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Resistance Journal #1 | interdome
"I thought, at first, that I didn’t want to write about this week. But writing is what I know how to do, and it is the anchor I have to hold.

I haven’t written about politics as such, or protest, since 2012. Sometime after May Day of that year was the end of Occupy, when it was clear that whatever had happened was over, and we were back to normal. That is, we were back to the status quo. Politics continued.

Politics continued all the way through this year. Bombs were dropped. People were shot. Politicians said fucked up things and no one cared. No one did anything substantive to help us avert climate change. The social fabric of our society continued to wear thin. This is the story of history, and we all know it.

There isn’t a point at which things ever change significantly. There is no such thing as an epoch. But there is a point at which you have personal realizations. There is a point at which you make decisions. It is realizations and decisions that matter in the long run. The rest is just a story we tell later on.

There is no question as to whether we ought to resist. There comes a point in time when you realize, in order to continue to be yourself, in order to continue to care about your friends, family, and loved ones, in order to consider oneself a human being, one must resist. There is no other option, save death.

The only question now is how.

And this is where things get difficult, because there is so much one can do, but so much of it feels ineffective. So much of it feels dangerous. There is so much that is unknown, and so little that can be said for sure.

But here is what we do know: we will enter a state of resistance. That begins now if it has not already, and so now is the time to prepare.

The thing I’ve been doing this week is getting in contact with people. Reaching out and letting people know that I am here, setting up reasonably secure means of contacting them. I’ve been doing this with people I know, but I need to start reaching out to people I don’t know. We need to find each other, and start building networks.

More to come, as I figure it out.

Meanwhile, here are a few things I’ve read that seemed helpful:

• How to Easily be a White Ally to Marginalized Communities
• Alternate Support Structures: What You Can Do Right Now
• Speak Up: Responding to Everyday Bigotry"


[Resistance Journal #2
https://northwesternanomaly.wordpress.com/2016/11/15/resistance-journal-2/

Resistance Journal #3
https://northwesternanomaly.wordpress.com/2016/11/16/resistance-journal-3/

Resistance Journal #4
https://northwesternanomaly.wordpress.com/2016/11/20/resistance-journal-4/ ]
resistance  2016  bigotry  elections  donaldtrump  adamrothstein  activism  politics 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Rhizome | How to See Infrastructure: A Guide for Seven Billion Primates
"If we lift up the manhole cover, lock-out the equipment, unscrew the housing, and break the word into components, infrastructure means, simply, below-structure. Like infrared, the below-red energy just outside of the reddish portion of the visible light section of the electromagnetic spectrum. Humans are not equipped to see infrared with our evolved eyes, but we sometimes feel it as radiated heat.

Infrastructure is drastically important to our way of life, and largely kept out of sight. It is the underground, the conduited, the containerized, the concreted, the shielded, the buried, the built up, the broadcast, the palletized, the addressed, the routed. It is the underneath, the chassis, the network, the hidden system, the combine, the conspiracy. There is something of a paranoiac, occult quality to it. James Tilly Matthews, one of the first documented cases of what we now call schizophrenia, spoke of a thematic style of hallucination described by many suffering from the condition, always rewritten in the technological language of the era. In Matthews' 18th Century description, there existed an invisible "air loom," an influencing machine harnessing rays, magnets, and gases, run by a secret cabal, able to control people for nefarious motives. Infrastructure's power, combined with its lack of visibility, is the stuff of our society's physical unconscious.

Perhaps because infrastructure wields great power and lacks visibility, it is of particular concern to artists and writers who bring the mysterious influencing machines into public discourse through their travels and research."
adamrothstein  infrastructure  cities  2015  allansekula  charmainechua  jamestillymatthews  unknownfieldsdivision  liamyoung  katedavies  timmaughan  danwilliams  shipping  centerforlanduseinterpretation  nicolatwilley  timmaly  emilyhorne  jeremybentham  jennyodell  landscape  donnaharaway  technology  ingridburrington  nataliejeremijenko  trevorpaglen  jamesbridle 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Interdome - Race and Capital
"Separating economics from racism is something that I’ve been hearing lately. There are numerous good reasons for this. Economic oppression is not the same as racial oppression. The experience of suffering economic oppression is not the same as suffering racial oppression. Even if a component of racial oppression is suffering a disproportionate amount of economic oppression, the two are not equal and will never be. And while protests against economic oppression have followed a certain trajectory over the last few years, protests against racist oppression are following a different trajectory, bringing new protests and new leaders to the foreground, who have different experiences because of the context that is bringing them into the street.

However, let’s not forget that economic oppression is used as racial oppression, and is its lifeline. Nothing happens in this country without money spent to support it. The fight to raise the minimum wage, while benefiting all workers everywhere, will most initially support a class of workers who are disproportionately of color. Economics is indivisible from racism. This is the entire argument for monetary reparations.

People have been saying that #BlackLivesMatter isn’t about anti-capitalism—and this is correct, because anti-capitalism is not the reason these protests have started, and anti-capitalism is not the motivation, or the goal. But, the fight against racism in this country is about capitalism, because capitalism is the perpetuating force of the racism we are fighting.

The militarization of the police exists because of the military-industrial profiteers of the defense industry. They are the reason the weapons were made, and they are the reason the weapons will continue to come to police departments. Congress dropped its efforts to stop the flow of weapons. Think about who has money in the congressional races to stall that. It’s not the KKK.

The lack of oversight for police forces across the country stems from similar economics. The District Attorney who purposefully botched the grand jury in Ferguson has long ties to the police and to Democratic party politics in the area. There are rumors about even more troubling ties than that. But what is the machinery that keeps him in office? Local donors to the political machine, who want their police force and courts run the way this man is running them. Local businesses pay for the police. That they are local, does not make their money any less harmful. The same goes for any other city. Our government and police forces run on money, and the money tells them which way to turn their heads.

Nearly every stereotype about black people (and it holds true for other minorities as well) has an economic anchor. What is the bigoted view of black people in America? They are “thugs”, “lazy”, “angry”, “on drugs”, and “violent”. What are these demons, if not economic demons? They don’t work hard enough, they take your stuff, they are too emotional to be productive in the workplace, they waste their money, they can’t be counted on, which is the essence of a contract. Therefore, black people are hired less, paid less, fired more often. There is redlining, there is gentrification. There is abuse at the hands of a for-profit medical system. There is the prison system, a system filled with people of color because they don’t have the resources to fight back legally, because they can be sapped for what resources they do have and no one will stand up for them. These long-held, deep-seated bigotries that white people have against people of color cannot walk the face of the earth without kicking over the stacks of money that they generate, that props up these bigotries, that keeps people holding the worst of these bigotries in positions of power.

So yes: let us remember and repeat how this current movement is not about anti-capital. But let us also remember that the history of American racism is entirely inseparable from capital. If we are going to do something about the former, we will eventually have to tangle with the latter."
racism  capitalism  2014  ferguson  economics  blacklivesmatter  race  us  policy  militaryindustrialcomplex  oppression  schooltoprisonpipeline  protests  adamrothstein 
december 2014 by robertogreco
POSZU
"Some thoughts about Ello, the new social network of the moment.

Spoiler Alert: Ello will one day suck.

Take this as network pessimism if you want, or take it as a dare for Ello to last as long as it can. I was excited about Facebook once, and joined because I thought it might be everything that was good about the internet communities that I knew and loved. It wasn't. So I quit. There were blogs and I loved those, Twitter was amazing, but Google killed blogs along with RSS and now Twitter takes turns being tiresome and emotionally draining. I still have a blog, and I still use Twitter. But for how long?

Networks are important to us. My entire line of work stems from Twitter--it's how I get jobs. But I'm not going to either let it suck me under or go down with it furiously trying to bail. And I know many of you do important advocacy work to make sure that networks are egalitarian in their accessibility; i.e. as potentially fun for all as they are for some. But there are so many places that need defending.

My point is, for what little it might be worth: it doesn't seem that we are going to find the one resilient network that stands the test of time. We're never going to re-invent and preserve that one moment when everything seemed like it was going to be perfect for ever. At the risk of cascading waves of nostalgia for networked bliss that echo the non-existent generation of the golden age of newspapers, novels, radio, paintings, or whatever, we must reject this Christian utopianism. It is better, I think, to live out of our cars, so to speak, than try to set up roots on a terrain that is not solid, owned by others, and often times doesn't exist.

The best situations are those in which, when someone begins complaining, I can say, "great idea, how can I support you fixing that?" Instead of complaining about being hungry, you start chopping up vegetables. We commit to things, we ally ourselves with them, and invest in the project to give it some lasting life. But networks aren't like that. You can't really crowd-source building an interstate highway (or lack of one) without a state, as it turns out. A personal boycott isn't going to thwart Walmart. States and corporations are things that are bigger than us. They don't care what we think, and see no problem in running us over rather than slowing down. That doesn't mean they are permanent. It just means that history is going to be beset by disappointment and tragedies, because the people with the right ideas throwing themselves at the system just aren't big enough. Because of the frightening scale of our current networks, some of these tragedies are large enough to potentially kill us all. Far better than preparing to throw yourself underneath the wheels, is preparing to run.

Luckily, the fate of Ello isn't as cataclysmic as all this. But I am still fairly convinced that it will one day suck. Could be six months, three years, or ten years. I don't know when, and I don't know exactly why. But this particular network is being controlled by someone other than me, and I'm not going to barge into their offices and demand that they make changes that will satisfy my idea of what is not suck. Networks couldn't be more important, but to me, they couldn't be less worth it. Instead, I'll just leave when it is time to do so. I am fairly convinced that I will use a succession of social network like things for the rest of my life. Eventually, someone might really get it, and fix all the things, so that I feel good using a particular social network for more than six years of its evolution. But right now, that seems unlikely. (Just a single example: if a social network can't figure out that it will need a block button on its own, I don't have much hope for it's survival. There are tens of other examples.)

It's been said that the ability to not be connected is the greatest privilege of all. But as someone who regularly has his cell phone shut off because he can't pay to re-up his SIM, I know where all the open WiFi networks are in my immediate area. There's two ways of dealing with the raw deal at the bottom of the network customer food chain. You either give all your money to the ISP and spend all your time begging and pleading with them to not disconnect you. Or you get ready for when the internet is shut off, and you have a contingency plan.

See you all on IRC after the fire."
adamrothstein  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  networks  twitter  ello  cv  nomadism  digitalnomadism  resilience  onlycrash  nomads  neo-nomads  ephemeral  intentionalephemeral  migration  digitalmigration  2014  ephemerality 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Amazon.com: Drone (Object Lessons) (9781628926323): Adam Rothstein: Books
"Drones are in the newspaper, on the TV screen, and swarming through the networks. But what are drones? The word encompasses everything from toys to weapons. And yet, as broadly defined as they are, the word “drone” fills many of us with a sense of technological dread. This book will cut through the mystery, the unknown, and the political posturing, and talk about what drones really are: what technologies are out there, and what’s coming next; how drones are talked about, and how they are represented in popular culture. It turns out that drones are not as scary as they appear—but they are more complicated than you might expect. In drones, we find strange relationships that humans are forming with their new technologies."
books  drones  droneproject  2014  adamrothstein  toread 
july 2014 by robertogreco
coffee shop best practices for the transient info-worker | THE STATE
"While the coffee shop is generally an accepted place in which to set up one’s laptop and get to work, there is a bit of social obscurity to this exchange, and some aspects of the everyday capitalist potlatch through which one must navigate. Coffee shops are still interpreted by society at large as a place for buying and selling coffee, and to utilize one as a workspace requires some knowledge and skilled negotiation of certain grey market operations coursing just underneath the surface of the associated caffeination industries.

Due to bad negotiation of these market niceties on the part of info-workers attempting to use these facilities, some coffee shops have launched a backlash against their perception as a workspace. Particularly in places like the cutthroat capitalist region of San Francisco, coffee shops have disconnected their Wifi entirely, and in some places, done away with tables altogether in an effort to disband the info-working classes that have attached themselves to their services like a lamphrey to the belly of a whale—sucking up their data, energy, and seating space without contributing anything in return. They believe they can make more money without these parasites attached. Make no mistake, renting a table from a coffee shop is a market exchange in which a service is being exchanged for a price. But it is a market with an unspoken lack of definition. To attempt to abuse this lack of definition is to crush its weak structure, and make our presence pathological. Therefore, if computer users of the world wish this grey market to perpetuate, there are certain rules of its functioning by which we must abide.

General Principle: the transient workspace can only exist as long as the coffee shop continues to exist.



Rule One: pay for your time.



Rule Two: decide upon your rate.



Rule Three: consider your footprint.



Rule Four: consider your psychological impact.



"The difficulty with being a transient info-worker is that you cannot rely upon coffee shops in the way that one might rely on a rented office space or one’s home. This economy is by nature a precarious one. You are relying upon what is available unless you pay the premium to reserve a dedicated co-working space, which requires the sort of economic investment that many of us cannot make. This puts us in a delicate position. We do not owe anything to the coffee shops where we do our daily work, and yet, we are reliant upon their continued existence. We cannot afford the guaranteed service of a real customer, nor the part-ownership of a co-op member. Given our inability to play on the level of a dedicated, contractual customer, we must negotiate this grey market. These rules, therefore, do not take the form of ethical imperative, but instead, best practices and the optimist spirit of the opportunist, not the pessimistic spirit of the parasite. These rules are not fixed, but will no doubt shift as the markets we are forced to live within also shift, taking our daily existence with them."
coffeeshops  neo-nomads  infoworkers  coworking  etiquette  2014  adamrothstein  capitalism 
june 2014 by robertogreco
POSZU :: The Chastised Generation
"But Generation wasn't coddled as a child. Generation isn't weak and stupid. Generation doesn't exist.

There is no such thing as a generation, any more than there is such thing as a particular decade or a century. These are named spans of time, invented by language, named by society, and given laudable or ugly characteristics as any particular person sees fit. There is no Generation that is any particular way. There is only the Dads, and the Moms as well, who have birthed this epochal child for the sole purpose of beating it.

These self-appointed authorities and guardians of the social state are nothing more than the local cultural chamber of commerce. They have one goal—to produce statements of blanket condemnation against any social practice they deem anathema to their own existence. They are conservative by definition, because the systems they seek to maintain are always past-tense, defended against the present-tense. They sit on the throne of accomplishment and are willing to hand down advice, just so long as this advice could not in anyway compromise the legs of their own chair. They are a country club of Yes-Men surrounded by mirrors. And the youth are blocking their light.

Dad and Mom remind Generation of this in every one of their screaming fights. In their threats, whether spoken or implicit, about kicking Generation out of the house or taking it off the family health care plan. There is the constant reminder: you are not doing as well as we did, and so you have failed. This non-existent Generation hears this loud and clear, and solidifies a little more.

And so Generation starts going out at night, to get this existence out of the way, to avoid being in the way. Staying out of the house, hanging out in groups around the mall and the convenience store, Generation gets up to no good. Generation is chased by the cops down the street. Maybe Generation gets away, maybe it doesn't. Maybe Generation is part of a gang, or maybe it isn't."



"But parenting is the precisely the mistake, because there are no parents, and there are no children. Humans are born helpless, unable to move or feed. We require nurturing, or we would die. But the point at which humans can move and feed on their own comes quickly. Within a few years a human can care for its own body. And yet, we continue parenting for another ten, fifteen, twenty years, or longer.

Humans don't need parents. They don't need to be a Generation. They don't need the discipline of their so-called elders and betters, that is disguised as “care”. All of this “care” that we're given! It is unasked for, un-refuseable, unmistakable in its animosity.

Generation has been so coddled! It has had every advantage! So many times have the Dads and the Moms tried to drag up Generation into this more authentic state of humanity known as adulthood, with the reverse-mortgage known as “care”. They give it the best schools, the best food, the best medicine, and the most just punishment. What sort of brat would reject these privileges?

But what is the “care”? It is insult upon insult. It is punishment as a reversal of love. Generation is not so much the Coddled, as it is the Chastised Generation.

Look at what they say about Generation. From the time that it could read, the editorial pages are full of maligning text screaming Generation's name, telling it exactly what is wrong about it. This is a textbook of love, a required text that it must buy for hundreds of dollars each semester. And the teachers will make sure that Generation learns it by heart. Every child needs an education, and needs to know these canonical philosophies."



"Generation dozes off in class, exhausted after another night with no sleep. And what will it miss? Only more lessons about how real Generation is, and how real it's flaws are. A perspective on history that properly portrays the difference between adults and the youth, reinforces the rationale for care and this sort of education, and reminds Generation of what side it is on. As Generation grows up, it needs to be taught who the new Dads and Moms are, whether they are teachers, bosses, bureaucrats, or institutions.

But it doesn't need teachers, and it doesn't need authority. It doesn't need Dad and Mom for its emotional development. It don't need coddling, and it don't need care. What it actually need are allies. What it needs are equals. What it needs are friends. From its friends and equals, Generation can figure out how to be human, and how to collaboratively work with others. From its friends it can learn that it is not Generation at all—but merely billions of individuals. It can discover that all of these people don't owe anything to heritage, to progenitors, to the artificial categories that divide the Dads and Moms from the Generation. A friend is a human of the present-tense, a person of equals with no greater country club than every other human on the face of the earth. The real nurturing nature of this comradeship is what is beaten out of Generation with every fist, every class, every word, from the time it was taught to respond to its name.

We don't need to be a generation. We need to be allowed to become friends.

And this is what Generation realizes, out in the street one night, all night. And why is this night is different from all the other nights? Because on this night, the street is full of friends. And because there are so many friends, the streets are filling with police, the armed Dads and Moms of the State. They are here to dispense more care. There are too many friends here, too many equals, and so they must be made back into children and herded back to the classrooms and made to re-read the books. They beat and gas Generation with love, because Generation is acting out, and needs its punishment.

But suddenly, Generation can see this care for what it is. There is no Generation. There is only us."

[Also here: https://medium.com/p/385e3c13f2 ]
generations  youth  2013  canon  adamrothstein  policestate  patriarchy  cooperation  unschooling  deschooling  children  schooling  education  generationalwarfare  friendship  parenting  respect  generationy  millennials  history  tension  humans  human  conflict  conservatism 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Murmuration - Mission Parameters
"A drone is a literary character. It is an imagined future that we are in the process of making present. Our understanding of the drones flying over Pakistan are informed as much by the science fiction of the past as they are by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism.

Drones allow us re-image ourselves on both ends of the camera and on both ends of the geopolitical trigger. Art frees us to imagine the world through other people’s eyes. Art can enable us to confront the implications of people sitting in one continent with the power to stalk and kill people in another. The collaborative performance of art between the artist and the audience is a public space where, rather than in secret labs or bunkers, we should be investigating the capabilities of drones.

Drones prove that the future is imagined before it is invented.

We invite you to imagine with us: what is the past, present, and future of the drone?"

[Text from: http://murmurationfestival.tumblr.com/post/46792061701/mission-parameters ]
drones  2013  adamrothstein  via:timmaly  oliviarosane  droneproject  writing  scifi  sciencefiction  technology  geopolitics  art  future 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Radical Translation (with tweets) · ekstasis · Storify
"...In which I am Adam Rothstein's research assistant and we uncover (though do not entirely solve) a mystery of philosophy and publishing and translation and Black Panthers."
translation  publishing  philosophy  footnotes  mysteries  research  twitter  blackpanthers  georgejackson  2011  deleuze&guattari;  adamrothstein  williamball  blackpantherparty 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Rhizome | Drone Ethnography
"And then if you want a little bit a speculation about drones, you pick up the paranoid defense blogging of Danger Room  or the design-fiction of sousveillance and cyborg specialists like Tim Maly . And then you—

Okay. I thought it was clear, but if you want me to spell it out for you, I will. You are obsessed with drones. We all are. We live in a drone culture, just as we once lived in a car culture. The Northrop-Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk is your '55 Chevorlet. You just might not know it yet.

I have thirty-five browser tabs open, and each contains a fragment of the drone-mythos. Each is a glimpse at a situation, a bird’s eye view of the terrain. So many channels, showing me the same thing: near-infinite data collection. With the help of Google, I’m drone-spotting—I'm turning a new critical perspective that I'm calling Drone Ethnography, back on itself."
ethnography  military  technology  drones  diy  adamrothstein  2011  timmaly 
july 2011 by robertogreco

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