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Digital Manifesto Archive
"This collection aggregates manifestos concerned with making as a subpractice of the digital humanities."



"This archive is an academic resource dedicated to aggregating and cataloging manifestos that fall under two basic criteria. 1) The Digital Manifesto Archive features manifestos that focus on the political and cultural dimensions of digital life. 2) The Digital Manifesto Archive features manifestos that are written, or are primarily disseminated, online.

The manifesto genre is, by definition, timely and politically focused. Further, it is a primary site of political, cultural, and social experimentation in our contemporary world. Manifestos that are created and disseminated online further this experimental ethos by fundamentally expanding the character and scope of the genre.

Each category listed on the archive is loosely organized by theme, political affiliation, and (if applicable) time period. While the political movements and affiliations of the manifestos archived in each category are not universal, each category does try to capture a broad spectrum of political moods and actions with regard to its topic.

This site is meant to preserve manifestos for future research and teaching. The opinions expressed by each author are their own.

This archive was created by Matt Applegate. Our database and website was created by Graham Higgins (gwhigs). It is maintained by Matt Applegate and Yu Yin (Izzy) To
You can contact us at digitalmanifestoarchive@gmail.com.

This project is open source. You can see gwhigs' work for the site here: Digital Manifesto Archive @ Github.com"
manifestos  digital  digitalhumanities  archives  making  mattapplegate  yuyin  designfiction  criticalmaking  engineering  capitalism  feminism  hacking  hacktivism  digitalmarkets  digitaldiaspora  internetofthings  iot  cyberpunk  mediaecology  media  publishing  socialmedia  twitter  ethics  digitalculture  piracy  design  bigdata  transhumanism  utopianism  criticaltheory  mediaarchaeology  opensource  openaccess  technofeminism  gaming  digitalaesthetics  digitaljournalism  journalism  aesthetics  online  internet  web  technocracy  archaeology  education  afrofuturism  digitalart  art  blogging  sopa  aaronswartz  pipa  anarchism  anarchy 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Against School | New Republic
"In this previously unpublished essay, Aaron Swartz sought an explanation for the persistent—and possible deliberate—failures in our school system."



"Linda Perlstein spent a year at one school struggling to survive No Child Left Behind. Everything that wasn’t tested had to get cut—not just art and gym, but recess, science, and social studies (yep, no science on the tests). What remains is converted entirely over to test prep—the only writing students ever do is short answer sections (“What text feature could have been added to help a reader better understand the information?”) and the stories in class are analyzed only in terms of what questions might be asked about them.

Large sections of the class have nothing to do with learning at all. Students are instead drilled on test-taking procedure: take deep breaths, work until time is called, eliminate obviously wrong answers. Every day students are taught special vocab words that will earn them extra points and reminded about how to properly phrase their answers to get the maximum score. Instead of covering the walls with students’ art, they’re covered with test-taking advice (“BATS: Borrow from the question, Answer the question, use Text supports, Stretch the formula”).

The single-minded goal of maximizing test scores has been a blessing for the textbook market, which forces schools to buy expensive “evidence-based curricula” which has been “proven” to maximize test scores. The packages include not only textbooks and workbooks but also scripts for the teachers to read verbatim—deviating from them hasn’t been proven to raise test scores, and is thus prohibited. The package also comes with trained supervisors who drop in on teachers to make sure they’re actually sticking to the script.

The effect on the students is almost heartbreaking. Taught that reading is simply about searching contrived stories for particular “text features,” they learn to hate reading. Taught that answering questions is simply about cycling through the multiple choice answers to find the most plausible ones, they begin to stop thinking altogether and just spout random combinations of test buzzwords whenever they’re asked a question. “The joy of finding things out” is banished from the classroom. Testing is in session.

Such drills don’t teach children anything about the world, but it does teach them “skills”—skills like how to follow senseless orders and sit at your desk for hours at a time. Critics of high-stakes testing say that it isn’t working as planned: teachers are teaching to the test instead of making sure kids actually learn. But maybe that is actually the plan. After all, employers seem to like it just fine."
schools  schooling  education  capitalism  2015  aaronswartz  business  influence  money  testing  learning  nclb 
january 2016 by robertogreco
The Internet’s Own Boy — The Message — Medium
"I don’t believe the system can be saved from within, but I’m glad many of my friends do — I might be wrong. In fact, I’d love to be wrong. But I couldn’t look in the face of my beloved and tell him I believed his life’s work in political reform would be effective. I was too damaged, I’d seen too much terrible violence from the American system to believe in it anymore."



"The American people have spent my whole life telling themselves stories that let them off the hook when it comes to being responsible wardens of our country and our world. And you’re still doing it. You’re even using my dead, beloved Aaron to do it, whom you let die. People love to say Aaron was a genius, and prodigy, and there’s no one like him. But he wasn’t. He just cared and believed in things and he let his care and his belief move his life. You could do that any day, any minute. You could be like any of the characters in this movie, all of whom are real people, and let your convictions be more important than your job or your mortgage or your debt or any of the million little things Americans let keep them small and separated and afraid. You could organize your communities. You could help Taren’s efforts to pressure companies into being better actors on the global stage. You could help by contributing to Larry’s superpac attempt to reform our broken democracy. You could listen to Ben’s stories of political reform, and get involved in the issues he talks about. You could even come over to my side of our grand debate and try to work out how to build a society without government as we know it.

But you can’t just sit there and call Aaron a hero and a genius and whatever. He is dead. He is dust. He is now just one more of the millions of victims of this American dream that has only been a nightmare for so many.

Your ass will be in a seat watching a movie. When it is done, get up, and do something."
openaccess  technology  internet  quinnnorton  aaronswartz  2014  activism  convictions  excuses  systemschange 
june 2014 by robertogreco
When you see someone and think they need help, you can press help into their hand. — Ford’s Sensorium — Medium
"Look, the few dollars my grandfather pressed into my hand didn’t change my situation. I probably used them to buy soda. Giving money to Aaron would not have made an observable dent in his legal fees or saved his life, just as the money we gave to my wife’s cousin won’t save his life.

This morning, as I was thinking about all of this, a woman asked me for a dollar as I walked up Coney Island Avenue, and I didn’t give her the dollar.

I try to be a generous person but often fail at it. I try to be a polite person, but I can also be a fearful person. I’ll do everything I can to avoid embarrassing others, but that isn’t the same as kindness.

When you see someone and think they need help, you can press help into their hand. They may refuse it, but you can, if you choose, press help into their hand."
charity  paulford  ftrain  generosity  money  help  kindness  2014  aaronswartz 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Stanford: Tuesday, December 7 (Aaron Swartz: The Weblog)
"As usual, grades are about following orders, not doing something worthwhile"
grades  grading  stanford  aaronswartz  education  learning  authority  via:lukeneff 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Stanford: Day 3 (Aaron Swartz: The Weblog)
"If I wanted to start a more effective university, it would be pretty simple: Hire the smartest people and accept the smartest students, get them to work on projects that interest them, get them to work together on stuff that interests them, organize a bunch of show-and-tells and mixers, and for the most part let them figure stuff out on their own. (This system might be cheaper too.)"
highered  highereducation  openstudioproject  lcproject  unschooling  aaronswartz  2005  education  learning  learningbydoing  via:lukeneff 
january 2014 by robertogreco
The Web as a Preservation Medium | inkdroid
"So how to wrap up this strange, fragmented, incomplete tour through Web preservation? I feel like I should say something profound, but I was hoping these stories of the Web would do that for me. I can only say for myself that I want to give back to the Web the way it has given to me. With 25 years behind us the Web needs us more than ever to help care for the archival slivers it contains. I think libraries, museums and archives that realize that they are custodians of the Web, and align their mission with the grain of the Web, will be the ones that survive, and prosper. Brian Fitzpatrick, Jason Scott, Brewster Kahle, Mislav Marohnic, Philip Cromer, Jeremy Ruten and Aaron Swartz demonstrated their willingness to work with the Web as a medium in need of preservation, as well as a medium for doing the preservation. We need more of them. We need to provide spaces for them to do their work. They are the new faces of our profession."
archiving  web  digitalpreservation  digital  facebook  archiveteam  archives  twitter  internet  edsummers  2013  preservation  aaronswartz  timberners-lee  marshallmcluhan  kisagitelman  matthewkirschenbaum  davidbrunton  linkrot  www  adamliptak  supremecourt  scotus  lapsteddomains  brewsterkahle  urls  html  permalinks  paulbausch  jasonscott  mihaiparparita  zombiereader  googlereader  impermanence  markpilgrim  jonathangillette  rss  _why  information  markdown  mslavmarohnic  philipcromer  jeremyruten  github  williamgibson  degradation  data  cern  grailbird  google  davewiner  rufuspollock  distributed  decentralization  collaboration  brianfitzpatrick 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Memory to myth: tracing Aaron Swartz through the 21st century | The Verge
"“if you’re in the tech sector, why are you there? What do you really believe in? If you believe that technology is making the world a better place, why do you believe that? Do you really understand what makes the world a bad place to begin with?” When I think of Aaron, living out of a backpack even after he’d become wealthy, challenging other activists and philanthropists as irrational and unproductive, and unable to eat much more than white rice or water crackers without pain, I think that discomfort is entirely appropriate. We should be uncomfortable. We should be asking better questions. We should see nothing as inevitable."
journalism  information  technology  2013  ethics  aaronswartz  activism  timcarmody  techsector  copyright  purpose  education  tech  politics  values  policy 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Aaron Swartz | HiLobrow
I'm using this bookmark to post the following collection of links to other posts in reaction to Aaron Swartz's death:

Cory Doctorow
http://boingboing.net/2013/01/12/rip-aaron-swartz.html

Quinn Norton
http://www.quinnnorton.com/said/?p=641
http://www.quinnnorton.com/said/?p=644

danah boyd
http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts/archives/2013/01/13/aaron-swartz.html

Matthew Battles
http://hilobrow.com/2013/01/13/aaron-swartz/

Rick Perlstein
http://www.thenation.com/blog/172187/aaron-swartz

Lawrence Lessig
http://lessig.tumblr.com/post/40347463044/prosecutor-as-bully

Audrey Watters
http://audreywatters.com/2013/01/13/for-aaron-swartz/

David Weinberger
http://www.hyperorg.com/blogger/2013/01/13/aaron-swartz-was-not-a-hacker-he-was-a-builder/

Brewster Kahle
http://blog.archive.org/2013/01/12/aaron-swartz-hero-of-the-open-world-rip/

Alex Stamos (expert witness in his case)
http://unhandled.com/2013/01/12/the-truth-about-aaron-swartzs-crime/

Jacob Bacharach
http://jacobbacharach.wordpress.com/2013/01/13/the-days-when-we-had-rest-o-soul-for-they-were-long/

Ethan Zuckerman
http://www.ethanzuckerman.com/blog/2013/01/12/goodbye-aaron/

Matt Haughey (on a Metafilter post for Aaron's death)
http://www.metafilter.com/123777/Open-access-open-internet-closed-book#4772018

Tim Berners-Lee
http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-tag/2013Jan/0017.html

Tim Lee
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/01/12/aaron-swartz-american-hero/

John Gruber
http://daringfireball.net/linked/2013/01/12/aaronsw

The Economist
http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2013/01/remembering-aaron-swartz

EFF
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2013/01/farewell-aaron-swartz

Matthew Ingram (Gigaom, threaded snippets from elsewhere)
http://gigaom.com/2013/01/12/the-web-responds-to-the-death-of-hacker-activist-aaron-swartz/

Doc Searles (with many links to others within)
http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/doc/2013/01/12/losing-aaron-swartz/

Scott Beale (with a long collection of pointers elsewhere)
http://laughingsquid.com/aaron-swartz-1986-2013-web-technologist-internet-activist/

A Storify by Alex Howard collecting tweets and posts from around the web
http://storify.com/digiphile/the-internet-mourns-the-death-of-aaron-swartz

Digsby
http://digbysblog.blogspot.com/2013/01/it-is-product-of-criminal-justice.html

Derek Willis
http://dwillis.net/post/40483840271/on-aaron-swartz

Democracy Now
http://www.democracynow.org/2013/1/14/an_incredible_soul_lawrence_lessig_remembers
http://www.democracynow.org/2013/1/14/freedom_to_connect_aaron_swartz_1986

Truthout
http://truth-out.org/opinion/item/13915-aaron-swartz-a-spark-in-life-and-death

Family statement and memory page
http://www.rememberaaronsw.com/

Memorial Service in NYC:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3Fz1V3LZtw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BI4Udqk56dI

Aaron
http://www.aaronsw.com/2002/continuity
https://aaronsw.jottit.com/
http://archive.org/details/aaronsw
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:AaronSw
http://www.aaronsw.com/
https://pinboard.in/u:aaronsw
aaronswartz  2013  RIP 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Remembering Aaron Swartz | The Nation
"How long was it before I learned instead that he actually was a ball of pure coruscation…"

"Legally blind, it turned out; and then when he got contact lenses, he gave us an account of what it felt like to leave Plato’s cave: “I had no idea the world really looked like this, with such infinite clarity. It looks like a modernist photo or a hyperreal film, everything in focus everywhere. Everyone kept saying ‘oh, do you see the leaves now?’ but the first thing I saw was not the leaves but the people. People, individuated, each with brilliant faces and expressions at gaits, the sun streaming down upon them. I couldn’t help but smile. It’s much harder being a misanthrope when you can see people’s faces.”"
aaronswartz  rickperlstein  misanthropy  misanthropes  people  beauty  2012 
january 2013 by robertogreco
The City with No Heart (Aaron Swartz's Raw Thought)
"Unlike every other city I’ve seen from the air, LA has no gradient surrounding a downtown. It just suddenly appears and then is simply there."

"Instead, I wonder about the fractal nature of coastlines — does their length grow with out bound or simply converge as you measure them more finely? (It grows without bound.)"

"The reflected sunlight before me refracts to form a perfect rainbow, strips of dark red fading into orange fading into yellow then light blue then blue. And for one beautiful moment, before the whole thing fades away into an inky blackness, the colors are laid out perfectly, just the way I’ve seen them in prisms and diagrams so many times before, a beautiful sympathy of color. And then my head really does explode, the beauty sending shockwaves through my body.

That is how I will remember LA: this beautiful strip of sunset."
losangeles  2006  aaronswartz  light  sunsets  colors  color  beauty  gradients  cities 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Raw Meat: Therefore, daily and hourly, the politician... [Max Weber on self-skepticism]
"Therefore, daily and hourly, the politician inwardly has to overcome a quite trivial and all-too-human enemy: a quite vulgar vanity, the deadly enemy of all matter-of-fact devotion to a cause, and of all distance, in this case, of distance towards one’s self.

…The sin against the lofty spirit of his vocation, however, begins where this striving for power ceases to be objective and becomes purely personal self-intoxication, instead of exclusively entering the service of ‘the cause.’ For ultimately there are only two kinds of deadly sins in the field of politics: lack of objectivity and—often but not always identical with it—irresponsibility. Vanity, the need personally to stand in the foreground as clearly as possible, strongly tempts the politician to commit one or both of these sins.

…The final result of political action often, no, even regularly, stands in completely inadequate and often even paradoxical relation to its original meaning…"

[Continues on just a bit more.]
causes  identity  self  vanity  politicalaction  irresponsibility  objectivity  self-intoxication  power  aaronswartz  maxweber  2012  vocations  politics 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Look at yourself objectively (Aaron Swartz's Raw Thought)
"Looking at ourselves objectively isn’t easy. But it’s essential if we ever want to get better. And if we don’t do it, we leave ourselves open to con artists and ethical compromisers who prey on our desire to believe we’re perfect. There’s no one solution, but here are some tricks I use to get a more accurate sense of myself:

Embrace your failings. …

Studiously avoid euphemism. …

Reverse your projections. …

Look up, not down. …

Criticize yourself. …

Find honest friends. …

Listen to the criticism. …

Take the outside view."
constructivecriticism  vulnerability  humility  honesty  oprah  mindchanging  mindchanges  change  behavior  ignazsemmelweis  learning  feedback  advice  self-improvement  wisdom  fear  failure  psychology  self-image  perspective  euphemisms  criticalfriends  collegiality  criticism  self-criticism  selfimprovement  2012  aaronswartz 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Believe you can change (Aaron Swartz's Raw Thought)
"Growth mindset has become a kind of safe word for my partner and I. Whenever we feel the other person getting defensive or refusing to try something because “I’m not any good at it”, we say “Growth mindset!” and try to approach the problem as a chance to grow, rather than a test of our abilities. It’s no longer scary, it’s just another project to work on."
failure  resilience  persistence  introverts  2012  growthmindset  via:litherland  caroldweck  aaronswartz  psychology 
august 2012 by robertogreco
The Greatness of College Lectures (Aaron Swartz's Raw Thought)
"you need to learn ways of thinking. These are what lectures, at their best, can provide. They show you how the speakers think about problems, how they feel about them, and, in doing so, provide a more fleshed-out notion than writing ever could."
lectures  presentations  thinking  edwardtufte  scottmccloud  aaronswartz  2006  larrylessig  education  learning  writing  speaking  via:Preoccupations  openminded  mindchanges  mindchanging 
may 2012 by robertogreco
The Awfulness of College Lectures (Aaron Swartz's Raw Thought)
"The other day someone asked me why more people don't watch the recordings of MIT lectures made available for free online. This is why. … How did this become the primary method of education?"
education  presentations  talks  lectures  learning  aaronswartz  2006  teaching  via:Preoccupations 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Accessibility vs. access: How the rhetoric of “rare” is changing in the age of information abundance » Nieman Journalism Lab
"…digital archivists solve the barrier of accessibility, by making content previously tucked away in analog archives available to the world wide web…

What great curators do is reverse-engineer this dynamic, framing cultural importance first to magnify our motivation to engage with information…shares that manuscript in the context of how it relates to today’s ideals and challenges of publishing, to our shared understanding of creative labor and the changing value systems of authorship, will help integrate this archival item with your existing knowledge and interests, bridging your curiosity with your motivations to truly engage with the content.

Because in a culture where abundance has replaced scarcity as our era’s greatest information problem, without these human sensemakers and curiosity sherpas, even the most abundant and accessible information can remain tragically “rare.”"

[There's more to this. Better to read the entire thing.]
history  photography  information  archives  accessibility  mariapopova  curation  curating  curatorialteaching  curiosity  context  storytelling  relevance  flickrcommons  2011  digitalhumanities  classideas  cv  digitalcurators  infocus  openculture  dancolman  andybaio  metafilter  brainpickings  aaronswartz  filterbubble  elipariser  jamesgleick  abundance  scarcity  obscurity  infooverload 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The difference between Google and Aaron Swartz | MediaFile
"Aaron’s arrest should be a wake up call to universities–evidence of how fundamentally broken this core piece of their architecture remains despite d ecades of progress in advancing communication and collaboration.

The MIT staff who called the FBI would have been served better by calling the chancellor to ask, “How have we created a system that forces 25 year-olds to sneak around in the basement, hiding hard-drives in closets in order ask basic and important questions about our work? Can’t we do better?”"
academia  publishing  openaccess  aaronswartz  datascraping  law  legal  mit  jstor  technology  2011 
july 2011 by robertogreco

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