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robertogreco : aarhus   5

2097: We Made Ourselves Over
"It’s 2097 and the days of upheaval are over. A new resilience has taken hold.

Three young girls must make a decision which will affect their entire city, as well as members of their own families. The future of the city relies on their ability to embrace the unknown, face the future and act.

2097: We Made Ourselves Over takes you on a journey to the cusp of the next century. Come into a world where consciousness is transferred from the dead to the living. See molecular harvesters destroy cities and rebuild them.

In five short science fiction films – each accompanied by an interactive film for smartphones – and through live events across both Hull and Aarhus, 2097: We Made Ourselves Over explores the belief that everyone has the power to act and influence the future – uncovering the unnerving and exhilarating idea that anything is possible.

Step into the future here…"



[See also: "Film 1 Eternal Data | 2097: We Made Ourselves Over"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTT0s5hBj0k

" http://wemadeourselvesover.com

An elder has died and has left her consciousness to Hessa, one of the rulers of the city.

At Hessa's command, a tanker filled with molecular harvesters has arrived offshore.

The destruction of the entire city will start with a funeral...

Audio described version available to watch here: https://vimeo.com/236561513

---

2097: We Made Ourselves Over is the culmination of a year long project inviting residents and future experts from Aarhus, Hull and beyond to describe their hopes for the coming century.

Find out more about the ideas behind the future world and the making of the project here: http://wemadeourselvesover.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/blasttheory
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blasttheory
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/blasttheory/

2097 is an ambitious international collaboration bringing together Aarhus European Capital of Culture 2017 and Hull UK City of Culture 2017"]

["Film 2 Gellerholme First | 2097: We Made Ourselves Over"
"Hessa and the other two rulers choose the first area to be destroyed."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIqs6wKNoCc

"Film 3 The Handover | 2097: We Made Ourselves Over"
"Having begun to download the consciousness that she has inherited, Hessa prepares to step down"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4rze6bI8_M

"Film 4 Moving Out | 2097: We Made Ourselves Over"
"Hessa's mother packs her possessions as the molecular harvesters move in."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kByJfJoS7xI

"Film 5 Hessa's Film | 2097: We Made Ourselves Over"
"Hessa records the long walk through the marshes towards the new city."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qSqux-3kv0

"Credits | 2097: We Made Ourselves Over"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hy5GMEUwOQc ]
film  towatch  blasttheory  2017  2097  aarhus  hull  consciousness  funerals  death  future  cities 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Urban Omnibus » Precedents for Experimentation: Talking Libraries with Shannon Mattern and Nate Hill
"Mattern: That’s interesting. In the branch library design study I’m working on with The Architectural League and the Center for an Urban Future, one of multiple challenges is to “find closets,” which is to say, to make minor modulations in order to offer the kind of access you are able to provide in Chattanooga.

Hill: I know what you mean. But it’s not always about the size of the space. When I talk to other library systems around the country about how they can take on the types of activities that we support here, it’s about making decisions. It’s about observing how library users are actually using the facility and then creating structures to enable those users to engage in the different activities they want to be doing.

When you look at the branches in New York City, some library advocates like to cite the high circulation statistics as a means of measuring success. But then you see the banks of public computers and how long the wait is to get online. I think there are great opportunities for branch library systems to diversify what public computing is, and to make some hard decisions about how to use your space.

Earlier today I was speaking with a council of local mayors about the work we do at the library and its context within downtown redevelopment. And the ideas that you have written about — the notion of the library as a piece of flexible infrastructure — really resonated with these officials. Your mention of the Rem Koolhaas design for the Seattle Public Library reminds me of an issue of Volume magazine about architecture as a content management system. That was a powerful read for me. Our job is to move information objects around a complex system, and a library user’s view of the data depends on where she is and how the information is being sorted."



"Hill: I hear a lot about how browsability and serendipity are essential to the library experience. Personally, I love looking through shelves and stacks. But it’s not an efficient way to use the prime real estate where libraries should ideally be located. Browsing has moved online. In New York as well as here in Chattanooga, I see a huge shift in people wanting to pick up their materials wherever is most convenient to them. If the buildings have fewer stacks of books, those spaces can become community platforms, where people can engage with one another and with the distributed nature of knowledge in that community. The content, the collection, can be sent there."



"Hill: Looking around the US, most of the excellent libraries in our country are in smaller systems that are able to be more agile. The state of Colorado is filled with good library systems, such as Douglas County or the Rangeview Library District, which rebranded itself “Anythink.”

But we need to figure out how to get this right in our big cities. I think they’re working really hard in Chicago. It’s a massive challenge and very exciting.

I just came back from checking out a fascinating project in Greece, where the Stavros Niarchos Foundation is building a cultural center that will house the national library, an opera house, and a botanical garden. I’ve spent some time checking out branch libraries in Copenhagen; I regularly look to Scandinavia for inspiration.

Aarhus, Denmark, is a good example. One of the smartest things about their project was that they started doing transformation work early on: an iterative process of trying out new services and community engagement techniques in their old building. So by the time that they open this new, incredible space, there won’t be any surprises about the services being provided or how it will be staffed.

In Helsinki, there’s a project called Library 10. In the US, we give a lot of lip service to the idea of co-working in the library. But in Finland, it really works: people come in and use their library cards to check out portable screens and create a work area."



"Mattern: I think the social service sector needs to be engaged. Returning to the notion that libraries often pick up slack where other institutions fall short, I think we need to recognize the library as part of an ecosystem of social-cultural knowledge resources. I think the library conversation needs to include university presidents; school superintendents and principals; advocates who deal with affordable housing, recent immigrants, or other disenfranchised populations; real estate developers; and other people with innovative ideas for co-location or partnerships."
2014  shannonmattern  architecture  libraries  design  engagement  servicedesign  natehill  chattanooga  bookmobiles  aarhus  makers  makerspaces  lcproject  openstudioproject  browsability  serendipity 
july 2014 by robertogreco
What I’m working on lately: Practices of the minimum viable utopia (long) | Speedbird
"In the fusion of each of these three archetypal processes, el Campo de Cebada, Godsbanen and Unto This Last, we can see the outlines of something truly radical and terribly exciting beginning to resolve. What can be made out, gleaming in the darkness, is a — partial, incomplete, necessarily insufficient, but hugely important — way of responding to the disappearance of meaningful jobs from our cities, as well as all the baleful second-order effects that attend that disappearance.

When apologists for the technology industry trumpet the decontextualized factoid that each “tech” job ostensibly creates five new service positions as a secondary effect, what they neglect to mention is that the lion’s share of those jobs will as a matter of course prove to be the kind of insecure, short-term, benefits-lacking, at-or-close-to-minimum-wage positions that typify the contemporary service sector. This sort of employment can’t come anywhere close to the (typically unionized) industrial-sector jobs of the twentieth century in their capacity to bind a community together, either in the income and benefits they produce by way of compensation, in the conception of self and competence they generate in those who hold them, or in the sense of solidarity with others similarly situated that they generally evoke.

At the same time, though, like many others, I too believe it would be foolish to artifically inflate employment by propping up declining smokestack industries with public-sector subsidies. Why, for example, continue to maintain Detroit’s automobile manufacturers on taxpayer-funded life support, when their approach to the world is so deeply retrograde, their product so very corrosive environmentally and socially, their behavior so irresponsible and their management so blitheringly, hamfistedly incompetent? That which is falling should also be pushed, surely. But that can’t ethically be done until something of comparable scale has been found to replace industrial manufacturing jobs as the generator of local economic vitality and the nexus of local community.

So where might meaningful, valued, value-generating employment be found — “employment” in the deepest sense of that word? I have two ways of answering that question:

- In the immediate term, I believe in the material and economic significance of digital fabrication technologies largely using free and open-source plans, deployed in small, clean, city-center workshops, under democratic community control. While these will never remotely be of a scale to replace all the vanished industrial jobs of the past, they offer us at least one favorable prospect those industrial jobs never could: the direct production of items immediately useful and valuable in one’s own life. Should such workshops be organized in such a way as to offer skills training (perhaps for laid-off service-sector workers, elders or at-risk youth), they present a genuinely potent economic and social proposition.

There are provisos. The Surly Urbanist correctly suggests that any positions created in such an endeavor need to be good jobs, i.e. not simply minimum-wage dronework, and my friend Rena Tom also notes that the skills training involved should be something more comprehensive than a simple set of instructions on how to run a CNC milling machine — that any such course of instruction would be most enduringly valuable if it amounted to an apprenticeship first in the manual and only later the numeric working of materials. I also want to be very clear that, per the kind of inclusive decision-making processes used at el Campo de Cebada, such a workshop would have to be something a community itself collectively thinks is worth experimenting with and investing in, not something inflicted upon it by guileless technoutopians from afar.

- In the fullness of time, I believe that the use of relatively high-technology techniques to accomplish not merely the local, autonomous production of everyday objects, furnitures and infrastructures, but their refit and repair, will come to be an economically salient activity in the global North. In this I see a congelation of several existing tendencies, logics or dynamics: the ideologically-driven retreat of the State from responsibility for stewardship of the everyday environment; the accelerating attrition and degradation of the West’s dated and undermaintained infrastructures, and their concomitant need for upgrade or replacement; increasing belief in the desirability of densifying urban infill; the rising awareness in the developed world of jugaad, gambiarra and other cultures of repair, reuse and improvisation; the emergence of fabricator-enabled adaptive upcycling; the circulation of a massive stock of recyclable componentry (in the form of obsolescent structures as well as landfill-bound but effectively nondegradable consumer items), coupled to the emergence of a favorable economics of materials recovery; broader experience with and understanding of networked, horizontal and leaderless organizational structures; the creation of a robust informational commons, including repositories of freely-downloadable specifications; and finally the clear capability of online platforms to facilitate development and sharing of the necessary knowledge, maintain some degree of standardization (or at least harmonization) of practice, suggest sites where citizen repair might constitute a useful intervention, and support processes of democratic decision-making."
utopia  2014  adamgreenfield  openstudioproject  pocketsofresistance  resistance  institutforx  godbanen  aarhus  madrid  spain  españa  elcampodecebada  untothislast  london  making  makerculture  economics  production  fabrication  democracy  labor  upcycling  collectivism  collaboration  repair  furniture  agency  denmark  davidharvey  postcapitalism  sharingeconomy  sharing  libraries  lcproject  community  communities  cooperatives  anilbawa-cavia  renatom  airbnb  couchsurfing  kintsugi  seams  minimumviableutopia  douglasmeehan  idealism  practicalism  jeremyrifkin  self-reliance  murraybookchin  jugaad  fabbing  gambiarra  fixing  maintenance  cv  repairing 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Institut for ( X )
"Institut for (X) is a culture and business platform for young designers, musicians, artists, entrepreneurs and craftsmen working side by side. 
Located in a former customs building, Institut for (X) is a part of Godsbanen, a former railway traffic area now officially dedicated by the municipality of Aarhus to become a future culture hub in the very heart of the city.

Institut for (X) startet as a Bureau Detours project, and is now run by a number of cultural organizations and small businesses, where Bureau Detours now is one of them. The various buildings in the area include various workshop- and office facilities which may be used for projects of all sizes.

A number of non-commercial cultural events (organized by ourselves, the municipality of Aarhus, various international and Danish artists and other art and cultural initiatives) have taken place here. Everything from art exhibitions, concerts, children- and family events, municipal meetings, “open house”, cultural salons, festivals and more."

[via: Can you smell what I'm brewing, beloved? Mate these 3 things: http://www.untothislast.co.uk/ http://www.institutforx.dk/ http://elcampodecebada.org/ Wildcat production in the city center! Things made for use! Lifelong skills training! A feeling of pride in using what one has made!

https://twitter.com/agpublic/status/452873190432579584
https://twitter.com/agpublic/status/452873398608486400

You've really got to strip the lame jargon from this, because there's actually something special going on here. MTK. http://www.institutforx.dk/ Århus has figured out something sensitively dependent on a whole lot of boundary conditions, that cities worldwide are. fapping themselves silly in an attempt to figure out, and are broadly failing in the effort. There are lessons to be learned. Men & women both — of all ages & not obviously hipsterized — making things for use. Coworking/makerspaces worldwide could learn from this. Also, a legible gradient of formality and structure, accessible at any point & traversable in either direction. Anyway, I'm super-inspired by the design principles at work here, and the unexpected resonances with projects like http://elcampodecebada.org/

https://twitter.com/agpublic/status/451749891061317632
https://twitter.com/agpublic/status/451750190668853248
https://twitter.com/agpublic/status/451750344008413184
https://twitter.com/agpublic/status/451762820351533056
https://twitter.com/agpublic/status/451764811945500672
https://twitter.com/agpublic/status/451765570028179456 ]
denmark  lcproject  openstudioproject  aarhus  institutforx 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Aarhus Gymnastics and Motor Skills Hall / C. F. Møller Architects | ArchDaily
"The children of Aarhus now have a unique hall to romp in. Aarhus Gymnastics and Motor Skills Hall, designed by C. F. Møller Architects, combines the best of the sports hall and playground and is the only one of its kind in Denmark – probably worldwide.

The Motor Skills Hall is an extension of the Aarhus Gymnastics and Trampoline Hall. The idea of the approximately 1.200 m2 of activity landscape is to invite and motivate children aged three to ten to develop motor skills while having fun playing. Possible future users of the hall are sporting associations, schools, youth centres, kindergartens, families etc."
denmark  education  schooldesign  recreation  aarhus  design  architecture  play 
november 2010 by robertogreco

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