around and make Sugar your own."
xo  olpc  sugar  sugarlabs  activities  education  technology  linux 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Password Gorilla
"The Password Gorilla helps you manage your logins. It stores all your user names and passwords, along with login information and other notes, in a securely encrypted file. A single "master password" is used to protect the file. This way, you only need to remember the single master password, instead of the many logins that you use."
via:preoccupations  passwords  security  windows  linux  applications  mac  osx  freeware  opensource  privacy  utilities  software 
may 2009 by robertogreco
FrontLine SMS on OLPC XO: Revolution You Can Run With - OLPC News
"By attaching a computer (Linux, Mac, or Windows) to a cell phone with a data cable and installing his (free, open source) software, Frontline SMS, that computer is turned into a messaging hub; sending and receiving text messages via the cell phone to hundreds of contacts."
olpc  xo  hacks  linux  applications  mac  osx  windows  sms  messaging  mobile  phones  server  data  opensource  texting 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Prey: Y rastrea tu computador robado | bootlog
"Prey es una pequeña y muy, muy simple aplicación que recolecta un lote información de tu computador, y la envía a una casilla de correo que hayas definido previamente. La idea es que la instales en tu laptop para que cuando llegue el día — ojalá nunca — en que desaparezca el tarro, cuentes con más información para rastrearlo, ya sea usando el IP, el nombre de la red WiFi a la que esté conectado, o bien la foto del impostor."
software  chile  opensource  mac  osx  security  linux  tracking  scripts 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Sugar Labs—learning software for children
"The award-winning Sugar Learning Platform promotes collaborative learning through Sugar Activities that encourage critical thinking, the heart of a quality education. Designed from the ground up especially for children, Sugar offers an alternative to traditional “office-desktop” software. Sugar is the core component of a worldwide effort to provide every child with equal opportunity for a quality education. Available in 25 languages, Sugar’s Activities are used every school day by almost one-million children in more than forty countries.
sugralabs  sugar  olpc  os  linux  opensource  education  learning  children  software  interface  gui 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Giving kids a fresh start with Qimo Linux | The Open Road - CNET News
"One of the great challenges to Linux adoption is inertia. Many Windows users, for example, have spent decades learning and using the operating system: they don't want to be bothered with moving to and learning another.
linux  ubuntu  children  opensource  qimo 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Sugar on a Stick - Sugar Labs
"The goal of the Sugar on a Stick project is to give children access to *their* Sugar on any computer in their environment with just a USB key.
sugar  xo  olpc  linux  education  portable  openclassroom  ubuntu 
february 2009 by robertogreco
OLPC Bookreader Demonstration — Open Library Blog
"Open Library recently launched a web demonstration designed to illustrate how Internet Archive book collections can be viewed on the OLPC XO Laptop.
olpc  ebooks  openaccess  books  software  readers  linux 
february 2009 by robertogreco
LÖVE - Free 2D Game Engine
"LÖVE is an unquestionably awesome 2D game engine, which allows rapid game development and prototyping in Lua. This project is constantly evolving and changes come and go, sometimes initiated by us and sometimes by the recommendations of others. If you have an idea on how to make the game engine better, it is greatly desired that you contact us and let us know what you think."
design  education  games  software  videogames  programming  edg  coding  osx  gaming  processing  windows  linux  graphics  opensource  mac  development  gamedev  2d  lua 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Jolicloud
"We love netbooks: they are cheap, compact, light and always connected via 3G.
netbooks  linux  ubuntu  cloudcomputing  hardware  eeepc  operatingsystem  jolicloud  computing  netvibes 
january 2009 by robertogreco
boxee: the open, connected, social media center for mac os x and linux
"on a laptop or connected to an HDTV, boxee gives you a true entertainment experience to enjoy your movies, TV shows, music and photos, as well as streaming content from websites like Hulu, Netflix, CBS, Comedy Central, Last.fm, and flickr." via: http://blog.wired.com/geekdad/2008/12/boxee-saves-the.html
mac  windows  linux  osx  opensource  appletv  video  tv  television  streaming  multimedia  freeware  onlinetoolkit  software  entertainment  media 
december 2008 by robertogreco
When Linux fails | Tux Deluxe
"Jon "Maddog" Hall's keynote talk at the Ontario Linux Fest also made this point in a very powerful way. Jon is a wonderfully entertaining speaker, and not afraid of controversy. Showing a picture of a child in the African bush holding a "One Laptop per Child" laptop he said "I don't care about this kid". The audience drew a shocked breath. "He's screwed," continued Jon. "Five hundred miles of bush behind him, five hundred miles of bush in front of him. There's nothing I can do to help here". Jon flipped the slide to show a Brazilian "favela", or slum city, with an incredibly dense population, seeming to cling to the side of a nearby hill. He said, "This is where I can help. These kids have electricity. They can get a network connection. I can do something with Open Source and Free Software here"."
olpc  opensource  africa  economics  politics  business  windows  software  Linux  favelas 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Why Microsoft and Intel tried to kill the XO $100 laptop - Times Online
"Nicholas Negroponte had a vision: to build a $100 laptop and give away millions to educate the world’s poorest children. And then the fat-cat multinationals got scared and broke it... "
olpc  microsoft  intel  capitalism  competition  negroponte  linux  laptops  education  technology  economics  business  opensource  mit 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Adeona: A Free, Open Source System for Helping Track and Recover Lost and Stolen Laptops
"the first Open Source system for tracking the location of your lost or stolen laptop that does not rely on a proprietary, central service. This means that you can install Adeona on your laptop and go — there's no need to rely on a single third party. W
security  opensource  tracking  software  mac  linux  windows  location  utilities  free  laptops 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Ubuntu Tutorials : Dapper - Feisty - Gutsy - Hardy
"How to do almost anything on your Ubuntu desktop, laptop or server. Regular tips on installing, configuring and making your Ubuntu system as effective as you need it to be."
ubuntu  linux  howto  tutorials  via:chrisod 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Ubuntu Linux Resources
collection of tutorials and random other pages that will help Ubuntu users
via:chrisod  ubuntu  linux  howto  reference  tutorials 
july 2008 by robertogreco
TheLastRipper - "The Danish law is very unclear on this subject and therefore this is our interpretation of the copyright law" ...
"TheLastRipper can save Last.fm streams to mp3's, while downloading album cover, appending ID3v2 tags and organizing you music after Artist/Album/Track. TheLastRipper will also help you generate playlists from the data available from you Last.fm account."
via:preoccupations  onlinetoolkit  last.fm  mp3  download  software  streaming  freeware  music  opensource  osx  mac  windows  linux  record  recording  playlists  radio  lastfm 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Why Brazil Loves Linux : Gustavo Duarte
"So that’s it. I think these are the main factors in Brazil’s love affair with Linux: economics, disregard for copyright, anti-Microsoft sentiment, and massive alpha geek support. These factors feed off each other, all pushing towards Linux. Millions
brasil  business  computing  culture  linux  microsoft  economics  copyright  opensource  brazil 
june 2008 by robertogreco
ParanoidLinux.org [making the OS from Cory Doctorow's Little Brother a reality]
"When those words were written, ParanoidLinux was just a fiction. It is our goal to make this a reality. The project officially started on May 14th, and has been growing ever since. We welcome your ideas, contributions, designs, or code. You can find us o
linux  privacy  security  opensource  littlebrother  paranoia  activism  corydoctorow  hacking  hacks  software  development  arg 
june 2008 by robertogreco
ivan krstić · code culture » Sic Transit Gloria Laptopi
"OLPC has a responsibility to spread the culture of freedom and ideas that support its educational mission; that cannot be done by only offering a proprietary operating system for the laptops."
olpc  opensource  linux  learning  hardware  economics  politics  software  sugar  philosophy  mac  osx  xo  microsoft  windows  culture  technology  business  education  development 
may 2008 by robertogreco
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