recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : a-poc   6

MIYAKE DESIGN STUDIO official site
"“A-POC” is an acronym for “A Piece of Cloth” and refers too, to the idea of “epoch.” It is a manufacturing method that uses computer technology to create clothing from a single piece of thread in a single process. Development began in 1997 as a project led by Issey Miyake and engineering designer Dai Fujiwara. The first results included ‘A-POC King & Queen, A-POC Le Feu’ and were presented in the Spring/Summer 1999 ISSEY MIYAKE Paris Collection. Following that, PLEATS PLEASE ISSEY MIYAKE and other collections began to develop items based upon the A-POC method (called “+A-POC”) starting in 2003. After 2007, the collection introduced design solutions under the subtext of "A-POC INSIDE" and has continued to refine its vision for making clothing."
a-poc  isseymiyake  1997  1999  fashion  fabric  textiles  sewing 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Issey Miyake – A Piece of Cloth | Tokyo Telephone - Your Direct Line to Real Japanese Fashion
"A wee while ago now, my dear friend and I hotfooted it to the Barbican gallery in London to see their exhibition “Future Beauty: 30 Years of Japanese Fashion” – both being huge fans of Japanese fashion, street and couture, we felt the need to check it out! I won’t spoil the exhibition for those planning to see it too, but I will say that we left feeling slightly stuffed full after gorging our eyes and brains on the clothing & video installations; totally worth it. Being the shopper & book fiend that I am, I was very happy to note the excellent selection of Japanese fashion books on offer in the gift shop – quick, update your Christmas wish lists now!

I think I know what I’d like Father Christmas to bring me this year: a piece of cloth. Preferably from Issey Miyake!

[images]

Usually here at Tokyo Telephone we strive to bring you the most up-to-date goings on in the wonderful melting pot of Japanese fashion, but I really felt that Dai Fujiwara’s A-POC (A Piece of Cloth) collection for Issey Miyake at the turn of the millennium was well worth a mention despite being a decade old, ancient history in fashion terms.

Traditionally Japanese fashion , particularly that of the 1980s when the Miyake brand began to take hold, was monochromatic – black being the favoured colour of everyone from sombre suited salary men to the young fashion elite on the Tokyo streets. So when we turned a corner at the Barbican exhibition, it was literally and figuratively: confronted with mannequins locked inside bright red material stretching up to the ceiling and back again. At once elegant and uncomfortable (a combination that Japanese design does best!) it was a visual spectacle at the very least.

The concept is an unusual one, as all the clothes in the A-POC collection are cut from a single long roll of fabric. A video installation of the catwalk premier showed the Issey Miyake team cutting a vast swath of cloth, and as if by the wonder of their magic scissors, all sort of garments appeared: socks, hats, tops, dresses… sort of like paper dolls for post-yuppie generation.

[image]

I did mention that the concept was unusual, maybe not entirely original: of course I have to mention kimono. Made in the age-old way from a single piece of cloth, perhaps beautifully dyed silk, the kimono requires no real tailoring and fits everyone no matter their weight or height. However, despite the inherent similarities to the fundamental construction of kimono, A-POC feels futuristic nonetheless. With bright primary colours and aching minimalism, there’s the sense that this collection could have been dreamed by a sci-fi writer in the 1960s, clothes and humans alike produced on huge rolls; cut to fit your taste.

[image]

The genius of Issey Miyake doesn’t stop at A-POC either: with another nod to Japanese traditions, consider the origami-like intricate folds of the Pleats Please collection. Anyone who can turn the above tightly folded material into the dress below is well deserving of praise! Like all the best magic tricks, my brain hurts just trying to work out how it’s done…

[image]

Issey Miyake: genius, visionary, traditionalist, magician, architect, and more.

[video]

Love this animation showing the attention paid to movement and line – a bit mesmerising."
a-poc  isseymiyake  1999  fashion  fabric  textiles  sewing  2010 
february 2015 by robertogreco
ISSEY MIYAKE - APOC Galaxy on Vimeo
"This project began as a still photograph for an exhibition by Miyake Design Studio at the Museu de Arte Moderna in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Designers Issey Miyake and Dai Fujiwara, asked us to create a photograph that would illustrate their concept of A-POC (A Piece of Cloth) wherein the finished fashion garment is woven into the bolt of cloth. When they saw the photograph they asked us if we could animate it.
isseymiyake.com

Produced by Trillium Studios (trilliumstudios.com)"
a-poc  isseymiyake  1999  fashion  fabric  textiles  sewing  2003  daifujiwara  video 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Wired 12.04: Seamless
"Issey Miyake saw the future of fashion. So he gave up haute couture to become a softwear engineer."
a-poc  isseymiyake  1999  fashion  fabric  textiles  sewing  2003 
february 2015 by robertogreco
ISSEY MIYAKE Official Site
"In 1998, Miyake began to develop A-POC (A Piece Of Cloth) with Dai Fujiwara. A-POC was not only able to create clothing with a high degree of variation, but was also able to control the amount created through the process of casting, where each thread receives computerized instructions. A-POC was revolutionary in that it began with a single thread and resulted in fabric, texture and a fully finished set of clothing in a single process. It led the way, along with the concept of engineering design, to a new methodology of clothing design. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York added this project to its permanent collection in 2006. In 1998, soon after Miyake started research on A-POC, he presented the ISSEY MIYAKE MAKING THINGS exhibition in Paris. (This later traveled to both New York and Tokyo.) The exhibition presented his work from Pleats (1988) onward and was widely acclaimed. “His work is grounded in that stretch of history called the present and draws meaning from fashion’s immediate context. ‘Making Things’ presents that context with immense glamour and wit.” (By Herbert Muschamp, December 27, 1998 The New York Times)"

[image]

"From the exhibition ISSEY MIYAKE MAKING THINGS, Museum of contemporary Art Tokyo, 2000.Just Before [black], A-POC King & Queen[red]
Photo : Yasuaki Yoshinaga"

[image]

"NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, Jan. 2003
P.72-73 “Weaving the Future” A-POC Quatro Cotton, 2001
Photo : Cary Wolinsky and Barbara Emmel Wolinsky
Shown by Alvin Ailey Dancer Dwana Adiaha Smallwood"

[image]

"The New York Times
Sunday, December 27, 1998"
a-poc  isseymiyake  1999  fashion  fabric  textiles  sewing  1998  2003  2000  2001 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Lurve - Home
"What is A-POC ?
Overlength sweaters, dresses off the roll, A-POCis based upon Miyake’s first design concept, a piece of cloth, is a new and unique suggestion for everyday life, which goes far beyond the boundaries of fashion.
It is made using an industrial knitting or weaving machine programed by a computer.
This process creates continuous tubes of fabric within which lie both shape and pattern. The customer cuts sleeves and skirts exactly to the length he wants. It is an idea that totally overthrows the existing standards for making clothes.
A-POC is made in a sequence in which thread literally goes into a machine and re-emerges as a piece of clothing, an accessory, or even a chair. This interactive new method not only reduces leftover fabric but also permits the wearers to participate in the final step of the design of their clothing: they determine the final shape of the product.
Mass production and custom-made clothing, seemingly opposing ideas, become compatible with each other through the wizardry of technology and the fire of imagination.

Images from A-POC MAKING
ISSEY MIYAKE & DAI FUJIWARA
Vitra Design Museum
1999
Alien
Eskimo
They were among the Issey Miyake Autumn-Winter 1999 Collection held on March 10 at la Grande Halle de la Villette, Salle Charlie Parker, Paris.
” Alien” was made of double layers of airy knitted mesh to add interest and depth.
” Eskimo”, with padded geometric patterns, had three-dimentional interest."
a-poc  isseymiyake  1999  fashion  fabric  textiles  sewing 
february 2015 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read