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robertogreco : adaptive   36

Sara Hendren Believes Disability Is a Cultural Construct
"Do we misunderstand technology that assists the disabled?

When we talk about design technology in the context of disability, we call it assistive technology. But all technology is assistive. Curb cuts were thought to be an extreme user case for wheelchairs. But it turns out that they also make passage through a city easy for a lot of people, like children who are learning to walk, and people who are pushing strollers. Look at the use of elevators. People who are with young children, people who are injured, people who are with older adults who have trouble walking all use them. The Oxo brand of kitchen tools was designed by a man whose wife had arthritis in her hands. He made a fortune by figuring out that a lot of people need some of the same tools that she did. Disabilities occupy the continuum of normal human variation, and technology can do something similar. It’s not that there is technology for normal people, and there is assistive technology for not-normal people.

How can the stigma surrounding technology for the disabled be addressed?

There is no stigma attached to your eyes having less than 20-20 vision. People who wear eyeglasses do not feel any shame in walking out of the door. But studies show there is plenty of stigma attached to hearing aids. I want people to see technologies doing lots of things for lots of people. There are plenty of design speculations, like a hearing aid could not only control the volume of what you are hearing but also how much you are hearing of one thing in particular. How much you are hearing what is in front of you, while tuning out the rest. That can be quite useful in a noisy restaurant. I think there are lots of other opportunities like this to de-stigmatize.

What do you make of the wide publicity given to high-end gear for disabled people, like exoskeletons?

I love these exoskeletons. I am astonished at them as a feat of engineering and think we should celebrate them and support them. I also think that they monopolize the headlines about disability, about prosthetics, and about the promise of technology. We have 100 other kinds of stories about the ways people are living their lives. Lives that are worth living with artifacts and gears but also with systems, jobs, and supports that comes from lots of places. Some of them are low-tech, some of them are systems-scale, and some of them are architectural. A lot of them are hidden from you. The director of the Adaptive Design Association in New York City just won a MacArthur “Genius” award. They have been building adaptive furniture out of triple-walled cardboard for pennies, for decades, and they do it for free. Jaipur Foot in India is producing recycled rubber limbs. There is daily living advice on websites targeted for people living with muscular dystrophy. Ways to button a shirt on your own, ways to hold a fork in a steady manner. There are white canes. White canes are a smart technology. They have resisted many new market entrants. People who are blind find them incredibly elegant and useful tools. But they do not make newsworthy headlines.

Is cheap, scalable technology a necessity?

History shows that the availability of technology doesn’t actually make a more equitable world. In this country, after 25 years of working for rights for people with disabilities, we are still seeing high unemployment rates for the disabled. Look at what happens even in the best inclusive schooling situations. Disabled students who age out of the public school system, their prospects just tank. And this is the richest country in the world, with all kinds of assistive and adaptive technology products available. So you will never convince me that just the sheer production of products that can be scaled cheaply is going to change the way people think about people who have disabilities. You need people to change their minds. So, I am an unabashed culture producer. I think, does democracy come when the next five great products come to the market? History shows that is not the case. History shows that people change their minds based on a lot of things. Look at the way gay rights have been transformed in this country. Sitcoms starting in the ’90s had openly gay characters that went out on national networks, like Ellen. It would have been unheard of more than 25 years ago. So, I think there is a lot of tech-saviorism in the world around disability. People act like engineering is going to rescue these bodies. Then what? Are they going to get better jobs, or suddenly get the respect or the dignity that they are asking for? I strongly feel that engineering does some good things—and cultural forms and stories, objects and artifacts, symbols and metaphors also do things to change the world."
2016  interviews  sarahendren  disability  technology  assistivetechnology  stigma  bias  technosolutionsism  normal  adaptive  adaptivetechnology  disabilities 
march 2016 by robertogreco
investigating normal. | Abler.
"SYLLABUS

ENGR 3299 Investigating Normal: Adaptive and Assistive Technologies

Assistive technologies usually refer to prosthetics and medical aids: tools, devices, and other gear that either restore or augment the functioning of body parts. Historically, these have been designed for people with diagnosable disabilities. In this course, we look at medical as well as cultural tools that investigate the “normal” body and mind, and we design our own devices—high-tech, low-tech, digital or analog—with these ideas in mind. Through readings, site visits, guest speakers, and projects, we investigate both traditional and unusual prosthetics and assistive technologies, broadly defined. We talk to end-users, to engineers and industrial designers, to artists, and to others whose technologies assist with visible and invisible needs, externalize hidden dynamics, and create capacities far beyond or outside ordinary functionality.

Key to our discussions will be the implicit and explicit narratives that get created by and with prosthetic technologies. We’ll look at popular prosthetic tools and examine how their users “perform” them, keeping economic and socio-political factors in mind. We’ll also investigate the ways these narratives get lumped together or distinguished from the available and popular cultural narratives about the cyborg self, about human-machine interfaces in general. With this analysis in mind, I’ll ask you to consider new possibilities for manufacturable prosthetic and medical technologies in the interest of better treatment, especially if that’s where your personal interest lies. But I’ll also ask you to engage in what’s been called interrogative design, or critical design, or resonant design: that is, problem finding as well as problem solving; suspending questions by pressing together, in one artifact or set of artifacts, seemingly disparate or opposing ideas; thinking about what Anthony Dunne calls “para-functionality”: design that lives among recognizable realms of utility, but expands, as he says, beyond conventional definitions of functionalism to include the poetic, or activist, or socio-political.

The class themes are heterogeneous in the first half of the course—on purpose. With visitors and projects and readings, we’ll jump quickly between and among high-tech, low-tech, practical and impractical tools and wearables. The idea is to have you exposed to as many dispositions for making your projects as possible. This “field” is very wide indeed, and its generativity is still under-recognized. Be ready for some zigs and zags along the way, but the goal is to help you elicit your own questions as potential engineers in this broad research space.

It’s worth mentioning right up front that you should divest yourself of the common and well-intended—but utterly misguided—earnestness that drives many designers’ assumptions about “assistive technology.” It may be tempting to find some technical novelty or functional gadget and then, only afterward, look for an application “for the disabled.” I’ve seen too many projects in this vein lately.

Be aware, first, that a central tenet of this class is that all technology is assistive technology: No matter what kind of body you inhabit, you are getting assistance from your devices and extensions and proxies every single day. And second, gird yourself with a proper humility: Ask lots of questions, do the research on precedent tools, and respect the stunning sensory organism that is the living, breathing, adaptive human body. White canes, ankle braces, and assistance animals, after all, are extraordinarily sophisticated prostheses. Digital tools offer unique capabilities, yes—but they’re not inherently “smart” because of their digital nature. The point here is to see ability and disability as an exciting, expansive lens with which to think about many bodies and many kinds of needs.

Finally: This video with Judith Butler and Sunaura Taylor is a kind of manifesto, a solid frame from which the ethos of the course proceeds. Please watch early and often:"
sarahendren  syllabus  2015  normal  adaptive  technology  assistivetechnology  adaptivetechnology  anthonydunne  judithbutler  sunauratayor  earnestness  disability  difference  bodies  human  prosthetics  para-functionality  design  disabilities  body  syllabi 
april 2015 by robertogreco
people's architecture office develops modular tangram canopy
"the beijing-based people’s architecture office has developed a modular roof structure that references the tangram, a chinese game that features individual triangular pieces which can be rearranged into various forms. the canopy’s flat roof ensures that the single modules are not dependent on orientation, meaning that the resultant spaces are infinitely expandable in all directions.

the design consists of truss-like L-shaped units made from 10mm thick steel rods. the lightness of the structure allows it to blend into the background, while the canopy appears to float above. additionally, the long spans provide flexible open spaces with minimal obstructions, ideal for a variety of events. the tangram canopy debuted as a covered market for the 2014 coart festival in the chinese town of lijiang, yunnan."
tangrams  architecture  design  adaptability  adaptive  reconfiguration  2015 
january 2015 by robertogreco
guiding principles for an adaptive technology working group | Abler.
"I’ve been thinking about the studio/lab/workshop environment I want to foster at Olin. So herewith a manifesto, or a set of guiding principles, for young engineers and designers working critically, reflexively, in technology design and disability.

1. We use the terms “adaptive” and “assistive” technologies interchangeably when speaking casually or with newcomers to this field, but we use the terms of adaptation as often as possible. Why? Assistance usually implies linearity. A problem needs fixing, seeks a solution. But adaptation is flexible, rhizomatic, multi-directional. It implies a technological design that works in tandem, reciprocally, with the magnificence that is the human body in all its forms. Adaptation implies change over time. Adaptive systems might require the environment to shift, rather than the body. In short, we believe that all technology is assistive technology—and so we speak in terms of adaptation.

2. We presume competence. This exhortation is a central one in disability rights circles, and we proceed with it in mind as we work with our design partners. We don’t claim our end-users are “suffering from” their conditions—unless they tell us they are. We speak directly to users themselves, not to caregivers or companions—unless we’re directed to do so. We speak the way we’d speak to anyone, even if our partners don’t use verbal language in return—until they request we do otherwise. We take a capabilities approach.

3. We are significantly public-facing in our disposition. Doing open and public research—including in the early stages—is central to our conviction that design for disability carries with it enormous political and cultural stakes. We research transparently, and we cultivate multiple and unusual publics for the work.

4. We spend some of our time making things, and some of our time making things happen.¹ A lot of our effort is embodied in the design and prototyping process. But another significant portion of that effort is directed toward good narrative writing, documentation, event-wrangling, and networked practices. Design can be about a better mousetrap; it can also be—and indeed more often should be—a social practice.

5. We actively seek a condition of orchestrated adjacencies: in topics, scales, and methods. Some of our projects attempt to influence industry: better designs, full stop. And some of our projects address issues of culture: symbolic, expressive, and playful work that investigates normalcy and functionality. We want high-tech work right up alongside low-tech work. Cardboard at one end, and circuits and Arduino at the other. Materially and symbolically, adjacencies in real time create unusual resonances between and among projects. They expand the acceptable questions and categories of what counts as research. They force big-picture ideas to cohere with granular problem-solving.

6. We presume, always, that technology is never neutral. And accordingly, we seek to create tools for conviviality, in the sense that Ivan Illich laid out in his book of the same name. Tools that are “accessible, flexible, noncoercive.” We won’t be perfect at it, but we won’t shy away from hard questions: What will it cost? What might be unintended consequences? What have we overlooked?

Like life, this version is subject to change. More on the studio/lab/workshop in this earlier post.

1. “I went from making things, to making things happen.” That’s artist Jeremy Deller on how his art practice went from objects to conditions and situations."
art  design  making  sarahendren  2014  assistivetechnology  adaptivetechnology  olincollege  manifestos  rhizomes  adaptation  human  humans  bodies  criticaldesign  conviviality  ivanilllich  normalcy  functionality  orchestratedadjacencies  hitech  lowtech  agency  makers  socialpractice  transparency  questionasking  askingquestions  jeremydeller  studios  lcproject  openstudioproject  howwework  ethics  ideals  disability  disabilities  differences  time  change  conversation  principles  adaptive  body  low-tech 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Squishy Not Slick - Squishy Not Slick
"Squishy Teaching =

Spontaneous - Unique - Particular - Tailored - Entangled - Mixed together - Woven - Patched - Organic - Rebel Forces - Poetic - Ambiguous - Emotional - Non-linear - Non-sequenced - Inquisitive - Inextricably-linked - Constructivist - Experiential - Holistic - Democratizing - Authentic - Collaborative - Adaptive - Complicated - Contextual - Relational

Slick Teaching =

Mass produced - Psychologically manipulative - Planned years in advance - Manufactured - Imperial - Hegemonic - Afraid - Spreadsheeted - Shallow - Narcotizing - Cauterizing - Anti-intellectual - Uncritical - Uncreative - Emotionless - Scripted - Juking the stats - Dropout factories - Assembly-lined"
lukeneff  teaching  education  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  mentoring  squishy  slick  frankchimero  pedagogy  holisticapproach  holistic  constructivism  democratic  ambiguity  audiencesofone  individualization  emotions  empathy  authenticity  spontaneity  collaboration  collaborative  adaptability  adaptive  context  contextual  relationships  meaning  sensemaking  meaningmaking  meaningfulness  dialogue  discussion  dialog 
may 2011 by robertogreco
what’s wrong with “prosthetics porn”? (part II) | Abler.
"How can technologies demonstrate an outward posture? I mean, how might they extend their forms and also their functions, beyond a single user? Couldn’t they both resolve & reveal, pose more questions than answers?…"

"A built environment, a city that accommodates—& indeed demonstrates—physical or cognitive interdependence doesn’t only call for limbs & ramps. We need wholly-spectacular impracticalities, & artistic research & collaboration, & public interactive art, & we need the most durable accessibility equipment we can design."

"Moreover, we might take the long view in order to get the short view more clearly in focus. This has long been said of science fiction in literature—that our ideas about the future are really an index of our attitudes in the present. I’m interested in futurism in prosthetics as an inquiry & spectacle, & I also want to make projects that help us harness our technologies for a more inclusive world."
abler  sarahendren  prosthetics  bikes  bikesharing  interdependence  cities  architecture  technology  assistivetechnology  art  publicart  accessibility  design  present  future  inclusiveness  inclusion  futurism  objects  objectfixations  prostheticsporn  modernism  utopia  structures  spatialagency  brunolatour  parasite  michaelrakowitz  rebar  adaptivetechnology  adaptive  eyeborg  eyewear  tandems  tandembicycles  biking  spoke-o-dometer  inclusivity  inlcusivity 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Yiibu - About this site...
"The site is designed using the ‘mobile first’ principle. Also incorporated are elements of responsive design.

The base content and default presentation are mobile, and optimized for the very simplest devices first. We've defined this as 'basic' support.

Devices with small screens and media query support are served an enhanced layout—and occasionally—more complex content. We've called this 'mobile'.

Finally, the layout and content are enhanced to reflect the 'desktop' context.

On the first visit, the server checks for a 'properties' cookie containing specific browser 'feature support' results (obtained from tests carried out by a little bit of JavaScript). Devices that don't supply a 'properties' cookie, or have JavaScript disabled are always served the basic version of the site."

[See also http://www.slideshare.net/bryanrieger/rethinking-the-mobile-web-by-yiibu AND http://www.metaltoad.com/blog/stop-you-are-doing-mobile-wrong AND http://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?933 ]
mediaqueries  mobilefirst  responsive  webdesign  web  mobile  html5  standards  browsers  adaptive  yiibu  mobileweb  webdev  via:preoccupations  development  design  usability  ux  progressiveenhancement  browser 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Pruned: Flutter Field
"WeatherField is a shape-shifting energy generation park in Abu Dhabi. The park is organized and designed to respond efficiently and creatively to climate. Energy generation becomes a public performance, dynamic, reactive, and interactive. The park is active when weather events are active, and calm when weather is calm, in each instance offering the public a compatible experiences."

[Quote from: http://spime.org/post/1017546133/weatherfield-is-a-shape-shifting-energy-generation]
weather  energy  abudhabi  weatherfield  responsive  adaptive  reactive  interactive  art  sculpture 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Every user a developer, part II, or: Momcomp « Adam Greenfield's Speedbird
"The things which I’ve painted as trivial here are admittedly anything but. But they are, I sincerely believe, how we’re going to handle — have to handle — the human interface to this so-called Internet of Things we keep talking about. Each of the networked resources in the world, whether location or service or object or human being, is going to have to be characterized in a consistent, natural, interoperable way, and we’re going to have to offer folks equally high-level environments for process composition using these resources. We’re going to have to devise architectures and frameworks that let ordinary people everywhere interact with all the networked power that is everywhere around them, and do so in a way that doesn’t add to their existing burden of hassle and care.

Momcomp, in other words. It’s an idea whose time I believe has come."
programming  future  internetofthings  development  design  adaptive  ux  ui  tools  momcomp  usability  android  everyware  adamgreenfield  participation  google  appinventor  interaction  invention  literacy  computing  content  mobile  making  technology  alankay  hypercard  jefraskin  bencerveny  junrekimoto  tednelson  dougengelbart  spimes  iot 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Brains Of Deaf People Rewire To "Hear" Music
"Deaf people sense vibration in the part of the brain that other people use for hearing – which helps explain how deaf musicians can sense music, and how deaf people can enjoy concerts and other musical events. "These findings suggest that the experience deaf people have when ‘feeling’ music is similar to the experience other people have when hearing music. The perception of the musical vibrations by the deaf is likely every bit as real as the equivalent sounds, since they are ultimately processed in the same part of the brain," says Dr. Dean Shibata, assistant professor of radiology at the University of Washington."
brain  deaf  hearing  neurology  neuroscience  technology  research  adaptive  composition  via:hrheingold 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Greater Good Magazine | The Compassionate Instinct
"Parents who rely on induction engage their children in reasoning when they have done harm, prompting their child to think about the consequences of their actions and how these actions have harmed others. Parents who rely on power assertion simply declare what is right and wrong, and resort more often to physical punishment or strong emotional responses of anger. Nancy Eisengerg, Richard Fabes, and Martin Hoffman have found that parents who use induction and reasoning raise children who are better adjusted and more likely to help their peers. ... Parents can also teach compassion by example. A landmark study of altruism by Pearl and Samuel Oliner found that children who have compassionate parents tend to be more altruistic. In the Oliners' study of Germans who helped rescue Jews during the Nazi Holocaust, one of the strongest predictors of this inspiring behavior was the individual's memory of growing up in a family that prioritized compassion and altruism."
science  collaboration  psychology  humanity  adaptive  morality  empathy  compassion  rationality  ethics  self-interest  religion  evolution  parenting 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Snarkmarket: I Got My BA In IS From the CC
"Community colleges have long been where the bodies are in higher education, but now it’s ridiculous. The economy’s collapse has sent college students’ enrollments rolling downhill - kids who would have gone to expensive private schools are enrolling in moderately priced public universities, the university kids are going to regional colleges, and the regional students to community colleges. If you want to get more students with college degrees, community colleges are a natural place to start...Think about it. Community college students (and teachers and IT departments) today often aren’t as tech-saavy as their university counterparts, but they can innovate in the use of digital technology. In fact, they have to. They don’t have the same physical plant and infrastructure as larger, more expensive schools. They’re unlikely to have folks on campus doing original research. They’re not mainframes. They’re terminals. But there’s a difference between smart and dumb terminals."
communitycolleges  colleges  universities  education  future  flexibility  lcproject  technology  change  reform  adaptive  adaptability  money  recession  learning  snarkmarket  economics  ccs 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Neo-nomad.net » transvaal: sleeping in residue
"Hotel Transvaal uses the surplus of empty spaces in the neighborhood. In houses soon to be demolished, not yet sold newly built on derelict land and in unused spaces that have been refurnished by merchants from the neighborhood and artists into 1 to 5 star hotel rooms. The supply of rooms is very diverse in terms of furniture, luxury and price, so that anyyone, businessmen, students, tourists, residents and other guests can rent a place. When homes are sold or the torn down the hotel rooms move on."
design  surplus  reuse  hotels  housing  homes  recycling  temporary  adaptivereuse  adaptive 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Consumed - Repurpose-Driven Life - NYTimes.com
"A recent book, “Retrofitting Suburbia,” by Ellen Dunham-Jones and June Williamson, notes that in 1986, the United States had about 15 square feet of retail space per person in shopping centers. That was already a world-leading figure, but by 2003 it had increased by a third, to 20 square feet. The next countries on the list are Canada (13 square feet per person) and Australia (6.5 square feet); the highest figure in Europe is in Sweden, with 3 square feet per person. “Retrofitting Suburbia,” as its title suggests, is concerned with projects that address problems stemming from “leapfrog”-style development — the constant expansion of new housing, and new stores, farther away from city centers. As Dunham-Jones, an associate professor of architecture at Georgia Tech, told me when we spoke recently, one of those problems is that we’ve gotten “overretailed.”"
adaptivereuse  reuse  architecture  retail  space  change  crisis  adaptive  suburbia  malls  us  suburbs  books  via:adamgreenfield 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Ramshackle Architecture Futures: Danube Waterways | > jim rossignol
"Assuming the world does end up flooding, thanks to defrosted polar regions, then we’re unlikely to be taking to the seas. We’re more likely to just cluster along the new coastlines, dealing with the flooding and building our new homes around it. Bruce Sterling looks at such things happening right now in this Serbian documentary, where people living on uninsurable land, or regularly flooded sections of the Danube. They are building piecemeal dwellings that either float, or are on stilts, and repurpose and reuse materials from other dwellings."
homes  housing  climatechange  europe  jimrossignol  brucesterling  video  serbia  floating  reuse  danube  rivers  architecture  design  adaptation  adaptive  adaptability 
june 2009 by robertogreco
GM Car Dealerships Closing - 4 Ways to Use Old Car Dealerships - thedailygreen.com
"From new town centers to public art projects -- there is potential in the demise of 1,100 GM dealerships and nearly 800 Chrysler dealerships."
urban  reuse  future  urbanism  industry  green  food  autoindustry  dealerships  adaptive 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Stephen Bayley on design innovations with flexible shapes | Art and design | The Observer
"Of course, "dynamic architecture" may also be a larger metaphor for the economic, moral and political uncertainties of our era. Poetic, really, to think that every wall may become a door. And it may be happening in design too. Late last year, BMW revealed Gina (a slightly forced acronym of Geometry, Infinity and Adaptation). This is a car whose shape can change. As soon as designer Chris Bangle realised that structural and safety priorities did not depend on external metalwork, he asked himself: "What do we need the skin of a car for?" So Gina's membrane covering can morph and adapt for different weathers and different aesthetics.
architecture  homes  housing  dynamic  slidinghouse  shapechanging  adaptive 
february 2009 by robertogreco
cityofsound: The Adaptive City
"Sadly, the history of technology and the city is not actually one of smooth implementation, shared standards, and open access. It progresses awkwardly, in fits and starts, rather than smoothly and equitably. Yet the history of urban development itself is also awkward. Nonetheless, here is the hint of a promise that a city could heal itself, as if the adaptive membrane of earlier cities is present at the scale of later cities.
urban  adaptive  urbancomputing  danhill  cityofsound  cities  urbanism  informatics  urbanplanning  history  everyware  ubicomp 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Annals of Innovation: In the Air: Who says big ideas are rare? - The New Yorker
"Merton’s observation about scientific geniuses is clearly not true of artistic geniuses, however. You can’t pool the talents of a dozen Salieris and get Mozart’s Requiem. You can’t put together a committee of really talented art students and get
malcolmgladwell  ideas  innovation  creativity  technology  entrepreneurship  economics  discovery  culture  intelligence  genius  adaptive  thinking  science  invention  mind  brainstorming  history  art  patents  ip  paleontology  dinosaurs  design  process 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Abitacolo: Bruno Munari's Kid Space Machine -- Daddy Types
"modular fixture for a kid's room that combined storage, play, writing, and sleeping in one reconfigurable wire-frame package. Despite the presence of a near-identical idea for multipurpose living structures, Munari wasn't mentioned in either of Hennessey
brunomunari  design  furniture  homes  children  adaptive  glvo 
april 2008 by robertogreco
CoolTown Studios: Schools as community centers
"I blogged about this almost two years ago in Schools as Third Places, and the schools as community centers idea is becoming increasingly popular. In fact, there is such an organization by the same name that focuses on this very trend."
lcproject  schools  community  education  learning  cities  reuse  adaptive  planning  urban 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Modu: Modu Cellphone Changes Function with Jackets
"Modu phone carries your data, giving your personality to whatever gadget you insert it into, GameBoy cartridge style. After seeing all the pictures of the different jackets and the announced prices, the video and the idea makes a lot more sense now."
mobile  phones  data  adaptive  multifunction  modu 
february 2008 by robertogreco
exaptation: Definition and Much More from Answers.com
"The utilization of a structure or feature for a function other than that for which it was developed through natural selection."
biology  adaptive  adaptation  animals  human  technology  words  evolution  glvo  science 
august 2007 by robertogreco
Products Are People Too (Schulze & Webb)
"Design can be easier when we acknowledge that products share our homes and malls, and have wants and lives of their own. In short: Products are people too. Matt traces a path through social software, adaptive design and engaging technology, and puts forw
design  product  mattwebb  ux  products  presentations  reboot9  adaptive 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Tinselman: Living Blimps
"Can blimps learn, adapt and evolve? Yes... when they've been designed by Qarl. After senseless pillaging by certain vicious Second Life land owners, Qarl had finally had it up to here! His solution: artificial life. Now his blimps lead much happier lives
sl  virtual  blimps  transportation  ai  adaptive  evolution  comments  airships  dirigibles 
november 2006 by robertogreco
Wired News: Smart Buildings Make Smooth Moves
"What if buildings could function like living systems, altering their shapes in response to changing weather conditions or the way people use them?"
architecture  design  adaptive  engineering  future 
september 2006 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Architecture and interaction design, via adaptation and hackability
"Can products be made hackable, or are all products hackable? What types of things can be designed into products to make them more hackable? What are the qualities of adaptive designs? What can interaction designers learn about adaptability from architect
adaptive  architecture  design  hacks  innovation  psychology  usability  interaction 
may 2006 by robertogreco
TheStar.com - Campuses ringed by barriers
"Her professors kept saying her generation had to be mobile, flexible and ready to compete in the global economy. But everyone she knew who had tried to switch universities had run into rigid barriers. How can students be adaptable, she wondered, when it
education  colleges  universities  flatworld  mobility  adaptive  alternative  international  world  society  altgdp  lcproject  future  homeschool  institutions 
may 2006 by robertogreco
mafox courses in Interactive Architecture (Sci-Arc)
"The iZoo is an interactive architectural space that will captivate all who enter it. It is a space that fosters human connections, that floods the senses, that is educational and manipulative. It is a space that provides us with an architectural awarenes
design  architecture  interactive  robots  adaptive  losangeles  schools 
november 2005 by robertogreco

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