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ZotFile - Advanced PDF management for Zotero
"Zotfile is a Zotero plugin to manage your attachments: automatically rename, move, and attach PDFs (or other files) to Zotero items, sync PDFs from your Zotero library to your (mobile) PDF reader (e.g. an iPad, Android tablet, etc.) and extract annotations from PDF files."
tools  pdf  onlinetoolkit  dropbox  zotero  annotation  android  ipad  ios  srg 
july 2019 by robertogreco
The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected | WIRED
"THE FUTURE BOOK was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.

Prognostications about how technology would affect the form of paper books have been with us for centuries. Each new medium was poised to deform or murder the book: newspapers, photography, radio, movies, television, videogames, the internet.

Some viewed the intersection of books and technology more positively: In 1945, Vannevar Bush wrote in The Atlantic: “Wholly new forms of encyclopedias will appear, ready made with a mesh of associative trails running through them, ready to be dropped into the memex and there amplified.”

Researcher Alan Kay created a cardboard prototype of a tablet-like device in 1968. He called it the "Dynabook," saying, “We created a new kind of medium for boosting human thought, for amplifying human intellectual endeavor. We thought it could be as significant as Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press 500 years ago.”

In the 1990s, Future Bookism hit a kind of beautiful fever pitch. We were so close. Brown University professor Robert Coover, in a 1992 New York Times op-ed titled “The End of Books,” wrote of the future of writing: “Fluidity, contingency, indeterminacy, plurality, discontinuity are the hypertext buzzwords of the day, and they seem to be fast becoming principles, in the same way that relativity not so long ago displaced the falling apple.” And then, more broadly: “The print medium is a doomed and outdated technology, a mere curiosity of bygone days destined soon to be consigned forever to those dusty unattended museums we now call libraries.”

Normal books? Bo-ring. Future Books? Awesome—indeterminate—and we were almost there! The Voyager Company built its "expanded books" platform on Hypercard, launching with three titles at MacWorld 1992. Microsoft launched Encarta on CD-ROM.

But … by the mid-2000s, there still were no real digital books. The Rocket eBook was too little, too early. Sony launched the eink-based Librie platform in 2004 to little uptake. Interactive CD-ROMs had dropped off the map. We had Wikipedia, blogs, and the internet, but the mythological Future Book—some electric slab that would somehow both be like and not like the quartos of yore—had yet to materialize. Peter Meirs, head of technology at Time, hedged his bets perfectly, proclaiming: “Ultimately, there will be some sort of device!”

And then there was. Several devices, actually. The iPhone launched in June 2007, the Kindle that November. Then, in 2010, the iPad arrived. High-resolution screens were suddenly in everyone’s hands and bags. And for a brief moment during the early 2010s, it seemed like it might finally be here: the glorious Future Book."



"Yet here’s the surprise: We were looking for the Future Book in the wrong place. It’s not the form, necessarily, that needed to evolve—I think we can agree that, in an age of infinite distraction, one of the strongest assets of a “book” as a book is its singular, sustained, distraction-free, blissfully immutable voice. Instead, technology changed everything that enables a book, fomenting a quiet revolution. Funding, printing, fulfillment, community-building—everything leading up to and supporting a book has shifted meaningfully, even if the containers haven’t. Perhaps the form and interactivity of what we consider a “standard book” will change in the future, as screens become as cheap and durable as paper. But the books made today, held in our hands, digital or print, are Future Books, unfuturistic and inert may they seem."

[sections on self-publishing, crowdfunding, email newsletters, social media, audiobooks and podcasts, etc.]



"It turns out smartphones aren’t the best digital book reading devices (too many seductions, real-time travesties, notifications just behind the words), but they make excellent audiobook players, stowed away in pockets while commuting. Top-tier podcasts like Serial, S-Town, and Homecoming have normalized listening to audio or (nonfiction) booklike productions on smartphones."



"Last August, a box arrived on my doorstep that seemed to embody the apotheosis of contemporary publishing. The Voyager Golden Record: 40th Anniversary Edition was published via a crowdfunding campaign. The edition includes a book of images, three records, and a small poster packaged in an exquisite box set with supplementary online material. When I held it, I didn’t think about how futuristic it felt, nor did I lament the lack of digital paper or interactivity. I thought: What a strange miracle to be able to publish an object like this today. Something independently produced, complex and beautiful, with foil stamping and thick pages, full-color, in multiple volumes, made into a box set, with an accompanying record and other shimmering artifacts, for a weirdly niche audience, funded by geeks like me who are turned on by the romance of space.

We have arrived to the once imagined Future Book in piecemeal truths.

Moving images were often espoused to be a core part of our Future Book. While rarely found inside of an iBooks or Kindle book, they are here. If you want to learn the ukulele, you don’t search Amazon for a Kindle how-to book, you go to YouTube and binge on hours of lessons, stopping when you need to, rewinding as necessary, learning at your own pace.

Vannevar Bush's “Memex” essentially described Wikipedia built into a desk.

The "Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy" in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is an iPhone.

In The Book of Sand, Borges wrote of an infinite book: "It was then that the stranger told me: 'Study the page well. You will never see it again.'" Describing in many ways what it feels like to browse the internet or peek at Twitter.

Our Future Book is composed of email, tweets, YouTube videos, mailing lists, crowdfunding campaigns, PDF to .mobi converters, Amazon warehouses, and a surge of hyper-affordable offset printers in places like Hong Kong.

For a “book” is just the endpoint of a latticework of complex infrastructure, made increasingly accessible. Even if the endpoint stays stubbornly the same—either as an unchanging Kindle edition or simple paperback—the universe that produces, breathes life into, and supports books is changing in positive, inclusive ways, year by year. The Future Book is here and continues to evolve. You’re holding it. It’s exciting. It’s boring. It’s more important than it has ever been.

But temper some of those flight-of-fancy expectations. In many ways, it’s still a potato."
craigmod  ebooks  reading  howweread  2018  kindle  eink  print  publishing  selfpublishing  blurb  lulu  amazon  ibooks  apple  digital  bookfuturism  hypertext  hypercard  history  vannevarbush  borges  twitter  animation  video  newsletters  email  pdf  mobi  epub  infrastructure  systems  economics  goldenrecord  voyager  audio  audiobooks  smarthphones  connectivity  ereaders  podcasts  socialmedia  kevinkelly  benthompson  robinsloan  mailchimp  timbuktulabs  elenafavilli  francescacavallo  jackcheng  funding  kickstarter  crowdfunding  blogs  blogging  wikipedia  internet  web  online  writing  howwewrite  self-publishing  youtube 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Bindery.js · Introduction
"Bindery.js is a library for designing printable books with HTML and CSS.

At its simplest, Bindery flows content over multiple pages. From there, the designer can create running headers, spreads, footnotes, tables of contents, indexes, and more. Bindery also provides print options like bleed, crop marks, and booklet ordering.

Web designers can think about books as an extension of responsive design, and print designers can express layouts programmatically, without the need for InDesign."

[via: "Print Are.na with Bindery.js"
https://are.na/clement-valla/print-are-na-with-bindery-js

"Make books from Are.na Channels with Bindery.js. You can format the books using CSS!

It currently works pretty well, but we'd be happy to get some help cleaning up the css a little."]
html  css  publishing  re.na  pdf  bindery.js  papernet  print 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Google Docs have quietly revolutionized document editing.
"But Google’s update is far more than just a ploy to lure Office users away from Microsoft’s apps. Google is eliminating the need for distinct file types, making it easier to sign or edit documents regardless of the applications you have downloaded on your phone or desktop. It’s a novel idea, really—just being able to open a file, work on it, and not think about “what” it is. While Microsoft, Apple, and others continue to work in walled gardens, Google is making interoperability one of its primary focuses. For consumers inundated with ever more work but no additional hours in the day, it’s the kind of time and stress savings that are exceedingly worthwhile."
google  googledocs  googledrive  files  2018  christinabonnington  fileformats  filetypes  interoperability  pdf 
february 2018 by robertogreco
The Color Gradient Reader BeeLine Shows Promise for Speed and Attention in Reading - The Atlantic
"In the era of attention deficits, the new text will not be black and white."



"The colors in this text are rendered in a precise and strategic way, designed to help people read quickly and accurately.

The most important feature is that each line begins with a different color than the line above or below. As Matthew Schneps, director of the Laboratory for Visual Learning at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, explained it to me, the color gradients also pull our eyes long from one character to the next—and then from the end of one line to the beginning of the next, minimizing any chance of skipping lines or making anything less than an optimally efficient word-to-word or line-to-line transition.

Improving the ease and accuracy of the return sweep is a promising idea for readers of all skill levels. And yet it’s one that’s gone largely ignored in the milieu of media technologies. Today many of us read primarily on screens–and we have for years–yet most platforms have focused on using technology to attempt to recreate text as it appears in books (or in newspapers or magazines), instead of trying to create an optimal reading experience.

The format—black text on white lines of 12 to 15 words of equal size—is a relic of the way that books were most easily printed on early printing presses. It persists today out of tradition, not because of some innate tendency of the human brain to process information in this way.

Meanwhile, people who aren’t especially skilled at intake of text in the traditional format are systematically penalized. People who don’t read well in this one particular way tend to fall behind scholastically early in life. They might be told they’re not as bright as other people, or at least come to assume it. They might even be diagnosed with ADHD, dyslexia, or a learning disability, or overlooked as academically mediocre.

“The book format was effective, but not for everyone,” said Schneps. “This is not just technology that could help people who are struggling with reading; this is technology that could help a lot of people.”

* * *

Our minds are not as uniform as our text. We all take in information in different ways. Some people read more quickly and retain more information when lines are shorter, or when fonts are bolder, or in different colors. The color-gradient pattern above is rendered by a product called BeeLine, developed by armchair linguist Nick Lum. He got the idea after learning about the Stroop Effect, the famous phenomenon where it becomes difficult to read words like “yellow” and “red” when they are written in different colors. Lum thought, “What if instead of screwing people up, we tried to use color in a way that helps people?”

After he won the Stanford Social Entrepreneurship and Dell Education startup competitions with the idea in 2014, Lum took to developing the technology full time. So far, the response from people tends to be binary: for some it’s a shrug, but for others, particularly people with dyslexias, it’s like turning on a light bulb. As Lum describes it, people tell him “Holy cow, this is how everybody else reads.”

The idea has been well received by reading experts, too.

“Most of the academic research is figuring out entirely what your eyes are going to do on one line,” said psychologist and Microsoft researcher Kevin Larson. “That has been such a challenge that it's rare for anyone to pay much attention to what happens during that line return movement.”

At the University of Texas at Austin, Randolph Bias has studied the optimal length of lines of text for reading comprehension and speed. The two are generally at odds: Short lines make for a quick and accurate return (the movement is easier because it allows our eyes to take a greater downward angle than if the line were longer.) The downside is that because our brains process information during return sweeps, shorter lines don't afford us that time. We also don’t get to take full advantage of peripheral vision – which is key. (He cites this as the problem with Spritz, the reading technology where single words rapidly flash before a reader.)"



"The other big opportunity for the technology is in educational settings. Later this year, BeeLine will be rolling out in libraries across California, as part of a licensing partnership. This is how Lum sees the company growing. The basic Google Chrome extension and iPhone app are free. But large-scale licensing deals with platforms and institutions like school systems could be more lucrative—and make the option accessible to people who wouldn’t otherwise think to try reading in color.

In early experiments, some students do seem to benefit from the color gradients. Last year, first-grade students in two general-education classrooms in San Bernardino, California, tried out Beeline, and many did better with comprehension tests afterword. “Because of my background in visual processing, I immediately wanted to check it out,” said Michael Dominguez, an applied behavioral analyst who directs the San Bernardino school district’s special education program. “Based on everything I know, it should work great.”"

[See also (referenced in the article):
http://www.beelinereader.com/
https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/ie/2014/03/04/introducing-reading-view-in-ie-11/ ]
howweread  reading  dyslexia  education  cyborgs  adhd  color  text  jameshamblin  kevinlarson  via:ayjay  michaeldominguez  beeline  chrome  browser  browsers  extensions  accessibility  assistivetechnology  microsoft  attention  technology  edtech  nicklum  linguistics  randolphbias  spritz  ereading  kindle  pdfs  epub  pdf 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Annotating PDFs Without URLs – Hypothesis
"For sometime now, you’ve been able to annotate PDFs using Hypothes.is, both on the web and locally, with hosted PDFs syncing with local instances and various local instances syncing with each other. Jon Udell wrote about this magical feature here over a year go.

[video]

For those that tried it out, however, there was one annoying snag, especially if you were trying to lead a large group (of students, say) through the process: users had to create an annotation on a local PDF before they would be able to view any pre-existing annotations created elsewhere–in other local instances or where originally hosted. (The same would happen for identical PDFs hosted at two distinct URLs.)

So it was possible to be sent a PDF that had supposedly been annotated, open it, activate Hypothes.is and not see any annotations. Even if you knew about the need to create an annotation to view annotations, you were entering that conversation blindly or else creating a dummy annotation to be deleted later. This added step admittedly took away some of the “mind-blowingness” of annotating PDFs across multiple locations using Hypothes.is.

Now that step is no longer necessary.

What’s changed?

We used to use the URL as the primary identifier of PDFs. That’s what the Hypothes.is client would search for in the database to anchor annotations on a page. Now we use the digital fingerprint that is baked into PDFs from their generation as part of the spec for the format. We did use this fingerprint previously as a secondary identifier to map local PDFs to hosted ones or PDFs hosted at different URLs to each other, which is what caused the lag between new annotation creation and appearance of pre-existing annotations. This shift from URL to PDF fingerprint will truly enhance the portability of annotations on the format across the web.

For example, if the same scholarly journal article is housed at two different repositories, annotations created at either location will show up at the other (assuming both PDFs have the same fingerprint, an assumption that is not always the case). Public annotations created on a local version of the same PDF will also be immediately viewable. If I annotate an essay at a permanent URL on JSTOR, then download the article and share it via email, or host it on my own WordPress site, my annotations will anchor through all incarnations of that PDF."
via:tealtan  hypothes.is  pdfs  annotation  howto  tutorials  pdf 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Binder
"About
Binder is a simple web template.
It allows users to connect a series of already-existing web pages into one home-base with a customizable navigation. Binder is built using Javascript and JQuery, and uses iFrames.

Get Binder:
Binder is on github here. [https://github.com/clementvalla/binder/ ]
Binder can be downloaded as a .zip here.

Binder can be used with:
• Google Docs
• Tumblr
• NewHive
• PDF’s
• Wikipedia
• Youtube (using embed link)
• Vimeo (using embed link)
• and more

Binder can’t be used with:
• Twitter
• Facebook
• Sites that don’t allow iframes

Questions
Please direct any questions about Binder to: info@thisisourwork.net

Credits
This is our work with Clement Valla"

[Used for: http://printedweb.org/ ]
binder  clementvalla  webdev  googledocs  via:soulellis  pdfs  tumblr  wikipedia  youtube  vimeo  newhive  github  webdesign  pdf 
september 2015 by robertogreco
PDF Scissors
"In short, It's a tool to crop pdfs.
Objective to create this, was to read pdf files (specially the scanned ones) easily in ebook readers, like kindle. 
And by the way, it's a free tool!"
pdfs  onlinetoolkit  ebooks  pdf 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Upload - PDFy - Instant PDF Host
"Why does PDFy exist? I got sick of documents getting locked up behind login walls of services like Scribd. PDFy exists to offer a place where anybody can instantly upload and share a PDF, much like Imgur does for images. PDFy is free, ad-free, and non-commercial.

Servers aren't free, though. Your donations are much appreciated. You can donate by clicking here, using PayPal, Bitcoin, or Flattr.

Click to upload ... or drag and drop a PDF file here, to upload it (max. 100 MB).
What you get:

• Your PDF hosted permanently, ad-free.
• Share-able page with PDF viewer (using pdf.js).
• Embeddable version of the viewer.
• Original PDF can be downloaded by anybody, without registration.
• All public PDFs mirrored to the Internet Archive for preservation.

Please don't upload warez! Terms of Service here."

[See also: https://github.com/joepie91/pdfy ]
pdf  pdfs  pdfy  hosting  ebooks  documents  onlinetoolkit  via:caseygollan  scribd  imgur 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Sente 6 for Mac: Academic Reference Manager
"Academic Reference Management for Mac and iPad. Free for small libraries. Essential for all libraries.

Sente 6 will change the way you think about academic reference management. It will change the way you collect your reference material, the way you organize your library, the way you read papers and take notes, and the way you write up your own research. If you do academic research, you need Sente 6.

It is easy to get started with Sente. Both the Mac and iPad apps are free and they provide you with a basic account on our servers. Upgrade to a premium account for unlimited libraries and more sync space.

Your Research Hub
Sente is the most powerful and flexible academic reference manager available. Sente makes it easier then ever to acquire, organize, read, annotate and cite academic research material. And Sente runs on all your Macs and iPads, with cloud-based sync, so your research library is always up-to-date on all your devices.

Sente's beautiful user interface makes it a pleasure to use. When you look at Sente, you see your research and your ideas, not our software. Single collection tabs let you focus on one group of references at a time, like all those references with the To Be Read status. Single reference tabs let you focus on the one reference you are currently reading. And full screen mode maximizes the use of every bit of your screen real estate while eliminating distractions.

Gather
Sente makes building your research library easier than ever. Targeted browsing lets you add references from many web sites such as EBSCOHost, JSTOR, and PubMed with just a click, without leaving Sente. Another click downloads the PDF and adds it to your library.

Bulk searches can automatically retrieve hundreds or thousands of references from many sources such as PubMed, Web of Knowledge, and hundreds of university and research libraries. Best of all, they remain active in the background, alerting you daily to new references in your fast-moving field.

Get started by importing libraries directly from EndNote, Bookends, Papers, Mendeley, Zotero, and Reference Manager.

Organize
Sente has the tools you need to stay organized, even as your library grows to thousands of references or more. Hierarchical QuickTags give you unprecedented power for cataloging your references.

Built-in smart collections give you quick access to your library. Custom smart collections let you create just the subsets you need. Custom statuses make it easy to make Sente fit your personal research workflow.

Batch editing makes it easy to edit any combination of fields in dozens or hundreds of references at once.

Customize
Sente lets you customize your library to meet your specific needs. Custom statuses help you keep track of your references through each step of your research workflow. Custom reference types let you handle whatever kind of references you might need. Custom attributes let you add any special fields you might need to any reference type. And you can configure the reference editor to present your data just the way you want to see it.

Cloud Sync
Sente lets you create synchronized copies of your libraries and place them on any number of Macs and iPads, anywhere in the world, and all copies will stay in sync automatically.

Once you turn it on, it just works—continuously and behind the scenes—and everything syncs: references, PDFs (including highlighting), notes, even customizations.

Create full-access copies for your own computers and restricted copies for sharing with students or colleagues. Even if you don't need to sync multiple devices, it's a great backup strategy too.

Read, Annotate, Take Notes
Highlight passages in your PDFs and capture quotations and your own thoughts in notes, using Sente's powerful annotation tools. Create any number of notes for each reference and easily jump from any note back to its linked place in the text. Best of all, your notes and highlighting are immediately synced through the cloud across all copies of your library.

Bibliographies
Of course, in the end, you need to write up your own work. Sente supports all the popular Mac word processors, including Pages, Word, Mellel, Scrivener, Nisus Writer, Open Office, and other applications that support Rich Text Format. More than 100 bibliography formats are included and you can create your own or tweak existing formats to meet your needs. Citations can even appear in footnotes, if your style requires that.

If you collaborate with people who write with Microsoft Word and EndNote, on a Mac or Windows, you will be able to exchange drafts with them seamlessly because Sente reads and writes docx files that are compatible with EndNote.

Free Sente Account
You can download and use both the Mac and the iPad versions of Sente for free. This will give you a free Sente account that can be used to create any number of reference libraries, each with up to 100 references. And you can sync up to 250MB of attachments with a free account. For many users, the free account is all they will ever need.

Unlimited Libraries, Unlimited Sync*
People who need to create larger libraries can upgrade to a premium Sente account for just $59.99 if you are a student, faculty or staff at an accredited academic institution (or just $79.99 without an academic affiliation). With a premium account, you can use both the Mac and the iPad apps to create libraries of any size. And a premium account provides you with unlimited sync space."
via:timmaly  pdf  software  mac  osx  ios 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Tabula
"If you’ve ever tried to do anything with data provided to you in PDFs, you know how painful this is — you can’t easily copy-and-paste rows of data out of PDF files. Tabula allows you to extract that data in CSV format, through a simple interface. And now you can download Tabula and run it on your own computer, like you would with OpenRefine."
tables  pdf  tools  data  extraction 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Penflip - collaborative writing and version control
"Write: Focus on writing with our minimalist markdown editor, or work offline with your favorite text editor.

Collaborate: Send a link to gather feedback - no downloads. Easy version control and revision history built right in.

Publish: Download your beautifully formatted ebook with just one click. Compile to PDF, ePub, HTML and more."
collaboration  writing  online.toolkit  markdown  git  epub  pdf  html  collaborativewriting  epubs 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Frankenfont | Fathom
"An edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein laid out using characters and glyphs from PDF documents obtained through internet searches. The incomplete fonts found in the PDFs were reassembled into the text of Frankenstein based on their frequency of use. The most common characters are employed at the beginning of the book, and the text devolves into less common, more grotesque shapes and forms toward the end.

The beginning of the book is comprised largely of Arial, Helvetica, and the occasional Times New Roman. As you might expect, these are by far the most common fonts used in documents.

By page 46 and 47, things have progressed to a lot of Arial Bold and Times Italic.

In the 200s, commonly used script fonts, as well as much more obscure faces are beginning to appear.

As we reach the end, the book has devolved significantly: non-Roman fonts, highly specialized typefaces, and even pictogram fonts abound.

Process. For each of the 5,483 unique words in the book, we ran a search (using the Yahoo! Search API) that was filtered to just PDF files. We downloaded the top 10 to 15 hits for each word, producing 64,076 PDF files (some were no longer available, others were duplicates). Inside these PDFs were 347,565 subsetted fonts.From those fonts, 55,382 unique glyph shapes were used to fill the 342,889 individual letters found in the Frankenstein text.

PDF Fonts. This project started because of a fascination with the way that PDF files contain incomplete versions of fonts. The shape data is high enough quality to reproduce the original document, however only the necessary characters (and little of the font’s “metrics” that are used for proper typographic layout) are included in the PDF. This prevents others from extracting the fonts to be used for practical purposes, but creates an opportunity for a curious Victor Frankenstein who wants to use these incomplete pieces to create something entirely different."
books  ebooks  fonts  frankenstein  pdf  glyphs  characters  internet  search  maryshelly  frankenfont  srg  benfry  2011  papernet 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Pandoc - About pandoc
"If you need to convert files from one markup format into another, pandoc is your swiss-army knife. Pandoc can convert documents in markdown, reStructuredText, textile, HTML, DocBook, LaTeX, MediaWiki markup, OPML, or Haddock markup to

• HTML formats: XHTML, HTML5, and HTML slide shows using Slidy, reveal.js, Slideous, S5, or DZSlides.
• Word processor formats: Microsoft Word docx, OpenOffice/LibreOffice ODT, OpenDocument XML
• Ebooks: EPUB version 2 or 3, FictionBook2
• Documentation formats: DocBook, GNU TexInfo, Groff man pages, Haddock markup
• Outline formats: OPML
• TeX formats: LaTeX, ConTeXt, LaTeX Beamer slides
• PDF via LaTeX
• Lightweight markup formats: Markdown, reStructuredText, AsciiDoc, MediaWiki markup, Emacs Org-Mode, Textile
• Custom formats: custom writers can be written in lua.

Pandoc understands a number of useful markdown syntax extensions, including document metadata (title, author, date); footnotes; tables; definition lists; superscript and subscript; strikeout; enhanced ordered lists (start number and numbering style are significant); running example lists; delimited code blocks with syntax highlighting; smart quotes, dashes, and ellipses; markdown inside HTML blocks; and inline LaTeX. If strict markdown compatibility is desired, all of these extensions can be turned off."

[via: http://text-patterns.thenewatlantis.com/2013/10/writing-big.html ]
conversion  markdown  markup  pdf  latex  html  xhtml  software  mac  osx  windows  linux 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Pandoc - About pandoc
"If you need to convert files from one markup format into another, pandoc is your swiss-army knife. Pandoc can convert documents in markdown, reStructuredText, textile, HTML, DocBook, LaTeX, or MediaWiki markup to

• HTML formats: XHTML, HTML5, and HTML slide shows using Slidy, Slideous, S5, or DZSlides.
• Word processor formats: Microsoft Word docx, OpenOffice/LibreOffice ODT, OpenDocument XML
• Ebooks: EPUB version 2 or 3, FictionBook2
• Documentation formats: DocBook, GNU TexInfo, Groff man pages
• TeX formats: LaTeX, ConTeXt, LaTeX Beamer slides
• PDF via LaTeX
• Lightweight markup formats: Markdown, reStructuredText, AsciiDoc, MediaWiki markup, Emacs Org-Mode, Textile

Pandoc understands a number of useful markdown syntax extensions, including document metadata (title, author, date); footnotes; tables; definition lists; superscript and subscript; strikeout; enhanced ordered lists (start number and numbering style are significant); running example lists; delimited code blocks with syntax highlighting; smart quotes, dashes, and ellipses; markdown inside HTML blocks; and inline LaTeX. If strict markdown compatibility is desired, all of these extensions can be turned off."
pandoc  conversion  html  epub  latex  pdf  html5  onlinetoolkit  ebooks  documents  markdown  text  tools  epublishing  digitalpublishing  epubs 
august 2013 by robertogreco
iPad App for Editing, Note Taking & Annotating PDFs| iAnnotate by Branchfire
"iAnnotate turns your tablet into a world-class productivity tool for reading, marking up, and sharing PDF documents, Word/PowerPoint files, and images. Every day thousands of students and professionals discover how it helps them work better. Join the more than half million users that already rely on iAnnotate to get work done."

[via: http://lifehacker.com/im-clive-thompson-and-this-is-how-i-work-479520206 ]
ipad  annotation  applications  ios  pdf  notetaking 
april 2013 by robertogreco
How to Make a Book with PressBooks | PressBooks
"How to Make a Book with PressBooks

PressBooks is a simple book publishing tool. Put your book content into PressBooks, edit as you like, and export into ebook and PDF/print-on-demand formats. Here’s how it works:

Short 4-Step Guide to Making a Book with PressBooks

1. Add Book Information (title, author name etc).
2. Add/Organize Text (your chapters etc)
3. Choose Book Design Theme (what your book will look like)
4. Export your book (in MOBI {for Kindle}, EPUB {for Nook/iBooks etc), PDF {for print-on-demand}"
ebooks  publishing  tools  howto  pressbooks  epub  epubs  mobi  pdf  kindle  nook  epublishing  digitalpublishing 
february 2013 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Sketchbook: Print-on-demand work-in-progress
"The fact that things could be emailed, which is a prerequisite, also meant they were too easy to ignore. By making something easy to disseminate via email, you were also placing it in a fast-flowing stream of other objects… 

We wanted to exploit the fertile middle ground of “work in progress” with something that was a little more engaging, that would pull focus onto the discussions at hand, yet not so over-produced that the thing couldn’t iterate or evolve. Something that could be thrown around in a workshop—literally!—accessed in linear or non-linear fashion, carry visual and textual information, carried on the person, or remain guiltily within sight on someone’s desk. Something physical and digital' which might have an allure over simply digital, at least at the form of artifacts.

In other words, a small book. So a simple InDesign template later, and a not-quite-so-simple PDF upload a little later, a bunch of A5 books emerged via Lulu’s print-on-demand (POD) service."

[See also: http://www.helsinkidesignlab.org/blog/helsinki-street-eats-and-hacking-lulu ]
workinprogress  communication  email  oma  documentation  process  craigmod  printondemand  low2no  amazon  layout  jamesgoggiin  magcloud  dearlulu  helsinkidesignlab  sitra  newspaperclub  blurb  lulu  projectideas  glvo  books  indesign  pdf  printing  2012  selfpublishing  self-publishing  cityofsound  danhill  unbook 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Booktype
"With Booktype you can create books. Real paper books that look good…You can also use Booktype to produce books in the form of epub (electronic books), PDF, OpenOffice files, web pages and more...

Booktype is a web based software which means you do not install it on your computer, rather you access it through a browser. Your organisation can install its own copy of Booktype on a server. Access is then made through a url provided by your organisation.

Once installed Booktype supports any individual or group that wishes to write a book. All you need is a browser. Some typical uses:
Writing books - e.g. a fiction, manuals, cookbooks etc.
Producing printed books
Producing ebooks
Writing any content as an individual
Collaboratively authoring content
Rapidly developing content in Book Sprints
Customising existing content to apply to a very specific context
Translating a book into another language"

[See also: http://www.booki.cc/ ]

[via: http://www.booki.cc/the-importance-of-the-way-stories-are-being-told/introduction/ ]
opensource  free  collaborativewriting  online  open  openoffice  pdf  epublishing  epub  booktype  tools  writing  collaboration  books  ebooks  digitalpublishing  epubs 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Frankenfont | Fathom
"An edition of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein laid out using characters and glyphs from PDF documents obtained through internet searches. The incomplete fonts found in the PDFs were reassembled into the text of Frankenstein based on their frequency of use. The most common characters are employed at the beginning of the book, and the text devolves into less common, more grotesque shapes and forms toward the end."

"Process. For each of the 5,483 unique words in the book, we ran a search (using the Yahoo! Search API) that was filtered to just PDF files. We downloaded the top 10 to 15 hits for each word, producing 64,076 PDF files (some were no longer available, others were duplicates). Inside these PDFs were 347,565 subsetted fonts.

From those fonts, 55,382 unique glyph shapes were used to fill the 342,889 individual letters found in the Frankenstein text."
timesnewroman  helvetica  arial  books  frankenfont  typography  visualization  fonts  pdf  frankenstein 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Book creator - Wikipedia
"With the book creator you can create a book containing wiki pages of your choice. You can export the book in different formats (for example PDF or ODF) or order a printed copy."
via:preoccupations  wikipedia  papernet  books  pdf 
march 2011 by robertogreco
A Machine Project Field Guide to LACMA | Machine Shop | machine project
"We’ve been hard at work on a catalog for the show we did at LACMA last year, and it’s finally done! With full-color spreads devoted to the more than 60 projects presented that day, it’s like having an entire year’s worth of delightful Machine Project activities stuffed into a weighty, yet compact and attractive book. Guaranteed +3 on your charisma score!

And for those of you who hate books, now’s your chance to hasten their demise. Download the entire book as a free PDF! (If you feel guilty about how awesome this is, you can go ahead and give us money.)

A Machine Project Field Guide to LACMA was designed by the talented Kimberly Varella and the Department of Graphic Sciences."

[A bit redundant as I've already bookmarked this http://machineproject.com/lacma/ , but this project needs more notice.]
lacma  machineproject  pdf  books  kimberlyvarella  art  losangeles  classideas 
september 2010 by robertogreco
a m l - want to look ahead? look around instead.
"when new high-tech & high-priced gizmos like kindle & its much hipper cousin ipad came out, the blogosphere was very excited. nevermind that hacker websites from russia to south america have been scanning & posting pdfs for consumption of rest of the world that does not have a library around the corner nor easy access to jstor et al. the ipad is not the revolution, digital text is. it is less important how you read it, than the possibility of being able to read it at all! ingenuity finds uses for technology other than those originally intended, & this often happens because of need. think of cell phones used as micro loan mechanisms in india. think of the development of the bus rapid transit system in curitiba, transforming the bus into a dedicated line system resulting in an affordable mass transportation system that has been replicated in several cities in south america. christopher hawtorne thinks we should look at medellin… he is, of course, a bit late, but hey, we’ll take it."
thestreetwillfindause  medellin  colombia  india  streetuse  technology  ipad  kindle  libraries  text  digitaltext  anamaríaleón  cities  suburbia  travel  jetset  sustainability  green  latinamerica  southamerica  jaimelerner  pdf  learning  information  hacks  hacking  microloans  rapidtransit  christopherhawthorne  architecture  urban  urbanism  planning  future  decline  invention  thefutureishere  medellín 
may 2010 by robertogreco
goodiware.com :: products
"Congratulations! You've found the one and only Good Reader app for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad! If you need to read huge PDF, or TXT files, you've come to the right place. Faithful users of GoodReader have reported flawless performance with files over 1 gig in size; but that's only one of the many features that makes GoodReader the best app of its kind.
googreader  iphone  ipad  applications  pdf  text  reading  via:ddmeyer  ios 
april 2010 by robertogreco
ONull - Vector Generator
"ONull is an image based Vector Generator for Mac OSX. It allows the user to convert images into rasterized vector graphics. This tool was developed to give graphic designers the ability to transform small images from the Internet into printable and editable graphics. ONull is written in Java and uses the Processing core library as graphical engine."
onull  raster  vectors  visualization  macosx  osx  mac  converter  design  freeware  generator  processing  java  via:migurski  images  illustrator  graphics  software  pdf  photography 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Panic Blog » ShrinkIt 1.1
"ShrinkIt is a simple, small, Panic-internal tool (for Mac OS X Snow Leopard) that will automate the process of stripping needless metadata from PDFs by re-saving them using Apple’s PDF processor. For app resources and icons that aren’t using high-end Illustrator features, this should be lossless — Apple’s PDF code is not compressing anything, just removing cruft. Simply drop a bunch of files (not folders) onto it — such as the contents of your app’s Resources folder — to have it find the PDFs and do its magic. The original files will be renamed with the prefix “_org_” for backup safety. That’s it!"
shrinkit  adobe  mac  osx  optimization  utilities  pdf  freeware  panic  software  applications  macosx  compression  free 
february 2010 by robertogreco
100+ Places for Free Books Online
"This is a listing of 135 sites that legally offer free books (eBooks) for download or for online viewing."
books  free  ebooks  pdf  literature  edg  srg  downloads  audiobooks  tcsnmy  onlinebooks 
september 2009 by robertogreco
zinepal.com
"Use zinepal.com to create your own magazines or zines for short. Select content from your favorite blogs, websites or RSS feeds and put it in your zine. zinepal.com creates an online version and a printable PDF. Then you print it and read it in your favorite coffee shop, e-mail it to your friends or just let them subscribe to your online zine feed."
zines  unbook  via:russelldavies  print  pdf  publishing  magazines  papernet 
march 2009 by robertogreco
The Future of Search Is Already Here « OUseful.Info, the blog…
"SnapTell: a mobile and iPhone app that lets you photograph a book, CD or game cover and it’ll recognise it, tell you what it is and take you to the appropriate Amazon page so you can buy it…Shazam, a music recognition application that will identify a piece of music that’s playing out loud, pop up some details, and then let you buy it on iTunes or view a version of the song being played on Youtube...pload a scanned document onto the web as a PDF document, Google will now have a go at running an OCR service over the document, extracting the text, indexing it and making it searchable...Youtube added the ability to augment videos with captions"
search  iphone  youtube  amazon  google  ocr  pdf  music  sound  applications  ios 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Featured Firefox Extension: Quartz PDF Displays Inline PDFs in Firefox 3
"Firefox extension Quartz PDF enables inline viewing of PDFs in Firefox 3 for the Mac. Just install, and next time you follow a link to a PDF, it quickly loads the PDF directly inline."
firefox  mac  osx  extensions  addons  pdf  browser  browsers 
june 2008 by robertogreco
MagCloud
"MagCloud enables you to publish your own magazines. All you have to do is upload a PDF and we'll take care of the rest: printing, mailing, subscription management, and more."

[more info: http://powazek.com/posts/984 ]
magazines  publishing  diy  make  printing  pdf  catalog  selfpublishing  onlinetoolkit  zines  via:preoccupations  classideas  self-publishing 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Cornell Notetaking Method Custom PDF Generator
"create custom notetaking sheets for any or all of your classes. The custom sheets can be blank (Cornell Style), ruled, or graph style. They are output with your name, the name of your class, and the date - that is, if you provide that information."
onlinetoolkit  pdf  generator  notetaking  productivity  notes  tools  gtd  studentsupplylist  classideas 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Motion Mountain - The Adventure of Physics : The Free Physics Textbook
"Written in English, over 1500 pages are provided for students, teachers, and for anybody who is curious about the precise description of nature. To satisfy even the most extreme curiosity, the text ends by exploring the limits of time and space, and the
physics  science  free  books  education  reference  nature  elearning  pdf  e-learning  ebooks  textbooks 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Cool Tool: Motion Mountain
"It's what a physics textbook would be like if a poet wrote it and made no mistakes. The book is massively visual. There is minimal math. It's a textbook with soul."
physics  science  education  free  books  PDF  learning  ebooks 
february 2008 by robertogreco
S5: A Simple Standards-Based Slide Show System
"S5 is a slide show format based entirely on XHTML, CSS, and JavaScript. With one file, you can run a complete slide show and have a printer-friendly version as well. The markup used for the slides is very simple, highly semantic, and completely accessibl
presentations  free  opensource  pdf  powerpoint  alternative  code  communication  speaking  tutorials  howto  slideshow  css  xhtml 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Read - OLPC
"allows the laptop to act as a book reader. It has a simple interface, and will view many kinds of text and image based book-like materials (PDF files work currently). It will have particular strengths in handheld mode, with extremely low power consumptio
olpc  pdf  books  reading  ebooks 
january 2008 by robertogreco
WOWIO: Free Books + Free Minds
"only source where readers can legally download high-quality copyrighted ebooks from leading publishers for free. Readers have access to a wide range of offerings, including works of classic literature, college textbooks, comic books, and popular fiction
PDF  reading  olpc  ebooks  e-learning  books  comics  audiobooks  free  literature  graphicnovels 
january 2008 by robertogreco
PDF Hammer - Free Web Based PDF Editor
"allows you to edit your PDF files online for free. You don't need to install any additional software, you can edit PDF documents right now inside your browser. Once you start, you will be able to upload one or more PDF files into your project, arrange th
pdf  onlinetoolkit  editing 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Cool Tool: True Films eBook: The 200 best documentaries
"This is the third version of a guide I have been developing for the past 5 years. It takes the 200 best documentaries I have reviewed on my website True Films and puts them into one handy book."
film  ebooks  documentary  kevinkelly  books  ads  publishing  future  pdf  advertising 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Open Source Living
"Welcome to Open Source Living, an archive of the Web's best Open Source software, applications and references for a zero-cost / top quality digital experience."
opensource  aggregator  applications  productivity  ubuntu  Linux  software  windows  mac  online  graphics  audio  video  utilities  webdev  services  PDF  osx  freeware  onlinetoolkit  downloads  free  webdesign 
december 2007 by robertogreco
The Papernet
"There is a limit to computer magic because human language is also magic and computers are still dumb." see also: http://www.aaronland.info/weblog/2006/12/17/meat/#papernet
mobile  williamgibson  travel  ubicomp  wikipedia  internet  howwework  gamechanging  qrcodes  productivity  maps  mapping  paris  PDF  notebooks  moleskines  wikis  drawing  diy  archiving  wine  recipes  webdev  paper  webdesign 
december 2007 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] The Papernet
"Information wants to be used not managed...I want to use the Internets for the things they are good at — like distribution and searchification — but I am not ready to give up something I can hold in my hands."
mobile  williamgibson  travel  ubicomp  wikipedia  internet  howwework  gamechanging  qrcodes  productivity  maps  mapping  paris  PDF  notebooks  moleskines  wikis  drawing  diy  archiving  wine  recipes  webdev  paper  computing  webdesign 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Scribd
"Scribd is a Silicon Valley startup creating technology that makes it easy to share documents online. You can think of Scribd as a big online library where everyone can publish original content, including you!"
print  publishing  online  selfpublishing  diy  documents  sharing  pdf  internet  web  manuals  literature  filesharing  onlinetoolkit  documentation  converter  self-publishing 
november 2007 by robertogreco
The Kurt Vonnegut Library
"This website contains all of Kurt Vonnegut’s novels in .pdf form, hosted by the amazing Scribd."
books  literature  vonnegut  pdf  kurtvonnegut 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Free PDF Converter - create high-quality PDF from any printable file type
"Convert to PDF from any application by simply 'printing' to the PrimoPDF® printer - it couldn't be easier! Within minutes, you can create high-quality PDFs by converting from Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and virtually any other printable file type."
print  publishing  software  tools  utilities  web  writing  documents  PDF  free  freeware  windows  applications  text 
august 2006 by robertogreco
pdf 995: create PDF documents easily for free
"The pdf995 suite of products - Pdf995, PdfEdit995, and Signature995 - is a complete solution for your document publishing needs. It provides ease of use, flexibility in format, and industry-standard security- and all at no cost to you."
print  publishing  software  tools  utilities  web  writing  documents  PDF  free  freeware  windows  applications  text 
august 2006 by robertogreco

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